Slator: Searchable Database Gives Users an Overview of Language Policies in Europe

New-to-me, from Slator: Searchable Database Gives Users an Overview of Language Policies in Europe. “The database, called the European Language Monitor (ELM), is searchable for topics such as what language regulations and technologies exist in an EU member country. It is currently divided into four databases according to years of data collection. The goal, to provide up-to-date, ‘qualitative and quantitative data, links to rulings and legislation and other types of documentation.’”

Mind Matters News: How A Searchable Database Is Helping Decipher A Lost Language

Mind Matters News: How A Searchable Database Is Helping Decipher A Lost Language. “There was once a flourishing civilization on the island of Crete called the Minoan culture (3000–11100 B.C.). Two languages are associated with it, Minoan A and, later, Minoan B. Minoan B was deciphered but Minoan A has remained a mystery that has ‘tormented linguists for many decades,’ as Patricia Klaus puts it. Deciphering it would give us a window back as far as 1800 BC.”

CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?

CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?. “You might have noticed the word ‘cheugy’ popping up online and wondered what it means and how to pronounce it. New slang is a surefire way to make you question your fleeting youth. In this case, that couldn’t be more true. In short, cheugy is a trendy way to say something is passe, and the word’s having a moment on TikTok, where folks are busy labeling what’s cheugy, having existential crises over being cheugy or just embracing life as a cheug.” Oh, so, like, someone who listens to disco and says “groovy” all the time?… oh. >cough

Science Magazine: Want other scientists to cite you? Drop the jargon

Science Magazine: Want other scientists to cite you? Drop the jargon. “If you want your work to be highly cited, here’s one simple tip that might help: Steer clear of discipline-specific jargon in the title and abstract. That’s the conclusion of a new study of roughly 20,000 published papers about cave science, a multidisciplinary field that includes researchers who study the biology, geology, paleontology, and anthropology of caves. The most highly cited papers didn’t use any terms specific to cave science in the title and kept jargon to less than 2% of the text in the abstract; jargon-heavy papers were cited far less often.”

Moscow Times: Russians Post More Profanities After Social Media Swearing Ban

Moscow Times: Russians Post More Profanities After Social Media Swearing Ban. “Russian-speaking social media users have posted 10% more profanity-laced content in the two months since a law requiring platforms to delete them came into force than before, the RBC news website reported Sunday. The Medialogia media monitor tallied 20.2 million posts containing swear words on Facebook, TikTok, YouTube, Instagram and Twitter, as well as three Russian platforms, from Feb. 1-March 31.”

PR Newswire: Dictionary. com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com today announced its latest addition of new words, which reflects the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on language and hits on a variety of additional themes relating to race, social justice, identity, and culture. The leading online dictionary has updated 7,600 entries, including 450 new entries and 94 new definitions in existing entries.”

Google’s definition of not including bum as ‘private part’ may not be acceptable in Indian context: Mumbai Court (GoaChronicle)

GoaChronicle: Google’s definition of not including bum as ‘private part’ may not be acceptable in Indian context: Mumbai Court. “Clarifying that ‘the term private part is to be interpreted into the context what is meant by it in our society,’ the Court held that Google’s definition of not including bum in private part may not be an acceptable interpretation as far as Indians are concerned.”

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words. “COMEDIAN GEORGE CARLIN had a list of Seven Words You Can’t Say on TV. Parts of the internet have a list of 402 banned words, plus one emoji, 🖕. Slack uses the open source List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words, found on GitHub, to help groom its search suggestions. Open source mapping project OpenStreetMap uses it to sanitize map edits. Google artificial intelligence researchers recently removed web pages containing any of the words from a dataset used to train a powerful new system for making sense of language.”

Phys .org: Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’

Phys .org: Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’. “Multi-disciplinary researchers at The University of Manchester have helped develop a powerful physics-based tool to map the pace of language development and human innovation over thousands of years—even stretching into pre-history before records were kept.”

Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.

I’m not 100% sure why I’m including this story. I think it’s a combination of interest in the idea that misinformation turns up in the oddest places, and an interest in how it’s refuted by crowd action. Anyway, Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.. “Languages evolve constantly. I’ve discussed this evolution in past articles – e.g., the drift from ‘nippon’ to ‘nihon’ for the name of Japan. Many times, this influence is just a natural, internal progression. But sometimes, it happens through outside influence or even force. In Japan, one story about a supposed forced change in the way that people spell a simple Japanese word recently made the rounds on Twitter. However, in this case, the ‘change’ appears to be nothing more than a post-World War II conspiracy theory.”

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one. “For the first time, the Oxford English Dictionary has chosen not to name a word of the year, describing 2020 as ‘a year which cannot be neatly accommodated in one single word’. Instead, from ‘unmute’ to ‘mail-in’, and from ‘coronavirus’ to ‘lockdown’, the eminent reference work has announced its ‘words of an “unprecedented” year’.”