Chicago Sun-Times: People in Arizona may soon have to give up their DNA for a statewide database

Chicago Sun-Times: People in Arizona may soon have to give up their DNA for a statewide database. “Arizona could soon be one of the first states to maintain a massive statewide DNA database. And if the proposed legislation passes, many people — from parent school volunteers and teachers to real estate agents and foster parents — will have no choice but to give up their DNA.” And apparently pay 250 smackeroos to do it.

The Verge: The golden age of dark web drug markets is over

The Verge: The golden age of dark web drug markets is over. “In July 2017, federal agents took down the Alphabay marketplace, then one of the largest and most profitable sources for drugs on the dark web. At the time, it seemed like a messy end to the string of dark net takedowns that started with the Silk Road. But more than a year and a half after the takedown, federal agents are still making arrests in Alphabay cases, chasing down dealers who sold drugs through the site.”

Techdirt: NYPD Sends Letter To Google Demanding It Remove Cop Checkpoint Notifications From Google Maps

Techdirt: NYPD Sends Letter To Google Demanding It Remove Cop Checkpoint Notifications From Google Maps. “A few years after law enforcement officials claimed Google’s Waze navigation app allowed cop killers to stalk cops, the NYPD is demanding Google alter one of its apps (Google Maps, which incorporates certain Waze features) so it works more like the NYPD wants it to work, rather than how drivers want it to work. Gersh Kuntzman of Streetsblog NYC was the first to obtain a copy of a cease-and-desist sent to Google by the NYPD.”

BuzzFeed News: One Of The Biggest At-Home DNA Testing Companies Is Working With The FBI

BuzzFeed News: One Of The Biggest At-Home DNA Testing Companies Is Working With The FBI. “Family Tree DNA, one of the largest private genetic testing companies whose home-testing kits enable people to trace their ancestry and locate relatives, is working with the FBI and allowing agents to search its vast genealogy database in an effort to solve violent crime cases, BuzzFeed News has learned.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Athens, Georgia crime dockets from 1902 to 1907 now freely available online

Digital Library of Georgia: Athens, Georgia crime dockets from 1902 to 1907 now freely available online. “The digital collection consists of eight bound dockets dating from 1902 to 1907, and includes about 5,760 individual arrest cases in Athens, Georgia. Entries generally include a case number, the defendant’s name, the code violated, the date and location of the arrest, the date papers were served, the arresting officer’s name, a list of witnesses, and the dispensation of the case.”

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state. “There are more than 400 cold cases throughout Utah — unsolved homicides, reports of missing persons or unidentified bodies. Last year, lawmakers passed a bill that requires all law-enforcement agencies to share information on unsolved missing persons and homicide cases that are more than 3 years old. The goal is to help police share information and make connections between cases that are being investigated by different agencies.” Part of the database will be available to the public.

TechCrunch: Police license plate readers are still exposed on the internet

TechCrunch: Police license plate readers are still exposed on the internet. “Considered a massive invasion of privacy by many and legally questionable by some, there are tens of thousands of ALPR readers across the U.S. collectively reading and recording thousand of license plates — and locations — every minute, the ACLU says, becoming one of the new and emerging forms of mass surveillance in the U.S. But some cameras are connected to the internet, and are easily identifiable. Worse, some are leaking sensitive data about vehicles and their drivers — and many have weak security protections that make them easily accessible.”