ACRL TechConnect: We mapped it so you don’t have to

ACRL TechConnect: We mapped it so you don’t have to. “There are a lot of mapping platforms, both open source and proprietary, available. Each have their idiosyncrasies and limitations, and they can be difficult to fit to a specific research request. Our most common request sounds something like this: ‘I would like to make a map with the Neatline plugin on my WordPress site using Leaflet with a historic map basemap, a time slider, and showing four kinds of data.’ For those who build maps all the time, you likely recognize that most of these elements don’t go together, or would require quite a bit of custom work. It’s our job to determine what is actually needed and what level of complexity is required by the data. Ideally we will be able to help this researcher create a map independently. Though we count a GIS expert as a member of our team, we recognize that this is not the norm for everyone. Therefore, we will discuss the options we most often use with researchers so that, going forward, these researchers will be able to make their own maps using any data they may create.”

Quartz: 200 universities just launched 600 free online courses. Here’s the full list.

Quartz: 200 universities just launched 600 free online courses. Here’s the full list.. “If you haven’t heard, universities around the world are offering their courses online for free (or at least partially free). These courses are collectively called MOOCs or Massive Open Online Courses. In the past six years or so, close to 800 universities have created more than 8,000 of these MOOCs. And I’ve been keeping track of these MOOCs the entire time over at Class Central, ever since they rose to prominence.” This is a giant list.

Homework help: Skip the in-person tutor with online courses, which we rate (USA Today)

USA Today: Homework help: Skip the in-person tutor with online courses, which we rate . “All jokes about ‘new math’ aside — have you tried to help your kids with their homework lately? A growing number of online, on-demand tutoring services might just be your saving grace. The K–12 online tutoring market will grow to nearly $121 billion by 2021 from around $64 billion in 2016, according to market researcher Technavio. One of the biggest reasons? The on-demand aspect tackles an immediate need, in a way that resonates with today’s tech-savvy students.”

Introducing: ImaginePhD! A career exploration tool for humanities & social science grad students (Notre Dame)

Notre Dame: Introducing: ImaginePhD! A career exploration tool for humanities & social science grad students . “We are excited to announce the launch of ImaginePhD – a free, online career exploration and planning tool designed specifically for Ph.D. students and postdoctoral scholars in humanities and social sciences…. Developed by experts from over 50 universities as part of the Graduate Career Consortium (GCC), ImaginePhD offers a unique platform that teaches PhDs about popular job sectors, search strategies, and how to transfer skills across settings.” This is a Notre Dame announcement, but the ImaginePhD site is useful for students everywhere. It’s also free.

Upfront with NGS: FREE NARA 2017 Virtual Genealogy Fair (save the date — 25 October 2017)

Upfront with NGS: FREE NARA 2017 Virtual Genealogy Fair (save the date — 25 October 2017). “The National Archives will host a live, virtual Genealogy Fair via webcast on YouTube. Participate in our biggest genealogy event of the year! Sessions offer advice on family history research for all skill levels. Topics include Federal government documents on birth, childhood, and death; recently recovered military personnel files; Japanese Americans during World War II; 19th century tax assessments; and a ‘how to’ on preserving family heirlooms. For the schedule, videos, handouts, and participation instructions, visit the Virtual Genealogy Fair online.”

Nieman Lab: Bunk aims to set history free with a site that doesn’t feel like a textbook

NiemanLab: Bunk aims to set history free with a site that doesn’t feel like a textbook. “Bunk, which takes its name from the 1916 Henry Ford quote that ‘history is bunk,’ launched in beta earlier this month. “A big part of this project is amplifying what’s already out there online,” said Tony Field, the site’s editor. ‘There’s so much great work being done online by scholars already. That includes blogs, conversations on social media between historians — there’s a very active community of historians on Twitter — not to mention all of the great digital archives all over the place, and digital humanities work based at universities and elsewhere. We were very interested in what it would mean to try to harness all of that energy and make it accessible to a broader audience of people who aren’t, say, historians on Twitter.'”