Bitcoin News: Decryptionary Helps New Investors Understand Crypto Terms

Bitcoin News: Decryptionary Helps New Investors Understand Crypto Terms. “Decryptionary provides concise definitions of many terms that are widely used in the crypto industry. You have the option to look up a specific word or phrase relating to cryptocurrencies and distributed ledgers using the site’s search bar. Alternatively, you can access the full contents of the online dictionary where entries are listed by first letter or number.”

Lifehacker: Learn New Teen Slang Through This Gen Z Glossary

Lifehacker: Learn New Teen Slang Through This Gen Z Glossary. “Oh, hello, there. I am just brushing up on my Gen Z vocabulary, thanks to this glossary shared on Twitter by a high school teacher named James Callahan. Apparently, he had been keeping a running spreadsheet of the new slang terms he would learn from his students. This week, a kid from his class tweeted screenshots of it, and then that tweet went viral, and then Callahan gave the world a gift by making the whole document public.”

500 Days of Duolingo: What You Can (and Can’t) Learn From a Language App (New York Times)

New York Times: 500 Days of Duolingo: What You Can (and Can’t) Learn From a Language App . “If mobile language-learning apps are to be believed, it’s never been easier to pick up another language. Just spend 20 minutes a day with a few virtual flashcards and you’ll be fluent in no time! The reality is a lot more nuanced — and arguably more disappointing — than that.”

Phys .org: New research helps visualise sentiment and stance in social media

Phys .org: New research helps visualise sentiment and stance in social media. “How can you find and make sense of opinions and emotions in the vast amount of texts in social media? Kostiantyn Kucher’s research helps visualise for instance public opinions on political issues in tweets over time. In the future, analysis and visualisation of sentiment and stance could contribute to such tasks as detection of hate speech and fake news.”

Merriam-Webster: We Added New Words to the Dictionary in April 2019

Merriam-Webster: We Added New Words to the Dictionary in April 2019. “The English language never sleeps, and neither does the dictionary. The work of revising a dictionary is constant, and it mirrors the culture’s need to make sense of the world with words. There are always new things to be named and new uses for existing words to be explained. A release of new words is also a map of the workings of a dictionary—you get to see what we’ve been up to—and of how words from different contexts come to reside in the same place.”

Texts as networks: How many words are sufficient to identify an author? (Phys .org)

Phys. org: Texts as networks: How many words are sufficient to identify an author?. “People are more original than they think—this is suggested by a literary text analysis method of stylometry proposed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences. The author’s individuality can be seen in the connections between no more than a dozen words in an English text. It turns out that in Slavic languages, authorship identification requires even fewer words, and is more certain.”

CNET: Dictionary. com inches closer to explaining the enigma of Gen Z’s vocabulary

CNET: Dictionary. com inches closer to explaining the enigma of Gen Z’s vocabulary. “Dictionary.com added more than 300 new words and phrases on Wednesday, including a few tech-related entries like ‘textlationship’ (when people text a lot but don’t really interact in person) and ‘keyboard warrior’ (someone who shares opinionated content online in an aggressive or abusive way, typically without revealing who they are). “