Defamation in the Google age: search engines as publishers of defamatory content (Lexology)

Lexology: Defamation in the Google age: search engines as publishers of defamatory content. “In the recent decision of Defteros v Google LLC [2020] VSC 219, the Supreme Court of Victoria held search engine Google liable for ‘publishing’ defamatory material. In doing so, the decision has extended the reach of defamation to encompass those who make available defamatory material originally published by a third party by way of hyperlinks.”

Wall Street Journal: How to Police Facebook and Google Like a Public Place

Wall Street Journal: How to Police Facebook and Google Like a Public Place. “In 1928, a woman named Mary Donoghue bought a bottle of ginger beer from a cafe in Paisley, Scotland, and then fell ill after finding a dead snail inside. She sued the manufacturer and won. The ruling enshrined the concept of ‘duty of care’—a legal obligation to protect a customer, tenant or worker from harm. ‘The rule that you are to love your neighbor becomes in law “You must not injure your neighbor,”‘ proclaimed Lord Atkin of Aberdovey, who presided over the case in 1932 in Britain’s House of Lords, which reversed two lower courts to rule for Donoghue. Now, as Western regulators struggle with how to restrict the most harmful online content while at the same time protecting free speech, Britain has come to see the nearly century-old principle as a possible solution.”

CNET: Georgia’s Supreme Court issues a landmark decision on vehicle data privacy

CNET: Georgia’s Supreme Court issues a landmark decision on vehicle data privacy. “Back in 2014, a man named Victor Mobley was driving his 2014 Dodge Charger along a tree-lined road in Henry County, Georgia. Two people in a 1999 Chevrolet Corvette pulled out from a driveway and were hit by Mobley. They died, and Mobley survived.”

Techdirt: Supreme Court Signals Loud And Clear That Social Media Sites Are Not Public Forums That Have To Allow All Speech

Techdirt: Supreme Court Signals Loud And Clear That Social Media Sites Are Not Public Forums That Have To Allow All Speech. “Last fall I wrote about the Supreme Court agreeing to hear a case that some argued would allow the Supreme Court to declare that social media sites were public forums thereby limiting their ability to block or ban certain users.”

The ChronicleHerald: Federal Court sidesteps constitutional questions — for now — in Google ‘right to be forgotten’ case

The ChronicleHerald: Federal Court sidesteps constitutional questions — for now — in Google ‘right to be forgotten’ case. “Google LLC was handed a setback this month in a case over the so-called ‘right to be forgotten’ when a Federal Court adjudicator ruled that it won’t delve into the thorny constitutional questions wrapped up in the matter. Instead, the Federal Court will judge two specific points related to Canada’s privacy law, in a reference case brought forward by federal privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Press protections might safeguard Google’s algorithms, even from Trump

Columbia Journalism Review: Press protections might safeguard Google’s algorithms, even from Trump. “Regulating algorithms might seem like entirely new legal territory, since Google and its cousins are only two decades old. But a newspaper case from 1974 has quite a bit to say about whether the government can control, under the First Amendment, companies’ algorithms and how they produce and organize information.”

Wired: Microsoft’s Supreme Court Case Has Big Implications For Data

Wired: Microsoft’s Supreme Court Case Has Big Implications For Data . “FIVE YEARS AGO, US law enforcement served Microsoft a search warrant for emails as part of a US drug trafficking investigation. In response, Microsoft handed over data stored on American servers, like the person’s address book. But it didn’t give the government the actual content of the individual’s emails, because they were stored at a Microsoft data center in Dublin, Ireland, where the subject said he lived when he signed up for his Outlook account. In a case that begins Tuesday, the Supreme Court will decide whether those borders matter when it comes to data.”