Courthouse News Service: Coronavirus Controls Bring Live Audio Finally to Supreme Court

Courthouse News Service: Coronavirus Controls Bring Live Audio Finally to Supreme Court. “In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the court had delayed two rounds of arguments set for the end of March and April, pushing off some of the most highly anticipated and politically consequential arguments of its term. In the meantime, the court has held remote conferences on Fridays and continued releasing opinions and orders lists while the justices and most court staff works remotely.”

New Straits Times: Malaysian judiciary makes history, uses AI in sentencing

New Straits Times: Malaysian judiciary makes history, uses AI in sentencing. “The Malaysian judiciary made history today by employing Artificial Intelligence (AI) in sentencing in two drug cases – but not without objection from the defence. Counsel Hamid Ismail raised the objection before Magistrate Jessica Ombou Kakayun in defence of his client Denis Modili who was charged under Section 12(2) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952 with possession of 0.01gm of methamphetamine at Kampung Kobusak in Penampang on Dec 16 last year.”

IdeaStream: Ohio’s Judges Considering Statewide Sentencing Database

IdeaStream: Ohio’s Judges Considering Statewide Sentencing Database. “Members of Ohio’s judicial system are calling for more uniformity in sentencing practices across courtrooms. The state’s criminal sentencing commission argues an online database of previous sentences could aid in that effort.”

The Register: Experts warn UK court digitisation is moving too fast and breaking too many things

The Register: Experts warn UK court digitisation is moving too fast and breaking too many things. “Ambitious plans to digitise Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunal Service via a £1bn modernisation programme should be slowed down even further, MPs heard this week. The Ministry of Justice is seeking to cut costs by closing courts and putting services online. That programme is due to be completed in 2023, three years later than originally planned.”

Lexology: Time travel in the Federal Court of Australia – WayBack Machine print-outs admissible* as evidence

Lexology: Time travel in the Federal Court of Australia – WayBack Machine print-outs admissible* as evidence. “On this basis, there would now seem to be some prospect of getting print-outs of web pages obtained via the WayBack Machine into evidence where: (a) the web pages belong to or are otherwise controlled by a party to the proceedings; and (b) discovery has been sought from that other party and not yielded the content of the web pages.”

KUER: Database Sheds Light On Child Deaths During Family Court Cases

KUER: Database Sheds Light On Child Deaths During Family Court Cases. “Over the last decade, more than 700 children have been killed by a parent or guardian in the midst of a family court case like divorce or custody hearings. That’s according to a new database by the Center for Judicial Excellence that for the first time quantifies these deaths — 11 of which occurred in Utah.”

Ars Technica: Algorithms should have made courts more fair. What went wrong?

Ars Technica: Algorithms should have made courts more fair. What went wrong?. “Kentucky lawmakers thought requiring that judges consult an algorithm when deciding whether to hold a defendant in jail before trial would make the state’s justice system cheaper and fairer by setting more people free. That’s not how it turned out.”