Wanted in Rome: Italy’s fascist landmarks mapped in new website

Wanted in Rome: Italy’s fascist landmarks mapped in new website. “An online map charting the existing monuments, buildings and memorials honouring fascism in Italy was launched on Tuesday by the Istituto Ferruccio Parri, an historical research institute in Milan. The luoghi del fascismo website is hailed as Italy’s first nationwide project to document the surviving traces of Benito Mussolini’s regime and assess how the memory of fascism has been preserved and even revived in recent decades.”

San Francisco Chronicle: Lost landmarks of the Bay Area

San Francisco Chronicle: Lost landmarks of the Bay Area. “In a city that has gone to war against sugary sodas, residents still took the 2020 loss of a Coca-Cola billboard hard, like someone was tearing down one of the Painted Ladies. When the Cliff House sign was removed — the art deco sign, not the actual Cliff House — hundreds arrived to mourn. So we’re building a virtual museum, tracking the most prominent lost landmarks of the last 50 years (including, sadly, more than a few that came down during the pandemic).”

The Post and Courier: South Carolina nonprofit creates archive of Palmetto State landmarks

New-to-me, and apparently revamped to all our benefit, from The Post and Courier: South Carolina nonprofit creates archive of Palmetto State landmarks. “Today, its website features entries on over 2,000 landmarks. Most are still standing, but the project also catalogues locations that have fallen to ruin or disappeared. In addition to photographs, entries include write-ups adding historical context to the sites, along with addresses, links to similar landmarks and information about any other notable places nearby.”

Pitchfork: Beatles’ Iconic Abbey Road Crosswalk Gets Repainted Because Nobody Is Outside

Pitchfork: Beatles’ Iconic Abbey Road Crosswalk Gets Repainted Because Nobody Is Outside. “A London municipal crew was able to repaint the crosswalk in front of Abbey Road Studios, where the Beatles shot the cover to their 1969 album. The area’s usual heavy foot traffic—which you can watch live on a webcam—has been drastically reduced by the city’s social-distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, which made the update possible according to NBC News.”

New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission: LPC Releases Story Map Highlighting 50 Years of Designations Associated with NYC’s Abolitionist History

From last month, but I just found out about it now. From the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission: LPC Releases Story Map Highlighting 50 Years of Designations Associated with NYC’s Abolitionist History. “New York City played an important role in the effort to abolish slavery nationwide, and to assist those seeking to escape it. In observation of the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to America, LPC wanted to bring greater awareness to the city’s abolitionist history by telling the story through designated landmarks that embody it. Through narrative text, images, maps, and multimedia content, the public can learn the important history behind these buildings.”

6sqft: New Historic Districts Council website lists every landmark in NYC

6sqft: New Historic Districts Council website lists every landmark in NYC. “Preservationists, advocates, history buffs and anyone interested in finding out about the history of New York City’s neighborhoods and landmarks has an exciting new resource at their fingertips. The Historic Districts Council (HDC) has launched a new website that offers a complete list of every historic district, individual landmark, interior landmark and scenic landmark in New York City.”

Google-Landmarks: A New Dataset and Challenge for Landmark Recognition (Google Research Blog)

Google Research Blog: Google-Landmarks: A New Dataset and Challenge for Landmark Recognition. “Today, we are excited to advance instance-level recognition by releasing Google-Landmarks, the largest worldwide dataset for recognition of human-made and natural landmarks. Google-Landmarks is being released as part of the Landmark Recognition and Landmark Retrieval Kaggle challenges, which will be the focus of the CVPR’18 Landmarks workshop. The dataset contains more than 2 million images depicting 30 thousand unique landmarks from across the world (their geographic distribution is presented below), a number of classes that is ~30x larger than what is available in commonly used datasets. Additionally, to spur research in this field, we are open-sourcing Deep Local Features (DELF), an attentive local feature descriptor that we believe is especially suited for this kind of task.”

GCN: Mapping NYC’s historic landmarks

GCN: Mapping NYC’s historic landmarks. “For 52 years, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has worked to protect the city’s rich architectural and cultural heritage by designating historic districts and individual, scenic and interior landmarks. Through an update to the LPC’s interactive map, Discover NYC Landmarks, users will be able to view detailed information on nearly 34,000 historic buildings within the city’s 141 historic districts.”

Science Daily: Social media photos priceless for natural resources research

Science Daily: Social media photos priceless for natural resources research “Tapping into social media posts on Instagram, Flickr and Panoramio gave North Carolina State University researchers a trove of information about people’s opinions of scenic European landscapes. A new study shows that geotagged photos — complete with millions of comments — can provide data for predictive models to help guide land use policy, conservation planning and development decisions worldwide.”

Chrome Extension Identifies Landmarks in YouTube Videos

Hey, this sounds pretty nifty: a Chrome extension which can identify landmarks in YouTube videos. “It’s easy to use. If you spot a landmark you don’t recognize, pause playback, click the Flico icon, then ‘Scan Landmarks’, and the add-on goes to work. We tried this with an image of Grauman’s Chinese Theater on Hollywood Boulevard, and within a few seconds Flico had given us the correct location, and the opening section of its Wikipedia page.”