Moscow Times: Russians Post More Profanities After Social Media Swearing Ban

Moscow Times: Russians Post More Profanities After Social Media Swearing Ban. “Russian-speaking social media users have posted 10% more profanity-laced content in the two months since a law requiring platforms to delete them came into force than before, the RBC news website reported Sunday. The Medialogia media monitor tallied 20.2 million posts containing swear words on Facebook, TikTok, YouTube, Instagram and Twitter, as well as three Russian platforms, from Feb. 1-March 31.”

PR Newswire: Dictionary. com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com today announced its latest addition of new words, which reflects the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on language and hits on a variety of additional themes relating to race, social justice, identity, and culture. The leading online dictionary has updated 7,600 entries, including 450 new entries and 94 new definitions in existing entries.”

Google’s definition of not including bum as ‘private part’ may not be acceptable in Indian context: Mumbai Court (GoaChronicle)

GoaChronicle: Google’s definition of not including bum as ‘private part’ may not be acceptable in Indian context: Mumbai Court. “Clarifying that ‘the term private part is to be interpreted into the context what is meant by it in our society,’ the Court held that Google’s definition of not including bum in private part may not be an acceptable interpretation as far as Indians are concerned.”

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words. “COMEDIAN GEORGE CARLIN had a list of Seven Words You Can’t Say on TV. Parts of the internet have a list of 402 banned words, plus one emoji, 🖕. Slack uses the open source List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words, found on GitHub, to help groom its search suggestions. Open source mapping project OpenStreetMap uses it to sanitize map edits. Google artificial intelligence researchers recently removed web pages containing any of the words from a dataset used to train a powerful new system for making sense of language.”

Phys .org: Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’

Phys .org: Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’. “Multi-disciplinary researchers at The University of Manchester have helped develop a powerful physics-based tool to map the pace of language development and human innovation over thousands of years—even stretching into pre-history before records were kept.”

Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.

I’m not 100% sure why I’m including this story. I think it’s a combination of interest in the idea that misinformation turns up in the oddest places, and an interest in how it’s refuted by crowd action. Anyway, Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.. “Languages evolve constantly. I’ve discussed this evolution in past articles – e.g., the drift from ‘nippon’ to ‘nihon’ for the name of Japan. Many times, this influence is just a natural, internal progression. But sometimes, it happens through outside influence or even force. In Japan, one story about a supposed forced change in the way that people spell a simple Japanese word recently made the rounds on Twitter. However, in this case, the ‘change’ appears to be nothing more than a post-World War II conspiracy theory.”

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one. “For the first time, the Oxford English Dictionary has chosen not to name a word of the year, describing 2020 as ‘a year which cannot be neatly accommodated in one single word’. Instead, from ‘unmute’ to ‘mail-in’, and from ‘coronavirus’ to ‘lockdown’, the eminent reference work has announced its ‘words of an “unprecedented” year’.”

NiemanLab: ProPublica experiments with ultra-accessible plain language in stories about people with disabilities

NiemanLab: ProPublica experiments with ultra-accessible plain language in stories about people with disabilities. “For an investigation into denied disability benefits in Arizona and an accompanying editor’s note, ProPublica is experimenting with plain language — a type of text that uses common words, short sentences, and clear structure to make information more accessible to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Edex Live: How this social media project aims to replace misogynistic and casteist slurs across Indian languages

Edex Live: How this social media project aims to replace misogynistic and casteist slurs across Indian languages. “Have you ever thought about how misogynistic and casteist most verbal abuses are? While it might feel cathartic and release some pent up frustration, slang, more often than not, is derogatory and insulting. But, we also understand that there’s a need to release some of that frustration when things really get tough. So do Tamanna Mishra and Neha Thakur. And that is why the duo began an initiative called The Gaali Project in the first week of September. The initiative aims to replace these swear words with misogynistic undertones.”

Europeana Pro: Exploring new resources in CLARIN’s Virtual Language Observatory

Europeana Pro: Exploring new resources in CLARIN’s Virtual Language Observatory. “Since 2017, CLARIN and Europeana have worked together to increase the number of cultural heritage objects available for quick and easy discovery as well as processing by humanities and social sciences scholars. In this post, we take a look at the new resources integrated into CLARIN’s Virtual Language Observatory.”

Wired: Metaphors Matter in a Time of Pandemic

Wired: Metaphors Matter in a Time of Pandemic. “The image of maces or robots bearing spikes and cracking open our cells does at first conjure a military attack. Indeed Bill Gates has said we ought to have prepared for a pandemic as if for armed conflict. In March, Donald Trump dubbed himself a ‘wartime president.’ More recently, military veterans have urged people enduring the Covid-19 contagion to think like prisoners of war. But Scott Knowles, a disaster expert who runs the history department at Drexel, is wary of martial language.”

Emergency Medicine News: De-eponymizing Anatomical Terminology

Emergency Medicine News: De-eponymizing Anatomical Terminology . “After a recent Twitter debate, we set out to evaluate the hypothesis that there is always an alternative to a dead man’s name for body parts and to create an online searchable database … to facilitate the de-eponymization of anatomic terminology. We reviewed 700 normal… anatomical and histological eponyms, and developed a searchable database modelled on the 2019 edition of Terminologia Anatomica (TA2) published by the Federative International Programme for Anatomical Terminology (FIPAT).” It’s probably inferable but let me make clear that an eponym is something named after a person. Like Alzheimer’s disease.

Harvard Business Review: The Next Big Breakthrough in AI Will Be Around Language

Harvard Business Review: The Next Big Breakthrough in AI Will Be Around Language. “The 2010s produced breakthroughs in vision-enabled technologies, from accurate image searches on the web to computer vision systems for medical image analysis or for detecting defective parts in manufacturing and assembly, as we described extensively in our book and research. GPT3, developed by OpenAI, indicates that the 2020s will be about major advances in language-based AI tasks.”