ProPublica: Chicago’s Gang Database Is Full of Errors — And Records We Have Prove It

ProPublica: Chicago’s Gang Database Is Full of Errors — And Records We Have Prove It. “During January 1984, the Chicago Police Department labeled more than 700 people as suspected gang members following arrests for various crimes. One was in his early 30s and identified as a member of the Black P Stones. By last fall, nearly 34 years later, that individual was 77 — and still in what police commonly refer to as the department’s ‘gang database.'”

Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions

Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions. “What if you could pay a fine for a traffic offense with a post online? In southwestern China, traffic violators get off the hook over a minor offense if they admit to their blunder on social media—and earn at least 20 likes, reports Beijing News.”

Gizmodo: Cops in Wales Caught a Drug Dealer by IDing His Fingerprint from a WhatsApp Photo

Gizmodo: Cops in Wales Caught a Drug Dealer by IDing His Fingerprint from a WhatsApp Photo. “Police in Wales managed to arrest and convict a drug dealer by identifying his fingerprint from a photo posted on WhatsApp, a technique that the local law enforcement is calling ‘groundbreaking,’ according to the BBC.”

BuzzFeed: Here’s What We Learned From Thousands Of Secret NYPD Disciplinary Files

BuzzFeed: Here’s What We Learned From Thousands Of Secret NYPD Disciplinary Files. “BuzzFeed News is making public a huge cache of the New York Police Department’s disciplinary records, revealing for the first time which employees have been charged with misconduct and what punishment, if any, they have received.”

Whitesplaining on Facebook: PhD Student Donte Newman Looks at Race and Social Media (American University)

American University: Whitesplaining on Facebook: PhD Student Donte Newman Looks at Race and Social Media. “Newman is writing his dissertation on race and social media, specifically examining white people’s Facebook responses to police violence. He’s not just probing racial attitudes, but how people’s interactions with technology shape and reinforce societal power structures. ‘In light of a string of recent shootings, police brutality against black people has emerged as a contentious topic in national dialogue. And many of these conversations are taking place within Facebook,’ says Newman. ‘However, the technological architecture of Facebook may influence how users have conversations about racially motivated police shootings.'”

Wall Street Journal: Facial Recognition Could Move Beyond Mug Shots

Wall Street Journal: Facial Recognition Could Move Beyond Mug Shots. “When police found a senior citizen apparently suffering from Alzheimer’s missing from her family on Staten Island in 2014, officials took to technology. They sent a photograph of the woman to an NYPD unit. A detective ran the image against a database of ‘several million’ mug shots and was surprised to find the woman among the hundreds the software returned as possible matches.” This article was not paywalled when I looked at it.

CBC News: Deadly force

CBC News: Deadly force. “The cell phone video, which is of poor quality and shot at a distance, shows a man crawling forward on his hands and knees towards a couple of police officers. Suddenly, gunshots reverberate through the street, as eight bullets hit Paul Boyd, killing the 39-year-old instantly. Captured by a bystander, this 2007 incident was one of 461 fatal police encounters in Canada since 2000 — and a new CBC analysis shows that the number is on the rise. In the absence of a national accounting of such encounters between Canadian citizens and law enforcement, a team of CBC researchers spent six months assembling the first country-wide database of every person who died or was killed during a police intervention.”