The Daily Universe: BYU Law creates language database to help interpret Constitution

The Daily Universe: BYU Law creates language database to help interpret Constitution. BYU is Brigham Young University. “This database is called the Corpus of Founding Era American English, also known as COFEA. ‘Corpus’ refers to a collection of written texts on a particular subject. The corpus holds founding-era documents that can be used by legal professionals for free as a tool to make educated legal decisions.”

BBC: Simples, whatevs and Jedi added to Oxford English Dictionary

BBC: Simples, whatevs and Jedi added to Oxford English Dictionary. “Whatevs, simples, chillax, sumfin and Jafaican have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary. They are among 203 new words which appear in the dictionary for the very first time. Other words which are part of the October 2019 update include Jedi, nomophobia and easy-breezy.” And omnishambles!

Columbia Journalism Review: The new Merriam-Webster words

Columbia Journalism Review: The new Merriam-Webster words. “LAST WEEK, MERRIAM-WEBSTER inflamed the language world again by adding 533 new words to its dictionary. As usual, the new entries are a mixture of new words and new definitions for words that already existed. Some come of the words from popular culture, some from science, some from business, and some from out of someone’s hat.”

The Courier: Explore Innergourie, Meffen and Scoun on new interactive Scots language map

The Courier: Explore Innergourie, Meffen and Scoun on new interactive Scots language map. “After two years of sifting through old documents, poems and audio recordings, the Scots Language Centre (SLC) unveiled its first digital map of Scotland at a ceremony in Perth. All place names are written in Scots, showing how the mother tongue has changed over the centuries.”

Wired: What Happened to Urban Dictionary?

Wired: What Happened to Urban Dictionary?. “The site, now in its 20th year, is a digital repository that contains more than 8 million definitions and famously houses all manner of slang and cultural expressions. Founded by Aaron Peckham in 1999—then a computer science major at Cal Poly—Urban Dictionary became notorious for allowing what sanctioned linguistic gatekeepers, such as the Oxford English Dictionary and Merriam-Webster, would not: a plurality of voice. In interviews, Peckham has said the site began as a joke, as a way to mock Dictionary.com, but it eventually ballooned into a thriving corpus.”

Adland: Google bans British greasy spoon café ad, for advertising their faggots and peas.

Adland: Google bans British greasy spoon café ad, for advertising their faggots and peas.. “You see, there’s a little café called ‘Fanny’s Rest Stop’ in Newport, which despite their terrible taste in fonts and eclectic 50-diner-ish furniture, serves all the classics that a proper greasy spoon in the UK should. The owner, Jo Evans-Pring, enlisted her friend Chris Barnbrook for help setting up her online presence, to promote her business and advertise. Things were going quite well, with new customers dropping in and business picking up, until one day an ad was unceremoniously rejected.” I thought a “faggot” was a bundle of sticks, and it is, but it’s also apparently a kind of meatball.