Mashujaa: Celebrate the communities of Kenya with Google Arts & Culture (Google Blog)

Google Blog: Mashujaa: Celebrate the communities of Kenya with Google Arts & Culture. “Originally launched in 2019, Utamaduni Wetu: Meet the People of Kenya is Google’s most ambitious digitization project to date in Africa, and one of the first digital content features on the subject of Kenyan communities. Everyone can now explore over 10,600 high-resolution photographs, 170 expert-curated exhibits, 80 Street Views of 16 sites and learn more about the intangible heritage and stories of the country’s 44 communities officially registered by the government.”

Reuters: Kenyan museum, Mau Mau fighter shed light on British colonial abuses

Reuters: Kenyan museum, Mau Mau fighter shed light on British colonial abuses. “The camps, where tens of thousands are thought to have died, are a traumatic but largely forgotten part of Kenya’s past. They were set up to jail activists and sympathisers during the Mau Mau uprising of 1952-1960, in which [Gitu Wa] Kahengeri, born in the 1920s and a Secretary General of the independence movement’s Veterans Association, participated. Using eye-witness accounts, documents and field visits, Kenyan and British historians from the Museum of British Colonialism are now building an online archive of the period, complete with 3D recreations of some of the camps.”

Erasing 76 Crimes: Online archive focuses on LGBT Kenyans from 1800s on

Erasing 76 Crimes: Online archive focuses on LGBT Kenyans from 1800s on. “Activist and author Denis Nzioka has launched KumbuKumbu, a new free resource that collects and preserves records documenting Kenya’s sexual and gender diverse cultures from the 1800s to today. Still in its early stages, the growing collection includes newspaper articles, book and film reviews, and research to showcase stories with ‘historical depth and understanding’.”

Google Blog: Preserving stories of Black History in the UK and beyond

Google Blog: Preserving stories of Black History in the UK and beyond. “The theme of the motherland can also be found in another new exhibition on Google Arts & Culture. Everyone in the world can trace their origins back to East Africa, which is sometimes called the cradle of mankind. We’ve collaborated with the National Museums of Kenya in a new online collection that celebrates the heritage and stories of Kenya’s many communities.” I had mentioned this before in RB but only as something that was going to happen, and I didn’t realize it was so close to competition.

Our Grandmother’s Miniskirt: A People’s History Through Photographs and Stories (The Elephant)

The Elephant: Our Grandmother’s Miniskirt: A People’s History Through Photographs and Stories. “Over the past few weeks, I’ve been inviting people to share photos of their mothers, grandmothers and aunties looking stylish in the fashion of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. The idea, which we are calling ‘Our Grandmother’s Miniskirt’, is simple enough, crowdsource photographs from Kenyan homes of women dressed in the style of that era; the photographs will be accompanied by reflections, essays, short stories or poems. The aim is to capture a history of ordinary people and to share this history through physical exhibitions, an online archived exhibition, and a coffee table book.”