Mashable: 4 podcasts to teach kids about history, identity, and current events

Mashable: 4 podcasts to teach kids about history, identity, and current events . “As your child heads back to school, you may be looking for appropriate ways to bolster the education they’re getting in the classroom. But how do you determine what’s suitable for their grade level but also inclusive and entertaining enough that they won’t be bored to tears? Try podcasts.” It’s only four, but they’re thoroughly described and I want to listen to them now.

Lifehacker: Find Hundreds of Science Experiment Ideas in ‘Scientific American’

Lifehacker: Find Hundreds of Science Experiment Ideas in ‘Scientific American’. “A big part of being a kid is building things, deconstructing things and, in general, discovering how things work—that’s why we buy those starter science experiment kits and toy microscopes to encourage their curiosity. But it’s easy to run out of ideas to keep them interested in science, especially as they get older. Luckily for parents, Scientific American has for years been developing an archive of hundreds of science experiments for kids ages 6-12 to conduct with their parents.”

TechCrunch: Google discloses its acquisition of mobile learning app Socratic as it relaunches on iOS

TechCrunch: Google discloses its acquisition of mobile learning app Socratic as it relaunches on iOS. “Google publicly disclosed its acquisition of homework helper app Socratic in an announcement this week, detailing the added support for the company’s AI technology and its relaunch on iOS. The acquisition apparently flew under the radar — Google says it bought the app last year.”

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”

Boolean search for social media monitoring: What to track, how to track, and why (Search Engine Watch)

Search Engine Watch: Boolean search for social media monitoring: What to track, how to track, and why. If you have any experience with social media monitoring platforms, you know that getting precise results may be tricky at times: Apps can show a lot of noise for brands with common names or, quite the contrary, miss some valuable data behind due to the restrictive filters. That’s when Boolean search fits in perfectly.”

Inside the story of Emmett Till: FSU professor launches app with digital perspective of civil rights icon (Florida State University)

Florida State University: Inside the story of Emmett Till: FSU professor launches app with digital perspective of civil rights icon. “A Florida State University professor’s five-year research project has opened a new window of understanding about the brutal murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till in 1955 that became a catalyst of the civil rights movement. Davis Houck, FSU’s Fannie Lou Hamer Professor of Rhetorical Studies in the College of Communication and Information, and his colleagues have launched the Emmett Till Memory Project app and website documenting locations linked with Till’s murder in Mississippi.”

CBC: Hear Indigenous language speakers from around the globe through Google Earth

CBC: Hear Indigenous language speakers from around the globe through Google Earth. “Users of Google Earth are now able to hear over 50 Indigenous language speakers from across the globe saying words and simple phrases and even singing traditional songs. The project, called Celebrating Indigenous Languages, is designed to honour the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages.”