Lawsuit: Chicago police falsely ID thousands as gang members (Daily Collegian)

Daily Collegian: Lawsuit: Chicago police falsely ID thousands as gang members. ” Civil rights groups filed a lawsuit Tuesday alleging that the Chicago Police Department relies on an error-plagued database that names up to 195,000 people as gang members, including many who have never been in a gang…. Those listed as gang members have a harder time landing jobs, are more likely to be denied bond after arrests and are often targets of harassment by police or immigration officers, it contends.”

Kansas City Star: Russian Facebook posts may have inspired militia in Kansas bombing plot, expert says

Kansas City Star: Russian Facebook posts may have inspired militia in Kansas bombing plot, expert says. “The three southwest Kansas men recently convicted in a militia plot to bomb Somali immigrants may have been motivated by Russian manipulation of U.S. social media, a terrorism expert says. Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, said the domestic terrorism attack was being planned at the same time the Russians were conducting a cybercampaign that included posting material on Facebook designed to heighten racial tension in the United States.”

University of North Texas: A better cold-case database

University of North Texas: A better cold-case database. “NamUs, or the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, is a clearinghouse and resource center for missing person cases, unidentified bodies, unidentified living individuals and unclaimed bodies. Based at UNT Health Science Center since 2011, it is managed by the UNT Center for Human Identification through a cooperative agreement with the National Institute of Justice. NamUs 2.0 replaces the existing NamUs databases, which were launched in 2007 and 2008. Since then, NamUs has received more than 15,000 unidentified person cases and over 32,000 missing person cases. More than 3,000 of those unidentified person cases and more than 14,000 missing person cases have been resolved.”

Quartz: Facebook content is convenient evidence for prosecutors, but not for defendants

Quartz: Facebook content is convenient evidence for prosecutors, but not for defendants. “When prosecutors want to get a Facebook user’s private posts or direct messages as evidence, they have to request it from the company through a warrant or subpoena. In most cases, Facebook will grant the information. But this sort of access is not given to criminal defendants.”

AltGov2: FBI Wants to Destroy 9,000+ RICO Files

AltGov2: FBI Wants to Destroy 9,000+ RICO Files. “The FBI wants to pulp small files about its RICO investigations from 1970-1991. Larger files (those containing more than one section or 30+ registered documents) will be kept permanently. However, files with only one section and less than 30 registered documents will be destroyed 25 years after the case has been closed. Since these cases date from 27 to 48 years ago, the files would be eligible for destruction as soon as FBI’s proposal gets final approval. The National Archives (NARA) estimates that under this proposal, 29% of the RICO files from that period would be kept permanently. Thus, 71% would be destroyed. Out of a total of 12,971 files, that means around 9,210 will go into the shredder. These documents have not been scanned, so they don’t exist in digital form. Once they’re pulped, they’re gone.”

Atlanta police: Cyberattack erased dashcam archive (Miami Herald)

Miami Herald: Atlanta police: Cyberattack erased dashcam archive. “The Atlanta Police Department’s archive of dashboard camera video was wiped out in a March cyberattack, the police chief said. The loss might compromise a drunken driving case, Chief Erika Shields told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV , but she’s not greatly worried.”

The Telegraph: Database aims to counter surge in luxury watch thefts

The Telegraph: Database aims to counter surge in luxury watch thefts . “The increased targeting of luxury watches by ruthless street robbers and smash and grab gangs has led to a dramatic rise in the number of stolen timepieces being registered with a crime prevention database. The surge in thefts – which has seen more than £1m of watches stolen in central London in the first quarter of this year alone – has led to a rush of owners using the Watch Register in a bid to trace their items.”