CNET: Going to court online is supposed to be safer. For many, it’s actually much worse

CNET: Going to court online is supposed to be safer. For many, it’s actually much worse. “For many immigration cases, testimony from a witness — a co-worker, a friend or relative — able to come to court and vouch for you is critical for the defense of why you should be allowed to stay in the country. But with courts going online because of the coronavirus pandemic, defendants aren’t afforded that help in some cases. Virtual courtrooms have taken away many of the resources that lawyers and defendants rely on, attorneys say, including basic necessities like being able to talk with each other in private and having an interpreter present for non-English speakers.”

Burden of Proof: Inside Bosnia’s War Trial Case Archives (Balkan Transitional Justice)

Balkan Transitional Justice: Burden of Proof: Inside Bosnia’s War Trial Case Archives. “Bosnia’s state court is rapidly running out of space for its ever-growing multitude of documents and evidence from war crimes trials, while the lack of an online archive is hampering lawyers and impeding public access to information.”

N.Y.’s Legal Limbo: Pandemic Creates Backlog of 39,200 Criminal Cases (New York Times)

New York Times: N.Y.’s Legal Limbo: Pandemic Creates Backlog of 39,200 Criminal Cases. “Since February, the backlog of pending cases in the city’s criminal courts has risen by nearly a third — to 39,200. Hundreds of jury trials in the city have been put on hold indefinitely. Arraignments, pleas and evidentiary hearings are being held by video, with little public scrutiny. Prosecutions have dropped off, too, as the authorities have tried to reduce the jail population.”

Courthouse News Service: Coronavirus Controls Bring Live Audio Finally to Supreme Court

Courthouse News Service: Coronavirus Controls Bring Live Audio Finally to Supreme Court. “In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the court had delayed two rounds of arguments set for the end of March and April, pushing off some of the most highly anticipated and politically consequential arguments of its term. In the meantime, the court has held remote conferences on Fridays and continued releasing opinions and orders lists while the justices and most court staff works remotely.”

Irish Legal News: New website tracks use of online courts amid coronavirus pandemic

Irish Legal News: New website tracks use of online courts amid coronavirus pandemic. “Legal technologist Professor Richard Susskind, who is president of the Society for Computers and Law, said remotecourts.org is ‘designed to help the global community of justice workers – judges, lawyers, court officials, litigants, court technologists – to share their experiences of “remote” alternatives to traditional court hearings’.”

Free Law Project: Uploading PACER Dockets and Oral Argument Recordings to the Internet Archive

Free Law Project: Uploading PACER Dockets and Oral Argument Recordings to the Internet Archive. “Part of our mission at Free Law Project is to share this information and to ensure its long-term distribution and preservation. A great way to do that is to give it to a neutral third party so that no matter what happens, the information will always be available. For years, we have been lucky to partner with the Internet Archive for this purpose and today we are pleased to share two pieces of news about how we give them information.”

CNET: China has an actual court dedicated to the internet

CNET: China has an actual court dedicated to the internet. “Those disputes typically involve online shopping, service contracts, lending, copyrights and domains. Xinhua cited An Fengde, vice president of the Beijing Higher People’s Court, as saying the number of internet-related cases are rising rapidly in China. In the first eight months of this year, Beijing’s courts were reportedly stuffed with 37,631 online-related disputes, up 24.4 percent compared with the same period last year.”

Miami Herald: Do Trump’s tweets contaminate 9/11 trial? War court judge to decide.

Miami Herald: Do Trump’s tweets contaminate 9/11 trial? War court judge to decide.. “President Donald Trump’s incendiary remarks about military justice stirred a dramatic exchange in a hearing Thursday for the accused conspirators of the 9/11 attacks, with defense lawyers arguing that the commander-in-chief exerted unlawful influence. At issue are Trump’s remarks on Twitter and in person about the decision to give no prison time to Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl and to urge the death penalty on a man who had not yet been charged for driving a van through a New York City bike path, killing eight people.”

Lexology: Rise of the Super Injunctions – actions taken against Twitter and Google

Lexology: Rise of the Super Injunctions – actions taken against Twitter and Google. “The New South Wales Supreme Court has recently ordered a worldwide injunction against Twitter to prevent the publication of confidential financial information. Whilst the granting of an injunction to prevent disclosure of confidential information is common, the scope of the injunction (that it apply globally) is a growing phenomenon within common law countries such Australia, Canada, Hong Kong and the United Kingdom. Generally, an injunction will only apply within the jurisdiction of the Court. However, global (or super) injunctions are becoming more common, especially in media and/or defamation cases.”

Legal Intelligencer: Superior Court Adopts Standard for Authenticating Social Media Posts

Legal Intelligencer: Superior Court Adopts Standard for Authenticating Social Media Posts. “Noting how easily social networking accounts can be faked or hacked, the Pennsylvania Superior Court has ruled in a case of first impression that social media posts are inadmissible in criminal cases unless prosecutors can present evidence of who actually authored them.”

Harvard Law Today: Documenting the Nuremberg Trials

Harvard Law Today: Documenting the Nuremberg Trials. “The Harvard Law School Library uniquely owns and manages approximately one million pages of documents relating to the Nuremberg Trials: thirteen trials conducted just after World War II to prosecute leaders of the Nazi regime. To preserve the contents of these documents—which include trial transcripts and full trial exhibits—the library has undertaken a multi-stage digitization project to make the collection freely accessible online. This video offers a brief glimpse of the project and its dedicated staff.” The video is a little less than six minutes long.

University of Virginia: Law Library Uncovers Hidden Legal Histories with Scottish Court of Session Digital Archive

University of Virginia: Law Library Uncovers Hidden Legal Histories with Scottish Court of Session Digital Archive. “Thirty years after the University of Virginia School of Law acquired a trove of legal documents from Scotland’s Court of Session, the supreme legal court there, the Law School’s Arthur J. Morris Law Library is building a digital archive and reaching out to partners ‘across the pond’ to open these legal history materials to scholars and the public. When complete, the archive will provide users with access to the previously hidden histories of people living through an era of profound change.”

Georgetown Law: Trump Twitter Use Violates First Amendment, Argue Scholars in Brief by Georgetown Law’s ICAP

Georgetown Law: Trump Twitter Use Violates First Amendment, Argue Scholars in Brief by Georgetown Law’s ICAP. “President Trump’s use of Twitter violates the First Amendment, Georgetown Law’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection (ICAP) argued in an amicus brief that it filed today on behalf of leading First Amendment scholars such as Erwin Chemerinsky, Lyrissa Lidsky, and Larry Tribe. The brief supports a lawsuit brought by Columbia’s Knight Institute challenging Trump’s practice of blocking critics from his @realDonaldTrump Twitter feed.”