Washington Post: In two states, a vast testing gap shows what it means to have no national strategy

Washington Post: In two states, a vast testing gap shows what it means to have no national strategy. “When it comes to battling the spread of the novel coronavirus, Kentucky and Rhode Island might look similar on paper. They’ve done comparable numbers of diagnostic tests and lost similar numbers of residents to the disease. But there’s one key difference. Kentucky has more than four times Rhode Island’s population, meaning it has tested 0.7 percent of its residents, compared with Rhode Island’s 3.7 percent, the highest per capita testing level in the United States. The difference suggests Rhode Island probably has a better sense of the virus’s spread throughout the state, making it better prepared to curb it.”

H-Kentucky: Laura Clay Papers now digitized and online at ExploreUK

H-Kentucky: Laura Clay Papers now digitized and online at ExploreUK. “The Laura Clay papers (dated 1819-1959, bulk 1906-1920; 13.63 cubic feet; 34 boxes, 2 folders, 3 items) consists of correspondence, pamphlets, periodicals, organizational records, petitions, scrapbooks, broadsides, programs, legal documents, and suffrage pins and ribbons, which document the career of Kentucky suffragist Laura Clay.”

EurekAlert: Researchers seek new drugs to fight coronavirus using computers in schools across Kentucky

EurekAlert: Researchers seek new drugs to fight coronavirus using computers in schools across Kentucky. “The novel coronavirus may have K-12 students in Kentucky’s school districts learning at home, but researchers at the University of Louisville are using the computing power of thousands of computers in classrooms across the state to identify drugs to treat COVID-19. The desktop computers are part of the DataseamGrid, a network of computers housed in classrooms of 48 Kentucky school districts as part of a partnership designed to support research, education and workforce development.”

CNN: A coronavirus patient refused to quarantine, so deputies are surrounding his house to force him to

CNN: A coronavirus patient refused to quarantine, so deputies are surrounding his house to force him to. “A Kentucky novel coronavirus patient checked himself out of the hospital against medical advice. So to prevent him from spreading the virus, officials are surrounding his house to keep him there. The 53-year-old man in Nelson County refused to quarantine himself after testing positive for Covid-19, Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said.”

WOWK: Non-profit organization connects shoppers with local artisans across the tri-state

WOWK: Non-profit organization connects shoppers with local artisans across the tri-state. “The ‘Foothills Exploration of Appalachian Tourism’ (FEAT) group has been assisting local artisans in Northeast Kentucky for several years. Now, the group is expanding into other areas in the tri-state. Ohio and West Virginia artisans and small businesses can now join the group through their new website.”

Courier Journal: A new website allows 152,000 Kentucky felons to see if their voting rights were restored

Courier Journal: A new website allows 152,000 Kentucky felons to see if their voting rights were restored. “Nearly three months after restoring voting rights to many Kentuckians convicted of felonies who had completed sentences, Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday said the numbers of those restored totaled 152,000. On Wednesday, Beshear said the state has a new website with a searchable database for people to find out if their voting rights were restored.”

ProPublica: Kentucky’s $1.5 Billion Information Highway to Nowhere

ProPublica: Kentucky’s $1.5 Billion Information Highway to Nowhere. “The internet arrived in some parts of eastern Kentucky’s Jackson and Owsley counties on the back of a mule named Old Bub. Nine years ago, Old Bub trudged between the rugged counties’ most remote utility poles, hauling the high-capacity fiber-optic cable intended to help bring Appalachian residents into the information age. Today, Old Bub symbolizes something else — a poor state plodding along the information highway.”

Route Fifty: They Were Promised Broadband and High-Tech Jobs. They’re Still Waiting.

Route Fifty: They Were Promised Broadband and High-Tech Jobs. They’re Still Waiting.. “Kentucky’s plan to bring broadband to remote parts of the state has sputtered and its future looks increasingly bleak. State leaders told rural residents it would create better business opportunities. But instead, they keep getting left behind.”

WPSD: McCracken County Public Library publishes WPSD digital archive dating back to 1957

WPSD: McCracken County Public Library publishes WPSD digital archive dating back to 1957. “A lot’s changed at WPSD over the years. Some of you may remember when we had a bowling alley in the building. We taped and aired ‘Romper Room,’ hosted ‘Dance Party,’ and held a Saturday night wrestling match. Of course, people remember legends like Tom Butler. Now, you can relive our history, thanks to the McCracken County Public Library.”

Courier Journal: Who did Matt Bevin pardon and why? Look up his Kentucky pardons on our exclusive database

Courier Journal: Who did Matt Bevin pardon and why? Look up his Kentucky pardons on our exclusive database. “Gov. Matt Bevin issued 254 pardons between his loss to Andy Beshear on Election Day and the end of his term…. Those 254 pardons are among the more than 670 pardons and commutations Bevin issued during his final two months in office. The Courier Journal is working to provide details from each pardon order filed with the Secretary of State’s office.”

University of Kentucky: UK Libraries Makes 13,000+ Lexington Herald-Leader Images Available Online

University of Kentucky: UK Libraries Makes 13,000+ Lexington Herald-Leader Images Available Online. “This fall, the University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center launched a custom digital library for the John C. Wyatt Lexington Herald-Leader (LHL) photographs collection. The site provides access to more than 13,000 digitized images with advanced search features, location mapping, an integrated collection guide viewer and more.”

Ars Technica: Algorithms should have made courts more fair. What went wrong?

Ars Technica: Algorithms should have made courts more fair. What went wrong?. “Kentucky lawmakers thought requiring that judges consult an algorithm when deciding whether to hold a defendant in jail before trial would make the state’s justice system cheaper and fairer by setting more people free. That’s not how it turned out.”

Louisville Courier Journal: Zillow says Kentucky is overcharging for public real estate records. So it’s suing

Louisville Courier-Journal: Zillow says Kentucky is overcharging for public real estate records. So it’s suing. “In the lawsuit, Zillow is challenging the constitutionality of a Kentucky law that allows government agencies to charge ‘commercial’ parties such as Zillow much more for access to public records than other ‘noncommercial’ companies. “