The Canberra Times: When a search engine’s the easy way out

The Canberra Times: When a search engine’s the easy way out. “Information has become so easily accessible, so addictive, it’s now the conversational equivalent of junk food, undigested chymus cycling through a common digestive tract encircling the entire planet. We gorge and we defecate. A little bit of knowledge is, of course, a dangerous thing but what’s the result when we begin to hold knowledge in such contempt it loses its primacy? How dangerous is that?”

Vice: Inside an Early 1900s Attempt to Catalogue all of the Information on Earth

Vice: Inside an Early 1900s Attempt to Catalogue all of the Information on Earth. “A short train ride from Brussels, in the sleepy university town of Mons, Belgium, is an inconspicuous white building that houses a relatively obscure testament to humanity’s thirst for knowledge. Called the Mundaneum, the building houses an early-1900s attempt at collecting and cataloging the entirety of the world’s information, nearly a century before sites like Google and Wikipedia made access to such repositories easily accessible from anywhere with a Wi-Fi signal.”

The Atlantic: All of Human Knowledge Buried in a Salt Mine

The Atlantic: All of Human Knowledge Buried in a Salt Mine. “Martin Kunze wants to gather a snapshot of all of human knowledge onto plates and bury it away in the world’s oldest salt mine. In Hallstatt, Austria, a picturesque village nestled into a lake-peppered region called Salzkammergut, Kunze has spent the past four years engraving images and text onto hand-sized clay squares. A ceramicist by trade, he believes the durability of the materials he plies gives them an as-yet unmatched ability to store information. Ceramic is impervious to water, chemicals, and radiation; it’s emboldened by fire. Tablets of Sumerian cuneiform are still around today that date from earlier than 3000 B.C.E.”