ABC News (Australia): Inside the police database that holds 40 million private records and any officer can access

ABC News (Australia): Inside the police database that holds 40 million private records and any officer can access. “An ABC investigation has exposed privacy breaches of the central police records database that holds files on millions of Australians. The Computerised Operational Policing System (COPS) database holds more than 40 million records that can be accessed by NSW’s 16,000 police officers.”

The Next Web: Europol is developing a ‘game’ to teach officers how to trace cryptocurrency

The Next Web: Europol is developing a ‘game’ to teach officers how to trace cryptocurrency. “Cryptocurrency crime fighters are about to have a lot more fun after Europol has revealed its developing a game to help law enforcers learn how to trace and investigate illicit uses of digital currencies.”

The New York Times: Dark Web Drug Sellers Dodge Police Crackdowns

The New York Times: Dark Web Drug Sellers Dodge Police Crackdowns. “Authorities in the United States and Europe recently staged a wide-ranging crackdown on online drug markets, taking down Wall Street Market and Valhalla, two of the largest drug markets on the so-called dark web. Yet the desire to score drugs from the comfort of home and to make money from selling those drugs appears for many to be stronger than the fear of getting arrested.”

New Zealand Herald: Police pay $10,000 for social media audit – to be told to do fewer puppy posts

New Zealand Herald: Police pay $10,000 for social media audit – to be told to do fewer puppy posts. “Police paid $10,000 for a social media audit by a marketing company which suggested dialling back on puppy pictures and posting more about operational police work. The audit included a manual assessment of thousands of comments on police social media channels.”

Courthouse News Service: San Francisco DA Turns to AI to Tame Racial Bias

Courthouse News Service: San Francisco DA Turns to AI to Tame Racial Bias. “A new tool developed at no cost to the city by the Stanford Computational Policy Lab scans the police incident reports prosecutors use to decide whether to charge someone with a crime. The program uses an algorithm to remove any information that could be used to determine the suspect’s race – hair and eye color, specific neighborhoods and the names of suspects, victims and the arresting officer – replacing those identifiers with generic terms.”

The Verge: Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous

The Verge: Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous. “From train stations and concert halls to sport stadiums and airports, facial recognition is slowly becoming the norm in public spaces. But new hardware formats like these facial recognition-enabled smart glasses could make the technology truly ubiquitous, able to be deployed by law enforcement and private security any time and any place.”