New York Times: How Looming Privacy Regulations May Strengthen Facebook and Google

New York Times: How Looming Privacy Regulations May Strengthen Facebook and Google. “In Europe and the United States, the conventional wisdom is that regulation is needed to force Silicon Valley’s digital giants to respect people’s online privacy. But new rules may instead serve to strengthen Facebook’s and Google’s hegemony and extend their lead on the internet.”

Bloomberg Quint: Google Aims at Privacy Law After Facebook Lobbying Failed

Bloomberg Quint: Google Aims at Privacy Law After Facebook Lobbying Failed. “While Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg were publicly apologizing this month for failing to protect users’ information, Google’s lobbyists were drafting measures to de-fang an Illinois law recognized as the most rigorous consumer privacy statute in the country. Their ambition: to strip language from a decade-old policy that regulates the use of fingerprints, iris scans and facial recognition technology, and insert a loophole for companies embracing the use of biometrics.”

BetaNews: Martin Lewis suing Facebook over fake ads

BetaNews: Martin Lewis suing Facebook over fake ads. “We reported just over a week ago that fake ads promoting cryptocurrency scams were using the names of leading UK business figures. Now one of those whose names has been featured, consumer advice expert Martin Lewis, is suing Facebook for defamation over the use of his face and name.”

Times of Malta: Britain hints it may regulate young people’s use of social media

Times of Malta: Britain hints it may regulate young people’s use of social media. “Britain’s health minister Jeremy Hunt threatened to impose new regulations on social media firms unless they do more to protect young people using their services. Hunt said the groups were ‘turning a blind eye’ to the effect social media had on children’s well-being – an accusation that comes as Facebook and others face heightened scrutiny worldwide over their impact and influence.”

Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions

Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions. “What if you could pay a fine for a traffic offense with a post online? In southwestern China, traffic violators get off the hook over a minor offense if they admit to their blunder on social media—and earn at least 20 likes, reports Beijing News.”

Campaign Finance Institute: Introducing CFI’s Groundbreaking Database Of State Campaign Finance Laws

Campaign Finance Institute: Introducing CFI’s Groundbreaking Database Of State Campaign Finance Laws. “The Campaign Finance Institute is pleased to release a groundbreaking new tool, ‘CFI’s Historical Database of State Campaign Finance Laws’. The database covers all of the states’ campaign finance laws every two years since 1996. It is designed for everything from interactive and visualized lookups to downloadable datasets. “

JD Supra: Pennsylvania Superior Court Adopts New Standard for Social Media Evidence

JD Supra: Pennsylvania Superior Court Adopts New Standard for Social Media Evidence. “In Commonwealth v. Mangel, 2018 WL 1322179 (March 15, 2018), the Pennsylvania Superior Court adopted a standard for authenticating social media posts under Pennsylvania Rule of Evidence 901. The Court held that ‘the proponent of social media evidence must present direct or circumstantial evidence that tends to corroborate the identity of the author of the communication in question, such as testimony from the person who sent or received the communication, or contextual clues in the communication tending to reveal the identity of the sender.'”