La Prensa Latina: Sao Paulo’s Portuguese language museum returns 6 years after devastating fire

La Prensa Latina: Sao Paulo’s Portuguese language museum returns 6 years after devastating fire. “The Museum of the Portuguese Language, an institution housed in this Brazilian metropolis’ Estacao da Luz station, went up in flames in late 2015. It is now opening its doors to the public once again six years later in the heart of Sao Paulo, offering a historically rich and socially inclusive tour of the world’s fifth-most widely spoken language.”

The National (Scotland): Gaelic dictionary project uncovers traditional Scottish healing methods

The National (Scotland): Gaelic dictionary project uncovers traditional Scottish healing methods. “RESEARCHERS for a Gaelic dictionary discovered more than just words when they carried out the second phase of their language project. Inter-university partnership Faclair na Gaidhlig and Gaelic audio recordings catalogue Tobar an Dualchais (TAD) focused on 1200 audio recordings, and it wasn’t long before a considerable number of words were relating to the same subject.”

Slator: Searchable Database Gives Users an Overview of Language Policies in Europe

New-to-me, from Slator: Searchable Database Gives Users an Overview of Language Policies in Europe. “The database, called the European Language Monitor (ELM), is searchable for topics such as what language regulations and technologies exist in an EU member country. It is currently divided into four databases according to years of data collection. The goal, to provide up-to-date, ‘qualitative and quantitative data, links to rulings and legislation and other types of documentation.’”

Business Insider India: Karnataka government issues legal notice to Google after search results showed Kannada as the ‘ugliest language’ in India

Business Insider India: Karnataka government issues legal notice to Google after search results showed Kannada as the ‘ugliest language’ in India. “Kannada as answer to a query in Google on ugliest language in India sparked an outrage on Thursday and the Karnataka government said it would issue a legal notice to the tech leader, while that reply appeared to be a gaffe. With people expressing their indignation and leaders cutting across party lines slamming Google, it quickly removed Kannada ‘as the ugliest language in India’ and apologised to the people saying the search result did not reflect its opinion.”

Mind Matters News: How A Searchable Database Is Helping Decipher A Lost Language

Mind Matters News: How A Searchable Database Is Helping Decipher A Lost Language. “There was once a flourishing civilization on the island of Crete called the Minoan culture (3000–11100 B.C.). Two languages are associated with it, Minoan A and, later, Minoan B. Minoan B was deciphered but Minoan A has remained a mystery that has ‘tormented linguists for many decades,’ as Patricia Klaus puts it. Deciphering it would give us a window back as far as 1800 BC.”

Engadget: Google’s AI photo app uses crowdsourcing to preserve endangered languages

Engadget: Google’s AI photo app uses crowdsourcing to preserve endangered languages. “Google has a new way to preserve endangered languages: give cultures the AI tools they need to protect the languages themselves. The company has launched Woolaroo, an open source photo translation web app (also available through Google Arts & Culture for Android and iOS) that uses machine learning and image recognition to help preserve languages on the brink. As a user, you just have to point your phone’s camera at an object to have the AI recognize and describe it in a given language, complete with pronunciation.”

Tubefilter: YouTube Testing Language Dubbing Tool, Enabling Viewers To Toggle Between Multiple ‘Audio Tracks’

Tubefilter: YouTube Testing Language Dubbing Tool, Enabling Viewers To Toggle Between Multiple ‘Audio Tracks’. “A YouTube spokesperson confirms to Tubefilter that the platform is piloting a new feature among a small group of creators that allows them to upload multiple ‘Audio Tracks‘ to a single video — which viewers can then toggle between.”

University of Oklahoma: University Libraries Acquires Award-Winning Translator’s Archive

University of Oklahoma: University Libraries Acquires Award-Winning Translator’s Archive. “University Libraries’ Chinese Literature Translation Archive has recently acquired noted Scottish translator Brian Holton’s translation archive. These works include a treasure-trove of material on Holton’s translation of Classical Chinese poetry into both English and Scots (Holton is the lone translator of Chinese into Scots) as well as over two decades of hand-written correspondence, draft material, and other important historical documents that reveal the foundation of his partnership with contemporary Chinese poet Yang Lian.”

The Scotsman: Artists, poets and language lovers speak out as they face a torrent of online abuse for speaking Scots

The Scotsman: Artists, poets and language lovers speak out as they face a torrent of online abuse for speaking Scots. “Scottish folk singer Iona Fyfe writes and performs in the Scots language. She explained that she doesn’t receive much abuse for her music, despite singing in Scots, but when she speaks or writes social media updates in the language, that’s when her Twitter feed is hit hard.”

Slate: Non-English Editions of Wikipedia Have a Misinformation Problem

Slate: Non-English Editions of Wikipedia Have a Misinformation Problem . “During World War II, Unit 731 of the Japanese military undertook horrific medical experimentation in Manchukuo (Northeast China). Among other things, members of Unit 731 intentionally infected people with the plague as part of an effort to develop bioweapons. The unit’s crimes have been well documented. But if you read the Japanese Wikipedia page on Unit 731 in January, you wouldn’t get the full story. The article said that it is ‘a theory’ that human experiments actually took place. It was just one example of the whitewashing of war crimes on Japanese Wikipedia, as I discovered when I was researching the war.”

Boston University: World’s Largest American Sign Language Database Makes ASL Even More Accessible

Boston University: World’s Largest American Sign Language Database Makes ASL Even More Accessible. “The words ‘joke’ and ‘ruin’ might not rhyme in English. But, thanks to a new, interactive database of American Sign Language (ASL), called ASL-LEX 2.0, we can now see that these two words do in fact rhyme in ASL….Since launching in February 2021, in conjunction with a published paper highlighting the ways the database has expanded, ASL-LEX 2.0—now the largest interactive ASL database in the world—makes learning about the fundamentals of ASL easier and more accessible.”

BBC: Scotland’s little-known fourth “language”

BBC: Scotland’s little-known fourth “language”. ” Colourful yet guttural, the rural north-east dialect is a subset of vernacular Scots, officially protected by the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages…. But it turns out the Doric-speaking community currently have plenty to shout about. For the dialect, maligned for so long, is undergoing a revival. The green shoots to empower Doric speakers are plentiful. There is a new online TV station. A new undergraduate university degree course. A North-East Scots language board. And an interactive cultural map to help visitors discover Doric’s living oral, cultural and social history.” Whenever I learn about a language I want to hear it. Check out this YouTube video about Doric TV. Do not turn on the CC though or you’ll think she’s talking about DirectTV.

The Hindu: A portal for film archives

The Hindu: A portal for film archives. “To this day, there is a gap in documenting and archiving the history of Kannada cinema in an accessible way, which a new online portal… aims to fill. The portal, designed with fonts from yesteryear film posters, is drenched in nostalgia for old films, songs, their history, trivia, and rare-to-find photographs. Kannada is a language spoken in India. You can learn more about it here.