Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them

Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them. “Neopronouns express a similar idea as they/them, but neopronouns are intentionally created to make pronouns that feel like home. Neopronouns like xe/xem/xeir and ze/zir/zirs also allow people to refer to folks in the third person without placing them in a gender binary — Xe is such an incredible writer, you think while reading an awesome book by a nonbinary human. Many more neopronouns exist than binary pronouns, and you can check out a list of neopronouns here.”

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American. “We invite you to dive in and explore a database of words that appeared prominently in the print history of Scientific American. Below, each year of that history is represented by a single word, which was selected through a text-analysis project that started with all 5,107 issues of the magazine. Words whose relative frequency peaked in each individual year were identified.”

TechRepublic: AI-powered tool aims to help reduce bias and racially charged language on websites

TechRepublic: AI-powered tool aims to help reduce bias and racially charged language on websites. “Website accessibility tech provider UserWay has released an AI-powered tool designed to help organizations ensure their websites are free from discriminatory, biased, and racially charged language. The tool, Content Moderator, flags content for review, and nothing is deleted or removed without approval from site administrators, according to UserWay.”

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media. “An investigation of Twitter messages reveals new insights and tools for studying how people use stretched words, such as ‘duuuuude,’ ‘heyyyyy,’ or ‘noooooooo.’ Tyler Gray and colleagues at the University of Vermont in Burlington present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 27, 2020.”

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows. “A team of researchers in part led by H. Andrew Schwartz, PhD, Assistant Professor of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, along with Sharath Chandra Guntuku, PhD, a research scientist in Penn Medicine’s Center for Digital Health, compared patients’ Facebook posts to their medical records, which showed that a shift to more formal language and/or descriptions of physical pain, among other changes, reliably preceded hospital visits.”

Garbage Language: Why do corporations speak the way they do? (Vulture)

Vulture: Garbage Language: Why do corporations speak the way they do?. “Garbage language isn’t unique to start-ups; it’s endemic to business itself, and the form it takes tends to reflect the operating economic metaphors of its day. A 1911 book by Frederick Winslow Taylor called The Principles of Scientific Management borrows its language from manufacturing; men, like machines, are useful for their output and productive capacity. The conglomeration of companies in the 1950s and ’60s required organizations to address alienated employees who felt faceless amid a sea of identical gray-suited toilers, and managers were encouraged to create a climate conducive to human growth and to focus on the self-actualization needs of their employees. In the 1980s, garbage language smelled strongly of Wall Street: leverage, stakeholder, value-add. The rise of big tech brought us computing and gaming metaphors: bandwidth, hack, the concept of double-clicking on something, the concept of talking off-line, the concept of leveling up.” Long but interesting.

Phys .org: The use of jargon kills people’s interest in science, politics

Phys .org: The use of jargon kills people’s interest in science, politics. “In a new study, people exposed to jargon when reading about subjects like self-driving cars and surgical robots later said they were less interested in science than others who read about the same topics, but without the use of specialized terms. They were also less likely to think they were good at science, felt less informed about science and felt less qualified to discuss science topics.”

Games Are Discovering an Expressive New Tool: Internet Grammar (EGM)

EGM: Games Are Discovering an Expressive New Tool: Internet Grammar. “Last year, Gretchen McCulloch published her book Because Internet: Understanding How Language is Changing. ‘We write all the time now,’ she points out, ‘and most of what we’re writing is informal. [There is] a vast sea of unedited, unfiltered words that once might have only been spoken.’ Not only has this constant use of informal written language meant we need ways to inject tone into text, it’s allowed for it by opening up who’s writing and why. Grammar is no longer prescribed by books and formal articles, McCulloch argues. It’s created by all of us.”

Genealogy 101: Using the Dictionary of American Regional English for Genealogy (GenealogyBank)

GenealogyBank: Genealogy 101: Using the Dictionary of American Regional English for Genealogy. “In this article – part of an ongoing ‘Introduction to Genealogy’ series – Gena Philibert-Ortega describes a helpful resource for genealogists, the ‘Dictionary of American Regional English,’ and how it can help with your family history research. Gena is a genealogist and author of the book ‘From the Family Kitchen.'”

Wired: ‘Boomerspeak’ Is Now Available for Your Parodying Pleasure

Wired: ‘Boomerspeak’ Is Now Available for Your Parodying Pleasure . “In 2019, young people learned how to talk like boomers. It showed up in tweets (‘why do boomers all have such a strange relationship with capitalization and punctuation’), on Reddit (‘On my first ever Facebook post to a friend’s wall, I signed my name like some kind of boomer’), and people who type ‘ok boomer’ as “O.K., Boomer.” There’s a Facebook group where people pretend to be boomers, which consists of typing things like ‘say hi to Joe and the kids for me,,, love! You.’ “

ABA Journal: New tool by Harvard Law lets people explore language usage in caselaw

ABA Journal: New tool by Harvard Law lets people explore language usage in caselaw. “Parsing 6.7 million federal and state cases and 12 billion words, a new tool allows the public to explore the use of language over 360 years of caselaw. Released Wednesday, ‘Historical Trends’ was built by the Harvard Law School Library Innovation Lab and is free to use.”

The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis. “A machine-learning method discovered a hidden clue in people’s language predictive of the later emergence of psychosis — the frequent use of words associated with sound. A paper published by the journal npj Schizophrenia published the findings by scientists at Emory University and Harvard University. The researchers also developed a new machine-learning method to more precisely quantify the semantic richness of people’s conversational language, a known indicator for psychosis.”

Phys .org: Canadians’ and Americans’ Twitter language mirrors national stereotypes, researchers find

Phys. org: Canadians’ and Americans’ Twitter language mirrors national stereotypes, researchers find. “A new study examining differences in the language used in nearly 40-million tweets suggests national stereotypes—Canadians tend to be polite and nice while Americans are negative and assertive—are reflected on Twitter, even if those stereotypes aren’t necessarily accurate.”

Penn Today: Linguistic red flags from Facebook posts can predict future depression diagnoses

Penn Today: Linguistic red flags from Facebook posts can predict future depression diagnoses. “In any given year, depression affects more than 6 percent of the adult population in the United States—some 16 million people—but fewer than half receive the treatment they need. What if an algorithm could scan social media and point to linguistic red flags of the disease before a formal medical diagnosis had been made? New research from the University of Pennsylvania and Stony Brook University published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows this is now more plausible than ever.”

Nautilus: The Euclidean Metrics of Trump’s Twitter Account

Nautilus: The Euclidean Metrics of Trump’s Twitter Account. “Using simple linguistic criteria such as these in combination with an array of sentiment lexicons, James Pennebaker and his team at the University of Texas have developed a sentiment tool, linguistic inquiry and word count (LIWC) that can quantify an author’s personality along a range of dimensions, including positivity, anxiety, depression, anger, affability, social engagement, arrogance, enthusiasm, logicality, topicality, and self-absorption. An online version…allows users to affectively profile a Twitter personality of their choosing by entering the corresponding Twitter handle.”