AL DÍA News: The Mexican-American visionary bringing representation through Google Doodles

AL DÍA News: The Mexican-American visionary bringing representation through Google Doodles. “Throughout her life, Perla Campos has often navigated through chapters and situations as ‘one of the only.’ Born and raised in a small town about 30 minutes southwest of Dallas-Fort Worth, her family was one of only a few Hispanic families in a predominantly white town. In college, she was again one of the only Hispanics at her school. Even today, she works at one of the largest corporations in the United States and the world — Google — and is one of the few Latinas on the team.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches Season 2 of La Biblioteca Podcast

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches Season 2 of La Biblioteca Podcast . “The English-language series derives from A Latinx Resource Guide: Civil Rights Cases and Events in the United States, created by Hermán Luis Chávez and María Guadalupe (Lupita) Partida, two Huntington Fellows in the Library’s Hispanic Reading Room. The guide offers an overview of 20th and 21st century American court cases, legislation and events that have affected the Hispanic community across the U.S. and in Puerto Rico.”

Arizona State University: ASU works with Google, US-Mexico Foundation to highlight Latino history

Arizona State University: ASU works with Google, US-Mexico Foundation to highlight Latino history . “‘Hey Google, what happened today in Latino history?’ Thanks to a collaboration between Arizona State University, the U.S.-Mexico Foundation (USMF) and Google, this is a question you can now ask any Google Assistant-enabled smart speaker, display or phone. For each day of the year, ASU and the USMF worked together to curate a fact celebrating the achievements, culture and impact of the Latino community in the U.S. and the world.”

Google Blog: New designs for Chrome and Chrome OS, by Latino artists

Google Blog: New designs for Chrome and Chrome OS, by Latino artists. “This year Chrome partnered with Latino artists to create a collection of themes that celebrate our heritage. You can use them to customize your Chrome browser and Chromebook wallpapers. The work reflects a variety of meaningful subjects, from family to the subtle ways we all stay connected. This collection continues our work commissioning contemporary artists to visually show how people use Chrome and Chromebooks to get things done, explore, find and connect.”

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers. “Connecticut is the first state in the nation to mandate that all of its high schools offer an elective class on Black and Latinx history. These classes must be taught by the fall of 2022, but many high schools have added them to the curriculum this year. Alan Marcus, a professor of curriculum and instruction in UConn’s Neag School of Education, has led a team that developed a website to assist high school teachers with the instruction of this course.” I took a quick look and didn’t see anything that was state-specific.

Remezcla: Karen Vidángos of ‘Latina in Museums’ Talks Inclusivity + Hopes for More Diverse Future in the Art World

Remezcla: Karen Vidángos of ‘Latina in Museums’ Talks Inclusivity + Hopes for More Diverse Future in the Art World. “Among the staff at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, is a social media specialist named Karen Vidángos, also known by her social media moniker ‘Latina In Museums.’ The Bolivian-American art history and museum studies graduate merges her social media savvy background with passion for art to explore underrepresented perspectives and amplify the immersion of the Latine community in museum institutions through her platform Latinx Curated.”

The Daily Orange: SU receives grants to digitize Oakwood Cemetery, Latinx community records

The Daily Orange: SU receives grants to digitize Oakwood Cemetery, Latinx community records. “A pair of state grants will enable Syracuse University professors and staff to digitize valuable records pertaining to Oakwood Cemetery and Syracuse’s Latino community. The grants, awarded by the Central New York Libraries Resource Council, will support two projects: converting decades-old death and burial records for Oakwood Cemetery into a searchable database and expanding digital access to cultural artifacts in the La Casita Cultural Center’s archives.”

Press Release: Pace University & UCLA Partner To Explore Digital Mapping In Latinx Studies (Pace University)

Pace University: Press Release: Pace University & UCLA Partner To Explore Digital Mapping In Latinx Studies. “The neighborhood surrounding Pace University’s Lower Manhattan campus was once home to a thriving Spanish-language publishing community that—like many such publishing centers located throughout the United States in the nineteenth century—has largely been forgotten. Associate Professor of English Kelley Kreitz, PhD, also an affiliate faculty member in Latinx Studies, has been working to recover that history with her students.”

Hyperallergic: Five Latinx Art Spaces Band Together to Amplify Their Reach

Hyperallergic: Five Latinx Art Spaces Band Together to Amplify Their Reach. “Angelenos now have a one-stop website consolidating exhibitions and events for Latinx art and culture. It’s a brilliant and sensible idea for a city where roughly half of the population is Latinx. The website… is one of the first initiatives created by the newly formed Latinx Arts Alliance (known as LAA), which is comprised of five notable art spaces in the greater Los Angeles area: the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) in Long Beach, LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes in Downtown, Self Help Graphics & Art in Boyle Heights, the Vincent Price Art Museum in Monterey Park, and the Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC) in Venice Beach.”

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources. “The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and its research institute, the International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA), have launched an expanded, redesigned website and database for its Documents of Latin American and Latino Art Digital Archive Project. Begun 20 years ago, the project now offers full, free access to more than 8,200 letters, manifestos, newspaper and journal articles, exhibition reviews and other key theoretical, critical and art-historical texts. The materials include significant writings by artists, critics and curators from Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean and the U.S. Latino communities — many now available for the first time, via a more user friendly platform.”

University of Nevada, Las Vegas: Bringing Stories of Southern Nevada’s Latinx Communities to Life

University of Nevada, Las Vegas: Bringing Stories of Southern Nevada’s Latinx Communities to Life. “The Latinx Voices of Southern Nevada team has collected more than 100 oral histories from the region’s Latinx population. Now those deeply personal stories will be shared with a wider audience as part of a novel approach to oral histories: a student-led podcast. The effort, which debuts in fall, is the result of a recent collaboration between KUNV radio and the University Libraries’ Oral History Research Center. The inaugural season, Latinx Voices Unveiled, features the Latinx Voices of Southern Nevada project.”

Google Blog: Follow the journey of 13 Latino Trailblazers

Google Blog: Follow the journey of 13 Latino Trailblazers. “The societal contributions of Latinos reach far beyond East Harlem. To celebrate this diversity during Hispanic Heritage Month, members and allies of HOLA, the Hispanic Googler Network, partnered with Google Earth to show the impact Latinos have made around the world. Get a glimpse of how Roberto Clemente, Celia Cruz and 11 other Trailblazing Latinos have broken barriers and paved the way in industries from fashion to medicine.”

New York Times: Preserving Latinx History Through Vintage Photos

New York Times: Preserving Latinx History Through Vintage Photos. “Over the past few years, my Tío Julio has developed a habit of sending me old family photos on WhatsApp. He writes long, novella-like captions with each image, sharing old family lore. Recently, he sent me a fading photo of my bisabuelo’s old house in Santiago, Dominican Republic, and recounted the time a torrential rain flooded the home and almost washed my uncle (then a newborn) into the street in a basket.”

Remezcla: This New Instagram Account Is a Tribute to Old School Latinx New York

Remezcla: This New Instagram Account Is a Tribute to Old School Latinx New York. “One photograph shows two Dominican women at a Brooklyn grocery store – where several Power Rangers balloons float over their heads – buying a cake for a relative’s graduation. Another highlights a Salvadoran couple – the woman tending to their baby, while the man holds a plate of food and a can – on graffiti-accented train. Or there’s the one where a well-accessorized Cuban woman – whose hair is styled to perfection in a high bun topped with pearls – holds a possibly sleepy baby on a couch. Apart, these images capture different aspects and milestones of these people’s lives. Together, though, they form a portrait of Latino New York. All of these snapshots are featured on Nuevayorkinos, a new Instagram account that aims document the diverse experiences of Latinxs who grew up in New York […]

Hispanic Heritage Month: New and Improved Resources to Celebrate! (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Hispanic Heritage Month: New and Improved Resources to Celebrate!. “The Library of Congress is observing National Hispanic Heritage Month this year with an array of on-site concerts, exhibits, lectures and more. But we also have exciting digital offerings for those of you who can’t visit us in person. We’ve just added 50 new recordings to our Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape, and we’ve improved the interface for another popular online resource: the Handbook of Latin American Studies.”