GCN: The power and danger of social media for law enforcement

GCN: The power and danger of social media for law enforcement. “Social media can help spread information rapidly to community members, which can be useful during public safety emergencies and natural disasters. It can also reduce the time it takes for first responders to get the important information they need, such as location coordinates to help a person in danger. If crucial information needs to be communicated quickly, a text message is often the channel of choice. According to the Pew Research Center, 98% of text messages are read within two minutes — a time savings that can literally mean the difference between life and death in an emergency.”

ProPublica: We’re Publishing Thousands of Police Discipline Records That New York Kept Secret for Decades

ProPublica: We’re Publishing Thousands of Police Discipline Records That New York Kept Secret for Decades. “In releasing the information included in our database, ProPublica is not publishing all complaints against officers. As we’ve noted, we’ve limited the data to only those officers who’ve had at least one substantiated allegation. And every complaint in the database was fully investigated by the CCRB, which means, among other steps, a civilian provided a sworn statement to investigators. We’ve also excluded any allegations that investigators concluded were unfounded, meaning investigators determined the incident did not happen as the complainant alleged. There were about 3,200 allegations listed as unfounded in the data we were provided, about 9% of the total.”

Uganda – where security forces may be more deadly than coronavirus (BBC)

BBC: Uganda – where security forces may be more deadly than coronavirus. “In Uganda, at least 12 people have allegedly been killed by security officers enforcing measures to restrict the spread of coronavirus, while no-one has been confirmed as dying from the virus itself. Patience Atuhaire has been meeting some of those affected by the violence.”

Chicago Reporter: Chicago Police Department partially restores access to arrests data following outcry

Chicago Reporter: Chicago Police Department partially restores access to arrests data following outcry. “The Chicago Police Department has partially restored access to critical arrests data that was removed after the Reporter used it to refute official claims about arrests made in the early days of unrest due to the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd. The data was made available two days after the Reporter published a story about how access to the API, a tool used by journalists and researchers to do timely analyses, had been shut down.”

Alaska Department of Public Safety: Trooper Recruitment Advertisement Censored by Google/YouTube

Alaska Department of Public Safety: Trooper Recruitment Advertisement Censored by Google/YouTube. “This week, the Department of Public Safety (DPS) was notified that Google/YouTube canceled authorization of pay-per-click advertisement of a recently, nationally distributed recruitment video advertisement for the Alaska State Troopers. The action was taken as it was interpreted to be political and potentially an election advertisement because of Governor Mike Dunleavy’s comments supporting law enforcement and encouraging people to apply to the DPS ranks.”

ProPublica: A Teenager Didn’t Do Her Online Schoolwork. So a Judge Sent Her to Juvenile Detention.

ProPublica: A Teenager Didn’t Do Her Online Schoolwork. So a Judge Sent Her to Juvenile Detention.. “A 15-year-old in Michigan was incarcerated during the coronavirus pandemic after a judge ruled that not completing her schoolwork violated her probation. ‘It just doesn’t make any sense,’ said the girl’s mother.”

Mashable: Police are worried about white extremists organizing on Gab Chat, leaked documents show

Mashable: Police are worried about white extremists organizing on Gab Chat, leaked documents show. “Violent white extremists are sick of getting doxxed on Discord, and will ‘likely’ move their organizing efforts to an encrypted messaging alternative created by Gab, an alt-right favorite. So claims a May 26 law enforcement bulletin leaked, along with 269GB of files from over 200 police departments, in late June by hackers and published by Distributed Denial of Secrets, a journalist organization specializing in the publication of leaked documents.”

Electronic Frontier Foundation: EFF Launches Searchable Database of Police Agencies and the Tech Tools They Use to Spy on Communities

Electronic Frontier Foundation: EFF Launches Searchable Database of Police Agencies and the Tech Tools They Use to Spy on Communities. “The Atlas of Surveillance database, containing several thousand data points on over 3,000 city and local police departments and sheriffs’ offices nationwide, allows citizens, journalists, and academics to review details about the technologies police are deploying, and provides a resource to check what devices and systems have been purchased locally.”

Motherboard: The Secret Service Tried to Catch a Hacker With a Malware Booby-Trap

Motherboard: The Secret Service Tried to Catch a Hacker With a Malware Booby-Trap. “A Seattle Police Department officer tried to unmask a ransomware attacker by deploying his own hack, according to newly unsealed court records. Although in this case the officer’s attempt didn’t work, the news shows that the use of so-called network investigative techniques (NITs)—the U.S. government’s general term for hacking tools deployed by law enforcement—is not limited to the FBI. Here, the Seattle Police Department official was working in their capacity as a Task Force Officer for the U.S. Secret Service.”

SBS News: Deaths in custody database reinvigorates calls for justice system overhaul

SBS News: Deaths in custody database reinvigorates calls for justice system overhaul. “Researchers behind a national database of Australian deaths in custody over the past three decades say they hope it shines a light on the lives lost and the need for reform. Nearly 800 coroners’ reports can now be searched in the one place, including the 437 Aboriginal deaths in custody since 1991.”

KOBI: Oregon releases new, online database showing police misconduct

KOBI: Oregon releases new, online database showing police misconduct. “A new database is now available showing Oregon law enforcement officers’ suspensions, open investigations, and who has lost their badge. It comes in the wake of George Floyd’s death and the passage of House Bill 4207 in the legislature in recent weeks.”

Brookings Institution: How to reform police monitoring of social media

Brookings Institution: How to reform police monitoring of social media. “From protests to public housing, social media monitoring raises civil liberties and civil rights concerns that are currently going unaddressed. Establishing a framework that balances public safety and the right to privacy, free expression, and equal protection under the law requires updates to our existing regulatory controls.”

Greenock Telegraph: Pub boss was stripped of his licence after keeping his bar open despite the coronavirus lockdown

Greenock Telegraph: Pub boss was stripped of his licence after keeping his bar open despite the coronavirus lockdown. “CORONAVIRUS shutdown-flouting pub boss Ian Ellis was stripped of his licence after putting lives at risk by keeping his bar open as the pandemic gripped Greenock. Ellis continued trading at his Cheers premises — a decision which led to drunken violence and shameful headlines — despite being told to close to protect the community.”

TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app

TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app. “Hundreds of alleged drug dealers and other criminals are in custody today after police in Europe infiltrated an encrypted chat system reportedly used by thousands to discuss illegal operations. The total failure of this ostensibly secure method of communication will likely have a chilling effect on the shadowy industry of crime-focused tech.”