Coronavirus: The realities of schooling in rural Brazil (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: The realities of schooling in rural Brazil. “In Latin America and the Caribbean, 97% of children are still not having face-to-face classes, according to estimates by the United Nation’s children’s agency, Unicef. That is around 137 million students. On average, children in Latin America have lost nearly four times more days of schooling than in other parts of the world, Unicef says.”

Library of Congress: Hispanic Audio Archive Rebrands as the PALABRA Archive and Releases New Recordings

Library of Congress: Hispanic Audio Archive Rebrands as the PALABRA Archive and Releases New Recordings. “With the Library’s Hispanic Heritage Month festivities underway, it is time to celebrate one of our institution’s most treasured Luso-Hispanic collections. This year, as is tradition during the heritage celebrations, the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress announces the release of fifty new audio recordings from the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape (AHLOT) for online streaming. The release makes available new material from this literary audio archive of Iberian, Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX poets and writers reading from their works.”

Getty Iris: Archive of Venezuelan Intellectual and Photographer Alfredo Boulton Comes to the Getty Research Institute

Getty Iris: Archive of Venezuelan Intellectual and Photographer Alfredo Boulton Comes to the Getty Research Institute. “Photographer Alfredo Boulton, who lived from 1908 to 1995, was a champion of modern art in Latin America and a key intellectual in 20th-century Venezuela. An art critic, art historian, and photographer, he wrote more than 60 publications on the art and historiography of his country…. Newly acquired by the Getty Research Institute, the Boulton archive, ca. 1920-1995, contains his extensive correspondence with local and international artists, institutions, intellectuals, and collectors; his writings for magazines and newspapers, his research materials on pre-Hispanic art, colonial art, the iconography of independence leaders, and modern artists; and a complete vintage collection of his photographic production.”

CNN: Bolivia’s interim president becomes third Latin American head of state to test positive for Covid-19

CNN: Bolivia’s interim president becomes third Latin American head of state to test positive for Covid-19. “Bolivia’s interim president Jeanine Añez has become the third Latin American leader to test positive for the coronavirus, as several members of her cabinet also confirmed infections. Añez announced on Twitter she had contracted the virus and that she would be quarantining for 14 days. Her announcement comes after Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro and Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández also announced they had been infected with Covid-19.”

Buenos Aires Times: Coronavirus decimating indigenous Latin American communities

Buenos Aires Times: Coronavirus decimating indigenous Latin American communities. “The Pan American Health Organisation says that at least 20,000 people living in the Amazon River basin, which passes through Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Bolivia, Ecuador, Venezuela, Guyana and Suriname, are infected. On the border between Brazil and Venezuela, the Yanomamis territory is occupied by around 20,000 illegal miners, according to Survival International. Sometimes, the illegal miners and loggers carry the virus with them, exposing indigenous populations to danger.”

Bloomberg: It’s Covid Code Red in Latin America With No Signs of Peaking

Bloomberg: It’s Covid Code Red in Latin America With No Signs of Peaking. “When a top World Health Organization official this week declared Latin America the new epicenter for Covid-19, few experts in the region needed to be persuaded. The data are overwhelming — and overwhelmingly dreadful. The number of regional cases stands at 1.17 million. Demographic giants Brazil and Mexico are posting among the fastest growth rates and logging daily death records. Viral illness is also rising in Peru, Colombia, Chile and Bolivia.”

Language Magazine: Nahuatl Folktales Translated into English

Language Magazine: Nahuatl Folktales Translated into English. “The Latino Book Review has released a free online archive of English translations of Nahuatl folktales. The stories were translated to English from the native Nahuatl folktales collected by Pablo González Casanova in Cuentos Indígenas, which was published by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Cuentos Indígenas, which was originally published in 1946, features Nahuatl folktales translated into Spanish.”

University of Texas at Austin: Libraries Launch Access Tool for Digital Collections

University of Texas at Austin: Libraries Launch Access Tool for Digital Collections. “At launch, the portal highlights two of the Libraries’ most notable collections: the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection and the Alexander Architectural Archives. The portal contains various materials like scanned photographs, manuscripts, books, broadsides, architectural drawings and maps. Further content is constantly being added, including digitized maps from the Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection and material for scholarly research from the Libraries’ Global Studies Collections. All content in the portal is being indexed by search engines, significantly improving searchability and discoverability.”

Online Journalism Blog: How Periodista de Datos aggregated over 300 journalists in Spain and Latin America to help data journalism collaboration

Online Journalism Blog: How Periodista de Datos aggregated over 300 journalists in Spain and Latin America to help data journalism collaboration. “In July an aggregator of data journalists from Spain and Latin America was launched under the name Periodista de Datos. Four months later, Maria Crosas Batista interviewed Félix Arias, project lead with Miguel Carvajal, to find out more about how the project came about — and where they plan to take it next.”

Facebook scores football: Social media giant to offer free online streaming of next year’s Copa Libertadores (The Bogota Post)

The Bogota Post: Facebook scores football: Social media giant to offer free online streaming of next year’s Copa Libertadores. “Facebook has inked a new four-year deal to stream Latin America’s coveted Copa Libertadores. The deal, which gives them the rights to live broadcasts of the football matches between Latin America’s best clubs, will begin next year and extend towards the season of 2022.”

Universidad de Antioquia: Using Google’s Custom Search Engine Product to Discover Scholarly Open Access and Cost-Free eBooks from Latin America*

Universidad de Antioquia: Using Google’s Custom Search Engine Product to Discover Scholarly Open Access and Cost-Free eBooks from Latin America*. “Many Latin American scholarly monographs are available for free to read and download in a scattered fashion across the web, hosted on educational, institutional and government websites as well as commercial websites and publishing platforms. There is as of yet no single way to identify all of this content at once, but web-based discovery leveraging existing search engine indexing would seem to be a likely option. This case study suggests and evaluates one such method for discovery of open access and other cost-free scholarly monographs produced in Latin America. One possible configuration of Google’s Custom Search Engine product is proposed and evaluated, and findings suggest its usefulness for a variety of applications, including for collection development, the preparation of thematic research guides with open content, and the enrichment of existing lists of open access eBook sources from Latin America.” This is an embedded, downloadable PDF.

Wired: The high-stakes race to stop the trafficking of priceless artefacts

Wired: The high-stakes race to stop the trafficking of priceless artefacts. “In December 2016, David Hidalgo received a photograph of a 17th-century Peruvian painting. The unsigned artwork, of the Virgen de Guadalupe, depicts the Virgin Mary surrounded by apparitions and tells the story of her appearance to Saint Juan Diego near Mexico City in 1531. Hidalgo’s tip-off came via email from a source who had seen the painting on show at the Bowers Museum in California, where it was on loan. Hidalgo’s source suspected that the painting had been stolen.”

Remezcla: One of the World’s Largest Private Collections of Latin American Music Just Hit the Web

Remezcla: One of the World’s Largest Private Collections of Latin American Music Just Hit the Web. “Over the last 30 years, Alejandra Fierro Eleta — also known as Gladys Palmera — has amassed the world’s largest private collection of rare Latin American recordings. The archive includes more than 50,000 albums, photographs, and other ephemera, focusing largely on Afro-Cuban music from the 1950s….But today, the collection cracks open wider than ever before: Colección Gladys Palmera comes to international audiences through a new website and online database that features artwork, curated playlists, podcasts, and a series of articles written by music specialists, letting fans go deep into Palmera’s stunning treasure trove.”

University of North Carolina: Libraries Partner on Open-Access Publication Series

University of North Carolina: Libraries Partner on Open-Access Publication Series. “The University of North Carolina Press, the Institute for the Study of the Americas and the University Libraries published the first title in their collaborative open-access series, Studies in Latin America. Tropical Tongues: Language Ideologies, Endangerment, and Minority Languages in Belize by Jennifer Carolina Gómez Menjívar and William Noel Salmon is expected to be followed up by another monograph published this year. The new series will increase the availability of scholarly literature focused on the social sciences in Latin America and the Caribbean. As an open-access series, the books will be made available digitally to a wide audience, particularly for use in classroom settings.”

Reuters: Google brings free WiFi to Mexico, first stop in Latin America

Reuters: Google brings free WiFi to Mexico, first stop in Latin America. “Alphabet’s Google said on Tuesday that it will launch a network of free Wi-Fi hotspots across Mexico, part of the search giant’s effort to improve connectivity in emerging markets and put its products in the hands of more users.”