CBR: James Gunn, Merriam-Webster Come to a Consensus on How to Spell ‘Asshat’

CBR: James Gunn, Merriam-Webster Come to a Consensus on How to Spell ‘Asshat’. “Writer/director James Gunn recently reached out to the internet for help with a project he’s currently writing. While he wouldn’t name the script he needed it for, Gunn asked his followers on Twitter how they prefer to spell the word ‘asshat’. He claimed that the poll settled the matter forever — and the Merriam-Webster dictionary backed him up.”

CNN: This 23-year-old Nigerian is creating a digital collection of African stories for children in different languages

CNN: This 23-year-old Nigerian is creating a digital collection of African stories for children in different languages. “In May, with help from two friends, Fanan and Tolulope, [Dominic] Onyekachi launched Akiddie, a web-based platform providing access to African storybooks for children like his niece. Akiddie features storybooks based on African history and characters for children in different languages.”

Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them

Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them. “Neopronouns express a similar idea as they/them, but neopronouns are intentionally created to make pronouns that feel like home. Neopronouns like xe/xem/xeir and ze/zir/zirs also allow people to refer to folks in the third person without placing them in a gender binary — Xe is such an incredible writer, you think while reading an awesome book by a nonbinary human. Many more neopronouns exist than binary pronouns, and you can check out a list of neopronouns here.”

Gulf Today: Sharjah spearheads huge project to chronicle 17 centuries of Arabic

Gulf Today: Sharjah spearheads huge project to chronicle 17 centuries of Arabic. “Heralding a new era for the Arabic language lexicon, Sharjah has embarked on a landmark project to chronicle 17 centuries of development in the Arabic language spanning five distinct time periods. The Historical Corpus of the Arabic Language is a monumental undertaking that will offer unparalleled insight into the world’s fifth most widely spoken language and serve as a linguistic resource for researchers, academia, linguists and students worldwide.” Sharjah is a city in the United Arab Emirates.

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American. “We invite you to dive in and explore a database of words that appeared prominently in the print history of Scientific American. Below, each year of that history is represented by a single word, which was selected through a text-analysis project that started with all 5,107 issues of the magazine. Words whose relative frequency peaked in each individual year were identified.”

TechRepublic: AI-powered tool aims to help reduce bias and racially charged language on websites

TechRepublic: AI-powered tool aims to help reduce bias and racially charged language on websites. “Website accessibility tech provider UserWay has released an AI-powered tool designed to help organizations ensure their websites are free from discriminatory, biased, and racially charged language. The tool, Content Moderator, flags content for review, and nothing is deleted or removed without approval from site administrators, according to UserWay.”

News18: Maskhole, After Covidiots, is the Best Word to Define People with Reckless Behaviour in Pandemic

News18: Maskhole, After Covidiots, is the Best Word to Define People with Reckless Behaviour in Pandemic. “Four months into the lockdown and continuous messages on how to be safe, the mask is still not finding its place. And now we do have a word for such people who defeat the purpose of masks. Maskhole is the word that The New Yorker has devised for such individuals.”

CNN: Twitter is removing ‘master,’ ‘slave’ and ‘blacklist’ from its code

CNN: Twitter is removing ‘master,’ ‘slave’ and ‘blacklist’ from its code. “The language of computing is changing in the wake of the death of George Floyd. Twitter is dropping the terms ‘master,’ ‘slave’ and ‘blacklist’ from its code after two engineers lobbied for the use of more inclusive programming language. America’s biggest bank, JPMorgan Chase (JPM), is taking similar steps, according to media reports.”

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Archives as resources for revitalizing First Nations languages

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Archives as resources for revitalizing First Nations languages. “Since colonial contact, government policies have caused the displacement and separation of our people from their families, communities, lands and languages. Attempts at assimilation, such as the establishment of residential schools and the ongoing Millennium Scoop, have distanced multiple generations from their languages and cultures. Canada recognizes only English and French as official languages. First Nations communities have therefore taken leadership in ensuring that their languages are maintained, relearned and passed down. The decline in the natural inheritance of language through kinship has led to the rise of language-preservation and language-revitalization projects.”

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions . “If you don’t know what Tendercake means then it is a cake or filling typically made with the flattened piece of fruit and cake eaten dry, according to an AI web tool that’s specifically designed to make up words. The website where the AI is located doesn’t only make up words, but also provides context through meaningless definitions and examples that makes them sound authentic. This is the just the latest example of how artificial intelligence is being used for new and novel purposes.”

New Zealand Herald: The 11 words most commonly misspelled in Google searches

New Zealand Herald: The 11 words most commonly misspelled in Google searches. “‘Separate’ is the most misspelled word on Google, according to data that analysed searches from around the world in the past year. The most common misspelling of the word is ‘seperate’ which was searched 92,000 times in the past month alone.”

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media

Science Codex: Exploring the use of ‘stretchable’ words in social media. “An investigation of Twitter messages reveals new insights and tools for studying how people use stretched words, such as ‘duuuuude,’ ‘heyyyyy,’ or ‘noooooooo.’ Tyler Gray and colleagues at the University of Vermont in Burlington present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 27, 2020.”

TimeOut: You can now learn German online with a world-leading cultural institute

TimeOut: You can now learn German online with a world-leading cultural institute. “Guten Tag! If your German knowledge ends there, then you’ll be glad to know that the world famous cultural association, the Goethe-Institut, is moving all of its German language courses online in response to the Covid-19 crisis which has shuttered its in-person tuition.”