Washington Post: House to grill Facebook, Google, Twitter CEOs as Washington seeks to crack down on disinformation, antitrust

Washington Post: House to grill Facebook, Google, Twitter CEOs as Washington seeks to crack down on disinformation, antitrust. “House lawmakers are set to grill the top executives at Facebook, Google and Twitter at a high-profile congressional hearing next month, as Democrats and Republicans take fresh aim at the tech giants for failing to crack down on dangerous political falsehoods and disinformation about the coronavirus.”

Politico: City can publish NYPD discipline files, appeals court rules

Politico: City can publish NYPD discipline files, appeals court rules. “New York City can publish police officers’ disciplinary records, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday — shooting down a lawsuit by law enforcement unions that sought to block the release. The state legislature voted in June to repeal a law that kept police disciplinary files secret as part of a police reform push driven by protests after the death of George Floyd.”

CNET: Google settles with Labor Department over alleged hiring and pay discrimination

CNET: Google settles with Labor Department over alleged hiring and pay discrimination. “Google will pay almost $2.6 million to settle claims of ‘systemic compensation and hiring discrimination’ at offices in California and Washington, the US Department of Labor said Monday. The department said it found pay disparities that affected Google female engineering employees, as well as female and Asian job applicants.”

Irish Legal News: New website explores use of restorative justice in Ireland

Irish Legal News: New website explores use of restorative justice in Ireland. “The… website has been launched by the Restorative Justice: Strategies for Change (RJS4C) project and hosts the initial findings of its mapping exercise and its first tranche of case studies. The website also includes opinion pieces, wider resources and news from the project, which is viewed favourably by government ministers.”

JD Supra: New Law Gives Pennsylvania Executors Power Over Decedents’ Social Media And Other Digital Content

JD Supra: New Law Gives Pennsylvania Executors Power Over Decedents’ Social Media And Other Digital Content. “Pennsylvania recently became one of the last states to enact a law treating digital assets and electronic records as tangible property, which allows executors, trustees, guardians, and agents to access and manage the digital assets of decedents. Now beneficiaries have access to and may take possession of their loved ones’ photos, music, videos, email messages, and other digital content that are hosted on social media platforms such as Facebook and Instagram and stored by tech giants like Apple and Google.”

Law Street Media: Ancestry .com Moves to Dismiss Yearbook Photo Misappropriation Suit

Law Street Media: Ancestry .com Moves to Dismiss Yearbook Photo Misappropriation Suit. “On [January 4] in the Northern District of California, Ancestry.com and related entities and individuals filed a motion to dismiss the putative class action lawsuit against it claiming the company misappropriated their personal information and photographs for advertising and other promotional purposes. Ancestry claimed that this lawsuit is ‘misguided’ and should be dismissed with prejudice.”

George Washington University Program on Extremism: Capitol Hill Siege

George Washington University Program on Extremism: Capitol Hill Siege. “In keeping with our tradition of providing primary source documents to the research community and the public at large, The Program on Extremism has launched a project to create a central database of court records related to the events of January 6, 2021. This page will be updated as additional individuals are charged with criminal activities and new records are introduced into the criminal justice system.”

9to5 Google: YouTube rival Rumble sues Google over video search rankings

9to5 Google: YouTube rival Rumble sues Google over video search rankings. “According to the Wall Street Journal, the Canadian-based Rumble has accused Google of ‘unfairly rigging its search algorithm’ and favoring video content hosted on YouTube over rival platforms. Rumble has become a popular video hosting platform for conservatives in the US who claim that the established tech platforms are engaging in censorship.”

ReviewGeek: DoNotPay’s Robot Lawyer Can Create Your Legal Contracts

ReviewGeek: DoNotPay’s Robot Lawyer Can Create Your Legal Contracts. “The new legal document service can create Business Contracts like Non-Disclosure Agreements, Independent Contractor Agreements, Bill of Sale, and General Business Contracts. It can always work up real estate documents like Residential Lease Agreement, Intent to Purchase Real Estate documents, and Estoppel Certificates. It can even whip up a General Affidavit, Promissory Note, or Prenuptial Agreement.” Obviously a robot lawyer is not good for everything, but it’s useful for basic stuff.

The Architect’s Newspaper: Congress authorizes new Smithsonian museums dedicated to American Latino and women’s history

The Architect’s Newspaper: Congress authorizes new Smithsonian museums dedicated to American Latino and women’s history. “The future presence of a pair of new Smithsonian museums, the National Museum of the American Latino and the Women’s National History Museum, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was secured late last night after Congress approved their creation as part of a $2.3 trillion omnibus spending bill.”

Courthouse News: Treasure Sold During Holocaust Fought Over at High Court

Courthouse News: Treasure Sold During Holocaust Fought Over at High Court. “The 42 silver religious artifacts are part of what is known as the Welfenschatz or the Guelph Treasure — said by some sources to have been gifted to Adolph Hitler himself by Hermann Goering, the Nazi leader of the state of Prussia. For decades, the treasure has been displayed at the Museum of Decorative Arts in Berlin. The Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, which owns the collection and runs the museum, denies modern assertions that the artifacts were sold during the Holocaust at below-market value. Today, with the heirs of two Holocaust victims seeking to have U.S. courts declare them as the rightful owners of the collection, the museum is joined by the German and Hungarian governments in seeking to have a pair of cases thrown out.”

Online courts: reimagining the future of justice (Harvard Law Today)

Harvard Law Today: Online courts: reimagining the future of justice. “Even if there was no COVID-19, online courts would still be the wave of the future. This idea was the starting point for a recent webinar, ‘Online Courts: Perspectives from the Bench and the Bar,’ during which experts from the United States and the United Kingdom examined future prospects for online litigation, and its successes and failures to date.”

Court Hands Journalists a Big Freedom of Information Act Win: Gun Data Access (CityBeat)

CityBeat: Court Hands Journalists a Big Freedom of Information Act Win: Gun Data Access. “Reveal, the Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), originally sued for records in November 2017. The Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) never responded. ATF’s gun tracing database lists 6.8 million firearms linked to criminal activity. Reveal sought records for any gun traced back to law enforcement ownership. When Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in 1966, modern databases did not exist. ATF argued that a search query exporting the results amounted to a ‘new’ record, which agencies aren’t required to disclose under the FOIA statute. The court disagreed.”

Politico: Justices express qualms about sweeping computer crime law

Politico: Justices express qualms about sweeping computer crime law. “During arguments in a case involving a Georgia police officer convicted of violating the 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act by accessing a license plate database, the justices pushed a Justice Department lawyer to explain how a ruling in the government’s favor wouldn’t open the door to prosecutions of innocuous behavior. Those could include browsing Instagram on a work computer or performing public-spirited security research to test a system for vulnerabilities.”