CNN: Twitter is removing ‘master,’ ‘slave’ and ‘blacklist’ from its code

CNN: Twitter is removing ‘master,’ ‘slave’ and ‘blacklist’ from its code. “The language of computing is changing in the wake of the death of George Floyd. Twitter is dropping the terms ‘master,’ ‘slave’ and ‘blacklist’ from its code after two engineers lobbied for the use of more inclusive programming language. America’s biggest bank, JPMorgan Chase (JPM), is taking similar steps, according to media reports.”

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Archives as resources for revitalizing First Nations languages

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Archives as resources for revitalizing First Nations languages. “Since colonial contact, government policies have caused the displacement and separation of our people from their families, communities, lands and languages. Attempts at assimilation, such as the establishment of residential schools and the ongoing Millennium Scoop, have distanced multiple generations from their languages and cultures. Canada recognizes only English and French as official languages. First Nations communities have therefore taken leadership in ensuring that their languages are maintained, relearned and passed down. The decline in the natural inheritance of language through kinship has led to the rise of language-preservation and language-revitalization projects.”

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions . “If you don’t know what Tendercake means then it is a cake or filling typically made with the flattened piece of fruit and cake eaten dry, according to an AI web tool that’s specifically designed to make up words. The website where the AI is located doesn’t only make up words, but also provides context through meaningless definitions and examples that makes them sound authentic. This is the just the latest example of how artificial intelligence is being used for new and novel purposes.”

New Zealand Herald: The 11 words most commonly misspelled in Google searches

New Zealand Herald: The 11 words most commonly misspelled in Google searches. “‘Separate’ is the most misspelled word on Google, according to data that analysed searches from around the world in the past year. The most common misspelling of the word is ‘seperate’ which was searched 92,000 times in the past month alone.”

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media. “An investigation of Twitter messages reveals new insights and tools for studying how people use stretched words, such as ‘duuuuude,’ ‘heyyyyy,’ or ‘noooooooo.’ Tyler Gray and colleagues at the University of Vermont in Burlington present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 27, 2020.”

TimeOut: You can now learn German online with a world-leading cultural institute

TimeOut: You can now learn German online with a world-leading cultural institute. “Guten Tag! If your German knowledge ends there, then you’ll be glad to know that the world famous cultural association, the Goethe-Institut, is moving all of its German language courses online in response to the Covid-19 crisis which has shuttered its in-person tuition.”

COVID-19: What’s A Covidiot? Why’s It Trending On Social Media? (Pelham Daily Voice)

Pelham Daily Voice: COVID-19: What’s A Covidiot? Why’s It Trending On Social Media?. “The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has led to sweeping changes across the country, and now, even a new term: ‘covidiot.’ According to Urban Dictionary, a covidiot is ‘someone who ignores the warnings regarding public health or safety. A person who hoards goods, denying them from their neighbors.'”

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows. “A team of researchers in part led by H. Andrew Schwartz, PhD, Assistant Professor of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, along with Sharath Chandra Guntuku, PhD, a research scientist in Penn Medicine’s Center for Digital Health, compared patients’ Facebook posts to their medical records, which showed that a shift to more formal language and/or descriptions of physical pain, among other changes, reliably preceded hospital visits.”

South China Morning Post: Malaysian Instagram slang bank creates a graphic archive of the country’s unique urban language

South China Morning Post: Malaysian Instagram slang bank creates a graphic archive of the country’s unique urban language. “Loading” according to the Cambridge dictionary is defined as putting goods onto a vehicle, or in finance it means a charge added to an investment. But to Malaysians, since the arrival of the internet, ‘loading’ refers to someone slowly processing information. This is one of the 300 Malaysian slang terms posted so far on the on MySlangBank Instagram account, an archive of urban language made famous by social media and terms already woven into the country’s culture and identity.”

Garbage Language: Why do corporations speak the way they do? (Vulture)

Vulture: Garbage Language: Why do corporations speak the way they do?. “Garbage language isn’t unique to start-ups; it’s endemic to business itself, and the form it takes tends to reflect the operating economic metaphors of its day. A 1911 book by Frederick Winslow Taylor called The Principles of Scientific Management borrows its language from manufacturing; men, like machines, are useful for their output and productive capacity. The conglomeration of companies in the 1950s and ’60s required organizations to address alienated employees who felt faceless amid a sea of identical gray-suited toilers, and managers were encouraged to create a climate conducive to human growth and to focus on the self-actualization needs of their employees. In the 1980s, garbage language smelled strongly of Wall Street: leverage, stakeholder, value-add. The rise of big tech brought us computing and gaming metaphors: bandwidth, hack, the concept of double-clicking on something, the concept of talking off-line, the concept of leveling up.” Long but interesting.

KHON: Creative couple comes together to create Hawaiian-language themed cartoon

KHON: Creative couple comes together to create Hawaiian-language themed cartoon. “A creative couple used their family as inspiration for a passion project that teaches kids about island culture. Mom is a singer, dad a graphic designer. They merged their creativity to create a labor of love: Makaʻiwa Keiki.” It’s a YouTube channel to teach kids Hawaiian language. I can easily imagine absentmindedly singing the counting to ten song, but I’ll have to play the ʻHead-Shoulders-Knees-and-Toesʻ Song at quarter-speed to learn to say “toes.”

Phys .org: The use of jargon kills people’s interest in science, politics

Phys .org: The use of jargon kills people’s interest in science, politics. “In a new study, people exposed to jargon when reading about subjects like self-driving cars and surgical robots later said they were less interested in science than others who read about the same topics, but without the use of specialized terms. They were also less likely to think they were good at science, felt less informed about science and felt less qualified to discuss science topics.”

Science: World’s largest linguistics database is getting too expensive for some researchers

Science: World’s largest linguistics database is getting too expensive for some researchers. “To help cover its nearly $1 million in annual operating costs, Ethnologue got its first paywall in late 2015; most nonpaying visitors were turned away after several pages. Since October 2019, the paywall has taken a new form: It lets visitors access every page, but it blots out information on how many speakers a language has and where they live. Subscriptions now start at $480 per person per year.”

CNET: Baby Yoda makes it onto Dictionary. com’s list of new slang

CNET: Baby Yoda makes it onto Dictionary.com’s list of new slang. “If you’ve been living under a rock for the last few months and want to find out who Baby Yoda is, you can now look him up in the dictionary. Dictionary.com on Wednesday unveiled a list of new slang additions, which include OK boomer, VSCO girl and cancel culture.”