News12: New Jersey launches searchable site of police use-of-force reports

News12: New Jersey launches searchable site of police use-of-force reports. “The New Jersey Office of the Attorney General has launched an online database that allows the public to search reports of police use of force from across the state’s more than 500 police departments. Attorney General Gurbir Grewal said Tuesday in a statement that the new site, which his office says is a beta, or test, version, is part of an ongoing effort to increase police accountability and openness.”

iNews UK: ‘Global Dark Web drug network’ disrupted after raids target organised criminal gang across England

iNews UK: ‘Global Dark Web drug network’ disrupted after raids target organised criminal gang across England. “The arrest and search operation, which also targeted addresses in Surrey, was the latest arising from the success of law enforcement agencies around the world in breaking into EncroChat, the encrypted phone network which had become a favoured way for organised crime gangs to communicate and establish international connections.”

BuzzFeed News: Surveillance Nation

BuzzFeed News: Surveillance Nation. “A controversial facial recognition tool designed for policing has been quietly deployed across the country with little to no public oversight. According to reporting and data reviewed by BuzzFeed News, more than 7,000 individuals from nearly 2,000 public agencies nationwide have used Clearview AI to search through millions of Americans’ faces, looking for people, including Black Lives Matter protesters, Capitol insurrectionists, petty criminals, and their own friends and family members. BuzzFeed News has developed a searchable table of 1,803 publicly funded agencies whose employees are listed in the data as having used or tested the controversial policing tool before February 2020.”

Las Cruces Sun News: New Mexico State Police’s first TikTok video goes viral

Las Cruces Sun News: New Mexico State Police’s first TikTok video goes viral. “About a month ago, the New Mexico State Police started a TikTok account. Last week, the agency debuted its first video, which is of a female officer getting ready for work. The video of Byanca Castro, a patrol officer based out Las Vegas, N.M., has been viewed more than 400,000 times.”

Washington Post: Manhattan district attorney to release years of racial data as part of nationwide accountability push

Washington Post: Manhattan district attorney to release years of racial data as part of nationwide accountability push. “The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office on Thursday will grant the public access to more than seven years worth of racial data that the top prosecutor here says has informed his approach to criminal justice reform. The database will include race and gender information related to charging decisions, plea-deal offers, bail amounts and sentencing.”

Social media drove real police reform in America: Study (KCBS)

KCBS: Social media drove real police reform in America: Study. “Last year’s widespread social media conversations concerning racial and social justice in America spilled over into actual police reform, a new study says. The report, titled ‘Say Their Names,’ was released by communications and research firm Marathon Strategies and The BLK+Cross. It found a direct correlation between state-level legislature action on social justice issues and the amplified online dialogue about police reform, using analysis and trends from all 50 states and Washington, D.C.”

ABC News: More than 800 Massachusetts State Police employees decline COVID-19 vaccine

ABC News: More than 800 Massachusetts State Police employees decline COVID-19 vaccine. “More than 800 Massachusetts State Police employees declined to receive the COVID-19 vaccine despite being in the first stage of priority for the doses, police sources said. A total of 845 members of the MSP, including sworn personnel and civilian officers, declined to receive the vaccine at state police clinics. That’s about 30% of the force’s sworn and civilian officers.”

Gothamist: NYPD Rejects City Council Request To Release More Internal Misconduct Records

Gothamist: NYPD Rejects City Council Request To Release More Internal Misconduct Records. “Over the last several months, the NYPD has insisted that it is working to increase transparency and accountability ahead of an April 1st state deadline for police reforms. But at a City Council hearing on Tuesday, the NYPD’s leadership declined to publish more comprehensive data on police misconduct investigations.”

New York Times: N.Y.P.D. Releases Secret Misconduct Records After Repeal of Shield Law

New York Times: N.Y.P.D. Releases Secret Misconduct Records After Repeal of Shield Law. “Nearly nine months after New York lawmakers, inspired by mass protests over police brutality, repealed a law that kept the discipline records of officers secret for decades, the New York Police Department on Monday began publishing some of the sealed information. The department released partial disciplinary records for all 35,000 active police officers dating back to 2014 in an online database, searchable by name. Separately, officials posted redacted copies of more than 200 decisions by judges in administrative trials, going back to 2017.” It’s my understanding that this is a separate release (though it may contain overlapping information) from the CCRB release last week.

International Business Times: Intern’s Selfie With Keys Forces German Prison To Change Over 600 Locks, Costs Him His Job

International Business Times: Intern’s Selfie With Keys Forces German Prison To Change Over 600 Locks, Costs Him His Job. “The trainee who remains unnamed, inadvertently shared the picture with his friends to brag about his new job, local media reported. The thoughtless action, however, caused a serious security threat to the prison that houses 657 inmates. The mindlessness of the intern could have resulted in a mass break-out at the prison as anyone could have easily made replicas of the keys with the leaked image.”

Boing Boing: Database of police settlements

Boing Boing: Database of police settlements. “Five Thirty Eight published a database of police settlements at Github—a unique body of information that reveals the financial costs incurred by America’s excessively violent cops. But it cautions against using the information to draw comparisons between jurisdictions.”

New York Magazine: The City Just Released a Massive NYPD-Misconduct Database

New York Magazine: The City Just Released a Massive NYPD-Misconduct Database. “While much of the information contained in the Civilian Complaint Review Board’s database was made last summer by the New York Civil Liberties Union, the CCRB’s release of records marks the first time a city or state agency has made such a database available in compliance with last summer’s repeal of 50-a, the state law that had long shielded police-misconduct records from public scrutiny.”

Washington Post: Home-security cameras have become a fruitful resource for law enforcement — and a fatal risk

Washington Post: Home-security cameras have become a fruitful resource for law enforcement — and a fatal risk. “Police forces across the U.S. made more than 20,000 requests last year for footage captured by Ring’s ‘video doorbells’ and other home-security cameras, underscoring how the rapid growth of inexpensive home surveillance technology has given American law enforcement an unprecedented ability to monitor neighborhood life.”