CNET: Ring let police view map of video doorbell installations for over a year

CNET: Ring let police view map of video doorbell installations for over a year. “For more than a year, police departments partnered with Amazon’s Ring unit had access to a map showing where its video doorbells were installed, down to the street, public documents revealed. So while Ring said it didn’t provide police with addresses for the devices, a feature in the map tool let them get extremely close. The feature was removed in July.”

The Register: Europol wipes out 30,000+ piracy sites, three suspects cuffed to walk the legal plank

The Register: Europol wipes out 30,000+ piracy sites, three suspects cuffed to walk the legal plank. “In total, Europol says it was able to shut down 30,506 domains. They also arrested three people, seized 26,000 pieces of clothing and perfume, grabbed 363 litres of alcohol (about 10 Reg holiday parties), an unspecified number of hardware devices, and upwards of €150,000 in bank and online payment accounts.”

Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want. “Since its introduction, Ring has been steadily increasing its market share — both with homeowners and their public servants. At the beginning of August, this partnership included 200 law enforcement agencies. Three months later, that number has increased to 630.”

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police . “Those on Hong Kong social media—especially on Twitter and some channels on Telegram, the secure messaging app preferred by the protesters—have made a concerted effort to document and publicize police brutality. #HongKongPoliceBrutality and #HongKongPoliceTerrorism are just two of the hashtags Hong Kongers use on Twitter as they recirculate videos and graphics contextualizing the violence. These netizen-protesters see themselves as being on the front lines of the information war over Hong Kong, coordinating a PR campaign to raise awareness—and get the international attention that they see as crucial to their movement’s success.” This was a great story, but The Nation had an pop-in ad for its mailing list that was really intrusive. I could only get rid of it by reloading the page.

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon system locates shooters using smartphone video

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon system locates shooters using smartphone video. “Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on video recordings from as few as three smartphones. When demonstrated using three video recordings from the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded, the system correctly estimated the shooter’s actual location — the north wing of the Mandalay Bay hotel.”

Ubergizmo: US Federal Court Rules That Suspicionless Phone Searches At The Border Is Illegal

Ubergizmo: US Federal Court Rules That Suspicionless Phone Searches At The Border Is Illegal. “As some of you might have heard, it seems that people wanting to get a visa to the US will need to hand over social media information. In some cases, some visitors to the US have even had their phones and electronic devices searched at the border, which some believe is a violation of a person’s privacy.”

My Champlain Valley: Public database of racial info from Vermont traffic stops launched

My Champlain Valley: Public database of racial info from Vermont traffic stops launched. “Five years after Vermont law enforcement officers first became required to document the race of all drivers they pull over in traffic stops, that information has proven to be difficult to come by. However, a Vermont racial justice group has just made the data significantly easier to find.”