Reuters: U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google privacy settlement

Reuters: U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google privacy settlement. “U.S. Supreme Court justices, in an internet privacy case involving Google(GOOGL.O), disagreed on Wednesday over whether to rein in a form of settlement in class action lawsuits that awards money to charities and other third parties instead of to people affected by the alleged wrongdoing.”

BuzzFeed News: Ancestry. com Is In Cahoots With Public Records Agencies, A Group Suspects

BuzzFeed News: Ancestry.com Is In Cahoots With Public Records Agencies, A Group Suspects. “I know that Michael Peck, my great-great-great-grandfather, died on July 14, 1922. I know this because last October I visited the cemetery in Cornwall, New York, to find the date on his headstone. I had been searching for information on Michael for almost a decade on Ancestry.com, but never found any information about his death. Had I waited until a few weeks ago, I could have saved myself the trip upstate. Ancestry finally added the New York State Death Index for 1852–1956 to its collection, and I would have found Michael’s date of death with a few clicks of a mouse. This new archive on Ancestry, however, was added under questionable circumstances, one genealogist claims.”

Reuters: Google wants Supreme Court to hear Oracle copyright case – just not quite yet

Reuters: Google wants Supreme Court to hear Oracle copyright case – just not quite yet. “The billion-dollar copyright war between Google and Oracle has arrived at the U.S. Supreme Court. Sort of. On Friday, Google filed a request for an extension of its deadline to petition for review of the Federal U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling (886 F.3d 1179) last March that Google did not make fair use of Oracle America’s Java code in creating the Android platform.”

CNET: Facebook accused of misleading advertisers, then trying to hide it

CNET: Facebook accused of misleading advertisers, then trying to hide it. “Facebook knew it was misleading advertisers about the average time users spent watching videos long before admitting it. And it tried to shift attention from the error, a lawsuit says. The social network revealed in September 2016 that it artificially inflated the metric for two years because it only counted videos as viewed if they had been watched for three or more seconds — failing to taking shorter views into account — and possibly misleading advertisers.”

Business Insider: The 21-year-old who built a robot lawyer to fight parking tickets has a new tool to help you automatically sue companies who get hacked

Business Insider: The 21-year-old who built a robot lawyer to fight parking tickets has a new tool to help you automatically sue companies who get hacked. “In 2018, [Joshua] Browder took aim at Equifax after a data breach exposed the personal data the firm held on tens of millions of Americans, and his app DoNotPay was used to help file 25,000 lawsuits against the company. The British entrepreneur is now expanding into privacy and data security. On Wednesday, he announced that DoNotPay will now help users easily lock the privacy settings on their social media accounts — and help sue those companies that expose users’ data through hacks and breaches.”

Ars Technica: Google+ users, upset over data leak, sue Google

From Ars Technica, and to absolutely nobody’s surprise: Google+ users, upset over data leak, sue Google. “It was only a matter of time—the same day that Google announced it was shutting down Google+ in the wake of a data leak, two users filed a proposed class-action lawsuit in federal court in San Francisco, saying that their privacy had been violated.”