WUSA: Did your landlord receive a mortgage deferral? This new online tool holds DC landlords accountable

WUSA: Did your landlord receive a mortgage deferral? This new online tool holds DC landlords accountable. “Back in April, DC Council passed emergency COVID-19 legislation that required mortgage lenders to offer deferrals to property owners. The legislation also called for those property owners to pass that same relief on to their renters. DISB, the District’s Department of Insurance, Securities, and Banking created a tool that allows renters to hold their landlords accountable. It’s called the mortgage deferment locator tool.”

The Guardian: Sick, elderly, pregnant: the California renters being evicted even during the pandemic

The Guardian: Sick, elderly, pregnant: the California renters being evicted even during the pandemic. “When Covid-19 halted California’s economy, state officials promised to prevent evictions and defend tenants’ rights. But a dozen renters and their attorneys told the Guardian that some landlords are proceeding to expel them from their homes despite the new regulations, indicating there are significant gaps in the protections.”

New York Times: This Brooklyn Landlord Just Canceled Rent for Hundreds of Tenants

New York Times: This Brooklyn Landlord Just Canceled Rent for Hundreds of Tenants. “A few days after losing his job in March, Paul Gentile was throwing away trash outside his Brooklyn apartment building when he noticed a new sign hanging near the front door. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, which has brought life to a near standstill in New York City and caused an untold number of people to lose their jobs, tenants in the building did not need to pay April rent, it read.”

Curbed NY: Interactive eviction map shows where landlords are booting tenants

Curbed NY: Interactive eviction map shows where landlords are booting tenants. “A new interactive map tracking eviction rates across the five boroughs paints a stark portrait of the city’s housing crisis. The data visualizations, created by Acting Public Advocate and New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson’s office, pulls data from the City’s Department of Investigations to pinpoint residential evictions across the five boroughs as a tool to guide advocates and policy makers conversation on how to slash the city’s eviction rate.”

The Star: Online registry aims to crowdsource tracking of Toronto evictions for landlords’ personal use

Kind of a limited scope, but I wanted to include it here because it’s not something I’ve seen often: Online registry aims to crowdsource tracking of Toronto evictions for landlords’ personal use. “A new crowdsourced online database aimed at tracking one of the only ways Ontario tenants in good standing can be evicted is drawing praise from a prominent tenants’ advocate, who says it can help determine if a landlord is abusing the process to jack up rent. But it’s also causing some alarm among landlords who fear the unverified information could be misinterpreted or used, itself, in bad faith.”

Digital Trends: These activists are hacking housing problems in NYC using apps and data

Digital Trends: These activists are hacking housing problems in NYC using apps and data . “These do-gooders informally identify as the Housing Data Coalition and consist of a variety of principled hacktivists who are building easy-to-use, intuitive tools that employ data as a weapon to combat illicit and unethical housing practices in a city that houses nearly 9 million people. They call their tools ‘civic technology’ and employ their skills in service of the people, not the landlords who prey on vulnerable populations.”

The Guardian: Government’s rogue landlord list empty after six months

The Guardian: Government’s rogue landlord list empty after six months. “The government’s new rogue landlord database was billed as a key tool for local councils to target the country’s worst landlords, but, more than six months after the system started, not a single name has been added – and even when some are added, the public will not be able to find out.”

Internet Outrage Pounding City Park Apartments Into Little Social Media Pancakes

You may remember over the weekend I linked to a story about an apartment complex that was requiring tenants to “Like” it on Facebook. It’s, um, not going well. “Another unsettling quirk: you had to let City Park Apartments post photos of you and your guests on its page, and you were not allowed to leave negative reviews on any public forum. The company’s Facebook page is already ‘unavailable’ after a torrent of negative reviews. It turns out local TV news station KSL picked the story up, and it floated its way to the AP and then every other website on the internet. And City Park Apartments’ Yelp profile is ‘under active cleanup,’ which is Yelp’s euphemism for ‘your business is currently being ground into a fine dust by unstoppable tank of internet outrage.'”