Pro Bono Australia: The project filling in the coronavirus language gap

Pro Bono Australia: The project filling in the coronavirus language gap. “There’s a lot of information out on how to keep safe from coronavirus, but if English isn’t your first language, it can be difficult to track down essential information. It’s an issue that Selena Choo is trying to fix. She has created Videos in Language: Coronavirus and Handwashing, a digital library of important coronavirus health information, videos, and tips, in 28 different Middle-Eastern, African and Asian languages.”

QNS: Free and discounted online language-learning resources for kids amid coronavirus crisis

QNS: Free and discounted online language-learning resources for kids amid coronavirus crisis. “With schools closed and students learning from home, a wide range of online language-learning resources are offering free or discounted courses to children of all ages. Resources like these, ranging from online tutors to video lessons to interactive games, can start your child on the path to advancing their skills in a foreign language or learning a new one from scratch!”

Phys .org: Not a ‘math person’? You may be better at learning to code than you think

Phys .org: Not a ‘math person’? You may be better at learning to code than you think . “New research from the University of Washington finds that a natural aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math knowledge, or numeracy. That’s because writing code also involves learning a second language, an ability to learn that language’s vocabulary and grammar, and how they work together to communicate ideas and intentions. Other cognitive functions tied to both areas, such as problem solving and the use of working memory, also play key roles.”

Times of India: Google Translate gets support for five new languages

Times of India: Google Translate gets support for five new languages. “Google translate help users by giving them perfect translations in different languages. The company has rolled out the latest update for the app which will make it useful for more people. Google has announced that it is adding five new languages to the Google translate app. This is the first expansion made by the company in the past few years.”

KHON: Creative couple comes together to create Hawaiian-language themed cartoon

KHON: Creative couple comes together to create Hawaiian-language themed cartoon. “A creative couple used their family as inspiration for a passion project that teaches kids about island culture. Mom is a singer, dad a graphic designer. They merged their creativity to create a labor of love: Makaʻiwa Keiki.” It’s a YouTube channel to teach kids Hawaiian language. I can easily imagine absentmindedly singing the counting to ten song, but I’ll have to play the ʻHead-Shoulders-Knees-and-Toesʻ Song at quarter-speed to learn to say “toes.”

Machine Non-Learning: The Chinese Words That Trip Up Google Translate (The Bejinger)

The Bejinger: Machine Non-Learning: The Chinese Words That Trip Up Google Translate. “Humankind now speaks more than 5,000 languages, which as anyone who has traveled or lived in a foreign country can attest to, makes life more interesting, if not at times several times more complicated. It is fairly common then for us to turn to translation tools for help, and Google Translate is probably one of the most trusted popular among them (despite the hurdles of the GFW). Yet when translating a language like Chinese – one that is radically different from the Latin language family – digital translators may not be savvy enough to provide a nuanced, reliable definition after all.”

Motherboard: The World’s Second Largest Wikipedia Is Written Almost Entirely by One Bot

Motherboard: The World’s Second Largest Wikipedia Is Written Almost Entirely by One Bot. “The Cebuano Wikipedia is the second largest edition of Wikipedia, lagging behind the English version by only just over 630 thousand articles and ahead of the Swedish and German editions by over 1.64 and 2.98 million articles, respectively. Its positioning is rather peculiar given that, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica, there are only approximately 16.5 million speakers of the language in the Philippines. Despite having over 5.37 million articles, it has only 6 administrators and 14 active users. The English edition, by comparison, has 1,143 administrators and 137,368 active users for over 6 million articles, at the time of writing.”