Engadget: The new Assassin’s Creed educational tour lets you explore the Viking Age

Engadget: The new Assassin’s Creed educational tour lets you explore the Viking Age. “Assassin’s Creed Discovery Tours can offer valuable educational insights into historical periods, and that may be particularly true for the latest instalment. Ubisoft has released a Discovery Tour: Viking Age update for Assassin’s Creed Valhalla that gives you the chance to explore Viking-era England and Norway without the usual conflicts. There’s a new format, however. Rather than go on guided tours and visit exhibits, you assume the roles of four Anglo-Saxon and Viking characters (such as Anglo-Saxon king Alfred the Great and a Viking merchant) as they undertake eight quests that illustrate their daily lives.” You do not have to buy the video game to get the educational tour; a stand-alone version is available for $20.

Wolfram Blog: Change Your Perspective on the History of Mathematics with These Eight Learning Journeys

Wolfram Blog: Change Your Perspective on the History of Mathematics with These Eight Learning Journeys. “Amid COVID’s first wave, I had the privilege to join forces with Eric Weisstein and his team at Wolfram Research to create the History of Mathematics Project, a virtual interactive gallery highlighting physical artifacts that are important to the history of mathematics, for the National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) in New York City. Most of my mandatory confinement at home was spent navigating through online collections from world-class museums, locating outstanding mathematical artifacts and creating interactive and computational explanations for them.”

Google Blog: Expanding access to computer science education with Code.org

Google Blog: Expanding access to computer science education with Code.org. “Last month, 35 classrooms and over 1,000 students signed up to hear from Taylor Roper, a Program Manager on Google’s Responsible AI team…. These virtual chats and field trips are part of Code.org’s new CS Journeys program to help students use their computer science (CS) knowledge and skills beyond the classroom, and discover CS in unexpected places. Students hear directly from professionals who use computer science in unique and creative ways, like modeling the universe, building robots, or — in Taylor’s case — helping to build responsible artificial intelligence tools for products used by millions of people.”

Getty: Introducing Becoming Artsy

Getty: Introducing Becoming Artsy . “Take a dynamic ride through Getty’s collections, laboratories, gardens, and more with Becoming Artsy, a new YouTube series. Host Jessie Hendricks brings viewers along while she explores the world of art. ‘What is a museum?’ she asks, and, ‘how do I experience art?’ ​She brings her curiosity and enthusiasm as she meets the people who make Getty’s art accessible to everyone.”

Raspberry Pi Foundation: Introducing raspberrypi.com

Raspberry Pi Foundation: Introducing raspberrypi.com. “As well as being able to learn about and purchase the full range of hardware products, on the new website you can download our latest software, find detailed technical documentation, connect with the community on the forums, and read the latest news about Raspberry Pi technologies and how they’re being used to change the world.”

Google Blog: Teaching with Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Teaching with Google Arts & Culture. “Whether it’s taking art selfies, playing puzzle parties with friends, or diving into richly documented resources about US Black History or Inventions and Discoveries in history, Google Arts & Culture has been a valuable learning companion to people of all ages and backgrounds. And today, we are releasing a new Teacher Guide – a dedicated resource for educators to make learning with Arts & Culture and using the platform in class easier than ever.”

Grand Island Independent: UNL’s annual BugFest event goes virtual this year

Grand Island Independent: UNL’s annual BugFest event goes virtual this year “The online event is designed to create a comfortable space for families and friends to learn about insects and science through family-oriented activities. Attendees can learn about bee biology, learn how to draw insects, view Nebraska insects, see insects with a blacklight and participate in at-home, hands-on activities. All activities and videos were created by entomology students, faculty and staff.”

ReviewGeek: You Can (and Should) Learn Almost Anything for Free

ReviewGeek: You Can (and Should) Learn Almost Anything for Free. “People with a bit of spare time and access to a smartphone or PC can pick up anything—from an interesting new hobby to skills that could take their career to the next level— without spending a penny. It can also be a handy way to kill some time. Despite most recreational travel prospects being out of the window, language learning app Duolingo saw a massive increase in its userbase last year. Below are a few examples of skills you can pick up without picking up your wallet first.” An ambitious headline that delivers a resource-filled article.

Women Love Tech: Ada Twist, Scientist Encourages Kids to Enjoy Science with Netflix

Women Love Tech: Ada Twist, Scientist Encourages Kids to Enjoy Science with Netflix. “Netflix has released Ada Twist, Scientist with the goal of making science fun and accessible for everyone. The animated show follows 8-year-old Ada, a small scientist with a big sense of curiosity. She explores science to discover the truth about everything from chain reactions to evaporation. The series encourages children to be curious about their surroundings and take an active interest in why things happen and how things work.”

How to Make Comics: Ideas, Activities, and Resources for Learning and Making (Museum of Modern Art)

Museum of Modern Art: How to Make Comics: Ideas, Activities, and Resources for Learning and Making. “Over the course of three articles, writer and comics scholar Chris Gavaler helped us understand what comics are, the potential of the art form, and some of the many approaches to making comics. Still, for many of us, starting with a blank sheet of paper can be daunting—even when we know the basic ideas for filling in the page. To conclude the How to Make Comics series, we wanted to offer a step-by-step approach you can follow in order to transform that blank sheet into a visual story that’s all your own.”

Warbird Digest: Rare Short Films Now Online Digital Delights

Warbird Digest: Rare Short Films Now Online Digital Delights. “Eighty-six selections from The Museum of Flight’s collection of rare, behind-the-scenes movies have been digitized for the first time and are now online. The films date from World War I to Apollo 13. Most of the films are privately shot footage and home movies that offer surprising views of local culture and aerospace history not available anywhere else. Highlights include home movies of flight attendants at work and leisure circa 1940; making and flying German fighters in 1918; Alaska bush flying the 1940s; Aerocar fun in 1968; and Bill Boeing partying with friends circa 1930.”

Digital Photography Review: Historik app uses AR to combine the modern world with historical events, landmarks

Digital Photography Review: Historik app uses AR to combine the modern world with historical events, landmarks. “Augmented reality (AR) may be modern technology, but entrepreneur Chris Whalen wants to use the tech and a new app, Historik, to bring back the past. Using a smartphone with AR capabilities, Historik can recreate historic buildings and objects at specific markers and let users learn more about the past, swipe through artifacts and even explore an old area in full 3D. Users will even be able to set up self-guided tours.”

Penn State News: Online course shapes COVID-19 curriculum in schools nationwide

Penn State News: Online course shapes COVID-19 curriculum in schools nationwide. “In February 2021, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at Penn State released an online course called ‘The Science of COVID-19.’ Led by faculty in the College of Education’s Center for Science and the Schools (CSATS), the course was designed to give middle- and high-school students an opportunity to learn about how scientists approach and tackle a novel virus. Since then, the free course has reached about 2,500 teachers and students in all 50 states in the nation, and plans are underway to modify the course so that it remains timely and relevant for years to come.”

Mashble: 8 podcasts to teach kids about history, identity, and current events

Mashable: 8 podcasts to teach kids about history, identity, and current events. “There are many child-friendly podcasts out there that explore topics that aren’t often included in traditional curriculums. You can listen to them in the car on the way to school or sports practices, and they can spark questions around difficult topics like racism or identity — in an age-appropriate way.”