Ars Technica: NYT sues FCC, says it hid evidence of Russia meddling in net neutrality repeal

Ars Technica: NYT sues FCC, says it hid evidence of Russia meddling in net neutrality repeal. “The New York Times has sued the Federal Communications Commission over the agency’s refusal to release records that the Times believes might shed light on Russian interference in the net neutrality repeal proceeding.”

The Register: Biz! Formerly! Known! As! Yahoo! Settles! Data! Breach! Cases! To! The! Tune! Of! $47m!

The Register: Biz! Formerly! Known! As! Yahoo! Settles! Data! Breach! Cases! To! The! Tune! Of! $47m!. “The company formerly known as Yahoo! is close to settling cases related to the mammoth data security breach it covered up almost four years ago at a cost of around $47m. In its latest SEC filing, Altaba, as Yahoo is now known, said various legal actions spawned by the 2014 attack were nearly resolved.”

Ottawa Sun: Ottawa lawyers file proposed $80-million class-action lawsuit against Google

Ottawa Sun: Ottawa lawyers file proposed $80-million class-action lawsuit against Google. “Two Ottawa lawyers have filed a proposed $80-million class-action lawsuit, alleging that Google’s search engine allows Internet users to discover names that are supposed to be shielded by court-ordered publication bans.”

Los Angles Times: Net neutrality activists and state officials are taking FCC to court. Here’s how they’ll argue the case

Los Angeles Times: Net neutrality activists and state officials are taking FCC to court. Here’s how they’ll argue the case. “Opponents of the Federal Communications Commission have outlined their chief arguments on net neutrality to a federal appeals court in Washington, in hopes of undoing the FCC’s move last year to repeal its own rules for internet service providers. The legal briefs reflect a widening front in the multi-pronged campaign by consumer groups and tech companies to rescue regulations that originally barred providers from blocking websites or slowing them down. With the FCC’s changes, internet service providers may legally manipulate internet traffic as it travels over their infrastructure, so long as they disclose their practices to consumers.”