University of Southern California: Database provides details about officer-involved shootings and deadly incidents

University of Southern California: Database provides details about officer-involved shootings and deadly incidents. “[Professor Brian] Finch is preparing to launch a new repository for police homicide data: the National Officer-Involved Homicide Database (NOIHD). NOIHD is an expansion of the Fatal Encounters website and will provide more data, such as whether the deceased was armed or unarmed, the education and training requirements for the officers in that department and who conducted the autopsies of the deceased. The NOIHD information is collected from police departments, hospital emergency departments, the FBI, census data, state governments and other sources.”

The Verge: Ring will require video requests to be public in Neighbors app starting next week

The Verge: Ring will require video requests to be public in Neighbors app starting next week. “Ring is adjusting how public agencies such as police and fire departments are able to request video clips from Ring camera owners in its Neighbors app. Starting next week, agencies will only be able to request clips be sent to them through public posts that are viewable in the app’s main feed; they will no longer be able to send individuals specific requests for clips.”

California State University Northridge: CSUN Prof Weighs the Power of Social Media to Empower Communities of Color

California State University Northridge: CSUN Prof Weighs the Power of Social Media to Empower Communities of Color. “Video of the murder of George Floyd in May 2020, taken by witnesses, sparked outrage on social media, fueled by the fact that this was not the only online video of an officer taking the life of a Black American. According to California State University, Northridge criminology and justice studies professor Brianne Posey, young activists using video of encounters between police officers and civilians of color are both helping and not helping shift the power dynamic between the two groups.”

The Compendium of U.S. jails: creating and conducting research with the first comprehensive contact database of U.S. jails (Health & Justice Journal)

Health & Justice Journal: The Compendium of U.S. jails: creating and conducting research with the first comprehensive contact database of U.S. jails. “Millions of people pass through U.S. jails annually. Conducting research about these public institutions is critical to understanding on-the-ground policies and practices, especially health care services, affecting millions of people. However, there is no existing database of the number, location, or contact information of jails. We created the National Jails Compendium to address this gap. In this paper, we detail our comprehensive methodology for identifying jail locations and contact information. We then describe the first research project to use the Compendium, a survey assessing jails’ treatment practices for incarcerated pregnant people with opioid use disorder.”

Ransomware: Should paying hacker ransoms be illegal? (BBC)

BBC: Ransomware: Should paying hacker ransoms be illegal?. “Ransomware attacks prevent victims accessing computer systems or data until a ransom is paid. Law-enforcement agencies around the world are increasingly urging victims not to pay. But paying ransoms is not illegal. And many organisations pay in secret. Now, the Ransomware Task Force (RTF) global coalition of cyber-experts is lobbying governments to take action.”

Chicago Sun-Times: Chicago plan for police misconduct database fails to meet the moment

Chicago Sun-Times: Chicago plan for police misconduct database fails to meet the moment. “This week, the Chicago City Council is expected to vote to create a public database of allegations of police misconduct — one-stop-shopping for anybody in town to review all complaints and how they have been handled and resolved. Except it wouldn’t really work that way. The database proposed by Mayor Lori Lightfoot and allies in the City Council would be nothing but transparency-lite. More show than tell.”

CNET: Amazon sales of facial recognition software to police on pause indefinitely

CNET: Amazon sales of facial recognition software to police on pause indefinitely. “Amazon isn’t ready to begin sales of its facial recognition software to law enforcement agencies when a year-long moratorium expires in June. The company didn’t announce a new deadline, and the suspension of sales of the Rekognition software will stay in place until further notice, as reported earlier by Reuters.”

Los Angeles Times: Citizen app posts image of wrong man as arson suspect in Palisades fire

Los Angeles Times: Citizen app posts image of wrong man as arson suspect in Palisades fire. “An image of a young man was sent on the Citizen personal safety app to users in the Los Angeles basin after a brush fire broke out late Friday night and quickly grew…. But there was one problem: The man was not the person identified by an LAPD observer in a helicopter as the one seen igniting multiple fires that eventually swelled to consume more than 1,300 acres between Pacific Palisades and Topanga Canyon.”

Washington Post: You have the right to film police. Here’s how to do it effectively — and safely

Washington Post: You have the right to film police. Here’s how to do it effectively — and safely. “Smartphones now allow citizens to film and even live-stream their own police encounters, yet the act of recording can put people at risk in highly charged situations. Many Black Americans are tired of having to document each time a police officer kills a Black person to prove it happened. And while the surge in smartphone evidence has fueled calls for reform, one reason [Darnella] Frazier’s video stands out is because it was so rare in actually leading to the conviction of an officer. So how can and should you use your phone to bear witness? I spoke with lawyers, police, activists, photojournalists and technologists to get their advice on how to best record the police, both legally and technologically.”

WUSA: Hackers demand $4 million ransom from DC police, as more officers’ confidential info posted to the dark web

WUSA: Hackers demand $4 million ransom from DC police, as more officers’ confidential info posted to the dark web. “In the latest escalation of an unprecedented cyber-attack against U.S. law enforcement, hackers belonging to the Russian-speaking Babuk syndicate posted a $4 million ransom demand against the Metropolitan Police Department on the dark web. The demand came as more D.C. police officers received notice their confidential information was included within the scope of the April hack.”

WUNC: North Carolina, DOJ Double Down On Secrecy Of Deaths In-Custody Data

WUNC: North Carolina, DOJ Double Down On Secrecy Of Deaths In-Custody Data. “As communities across the nation continue to grapple with high-profile police killings, North Carolina officials have again refused to release information on the deaths of people who died in custody, citing guidance from the U.S. Department of Justice. The congressman who wrote the law requiring states to collect that information says both North Carolina and the U.S. DOJ are getting it wrong.”