Reuters: Google faces $5 billion lawsuit in U.S. for tracking ‘private’ internet use

Reuters: Google faces $5 billion lawsuit in U.S. for tracking ‘private’ internet use. “Google was sued on Tuesday in a proposed class action accusing the internet search company of illegally invading the privacy of millions of users by pervasively tracking their internet use through browsers set in ‘private’ mode. The lawsuit seeks at least $5 billion (4 billion pounds), accusing the Alphabet Inc unit of surreptitiously collecting information about what people view online and where they browse, despite their using what Google calls Incognito mode.”

Bloomberg Quint: Ex-Google Engineer Who Became Right-Wing Hero Ends Suit Quietly

Bloomberg Quint: Ex-Google Engineer Who Became Right-Wing Hero Ends Suit Quietly. “A lawsuit that made a big bang in Silicon Valley two years ago with allegations of mistreatment of politically conservative tech workers came to a quiet end this week. Former Google engineer James Damore and three other men who worked for or applied for jobs at the Alphabet Inc. unit asked a court to dismiss their lawsuit. Their written request was joined by Google.”

Association of American Publishers: Publishers File Suit Against Internet Archive for Systematic Mass Scanning and Distribution of Literary Works

Association of American Publishers: Publishers File Suit Against Internet Archive for Systematic Mass Scanning and Distribution of Literary Works . “Today, member companies of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Internet Archive (‘IA’) in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. The suit asks the Court to enjoin IA’s mass scanning, public display, and distribution of entire literary works, which it offers to the public at large through global-facing businesses coined ‘Open Library’ and ‘National Emergency Library,’ accessible at both openlibrary.org and archive.org.”

The Verge: Social media bias lawsuits keep failing in court

The Verge: Social media bias lawsuits keep failing in court. “An appeals court in Washington, DC just rejected a complaint by Laura Loomer, the conservative activist who was banned from Twitter for anti-Muslim tweets and later chained herself to the company’s headquarters in protest. Loomer argued that Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Apple had all colluded to suppress conservative content, violating Loomer’s First Amendment rights in the process. The court disagreed and threw out the suit.”

CNN: The ACLU sues Clearview AI, calling the tool an ‘unprecedented violation’ of privacy rights

CNN: The ACLU sues Clearview AI, calling the tool an ‘unprecedented violation’ of privacy rights. “The American Civil Liberties Union is suing Clearview AI, the maker of a facial-recognition tool used by law enforcement agencies across the country. The ACLU alleges that Clearview’s technology runs afoul of the 2008 Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, according to the complaint, filed Thursday in the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois.”

News & Observer: Inmates file coronavirus lawsuit seeking more releases from Butner federal prison in NC

News & Observer: Inmates file coronavirus lawsuit seeking more releases from Butner federal prison in NC. “Attorneys for 11 inmates filed the suit in the U.S. Eastern District Court of North Carolina and have asked a judge to name an expert to identify all vulnerable inmates who then can be released within 24 hours. The inmates are being represented by the Charlotte law firm Winston & Strawn, the ACLU and the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs.”

Politico: California church appeals to U.S. Supreme Court over lockdown

Politico: California church appeals to U.S. Supreme Court over lockdown. “The battle over the impact of coronavirus lockdown measures on Americans’ religious observances has reached the Supreme Court as a Southern California church and its pastor made an emergency appeal for relief from executive orders issued by Gov. Gavin Newsom. Lawyers for the South Bay United Pentecostal Church and Bishop Arthur Hodges asked the justices to step in Sunday after a federal appeals court panel rejected a similar emergency application Friday.”