Namoi Valley Independent (Australia): New website offers insight into historical Female Factory in Paramatta

Namoi Valley Independent (Australia): New website offers insight into historical Female Factory in Paramatta. “LAST Sunday marked the Bicentenary of the Parramatta Female Factory, an institution which operated as an assignment depot, prison, place of industry and medical facility for approximately 5,000 women and children until its closure in 1848….The City of Parramatta has created a website which details many of the stories of the women who passed through the Factory gates.”

Whistleblowers: Software Bug Keeping Hundreds Of Inmates In Arizona Prisons Beyond Release Dates (KJZZ)

This is a little outside my lane, but I’m sharing it because y’all, it’s horrifying. This isn’t justice. KJZZ: Whistleblowers: Software Bug Keeping Hundreds Of Inmates In Arizona Prisons Beyond Release Dates. “According to Arizona Department of Corrections whistleblowers, hundreds of incarcerated people who should be eligible for release are being held in prison because the inmate management software cannot interpret current sentencing laws. KJZZ is not naming the whistleblowers because they fear retaliation. The employees said they have been raising the issue internally for more than a year, but prison administrators have not acted to fix the software bug. The sources said Chief Information Officer Holly Greene and Deputy Director Joe Profiri have been aware of the problem since 2019.”

Google’s definition of not including bum as ‘private part’ may not be acceptable in Indian context: Mumbai Court (GoaChronicle)

GoaChronicle: Google’s definition of not including bum as ‘private part’ may not be acceptable in Indian context: Mumbai Court. “Clarifying that ‘the term private part is to be interpreted into the context what is meant by it in our society,’ the Court held that Google’s definition of not including bum in private part may not be an acceptable interpretation as far as Indians are concerned.”

AP: Russian hack brings changes, uncertainty to US court system

AP: Russian hack brings changes, uncertainty to US court system. “Trial lawyer Robert Fisher is handling one of America’s most prominent counterintelligence cases, defending an MIT scientist charged with secretly helping China. But how he’ll handle the logistics of the case could feel old school: Under new court rules, he’ll have to print out any highly sensitive documents and hand-deliver them to the courthouse. Until recently, even the most secretive material — about wiretaps, witnesses and national security concerns – could be filed electronically. But that changed after the massive Russian hacking campaign that breached the U.S. court system’s electronic case files and those of scores of other federal agencies and private companies.”

Trump Judge: COVID Business Closures Violate Employers’ Constitutional Rights (Slate)

Slate: Trump Judge: COVID Business Closures Violate Employers’ Constitutional Rights. “On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge William S. Stickman IV, a Donald Trump appointee, blocked Pennsylvania’s COVID-19 restrictions by relying on a combination of conservative dissents, bad precedent, and his own scientific acumen. Stickman appears to be on a mission to forcibly reopen the state—prematurely, in the view of its elected governor—by any means necessary.”

StateTech Magazine: Tech Is Aiding Several Aspects of the Criminal Justice System During the Pandemic

StateTech Magazine: Tech Is Aiding Several Aspects of the Criminal Justice System During the Pandemic. “The coronavirus pandemic has upended all aspects of society, from how work gets done to social gatherings and how people greet one another. It has also posed a significant challenge to the criminal justice system, which has long relied on bringing people into close contact. That’s true for court proceedings, interviewing suspects and conducting parole checkups.”

Reform Austin News: New Texas Supreme Court Order Allows Citation by Social Media

Reform Austin News: New Texas Supreme Court Order Allows Citation by Social Media. “Imagine getting served divorce papers via Facebook where all your friends can see? What about finding out you are being sued on Twitter? The Texas Supreme Court is now allowing process service for civil cases via social media, email or other electronic technology if the traditional service of papers in-person or by mail fails.”

Rapid City Journal: New website lets public search SD court dates

Rapid City Journal: New website lets public search SD court dates. “A new government website allows the public to use any computer to search for upcoming court dates and other information about South Dakota criminal and civil cases…. Before the creation of the eCourts portal, the public and media had to call a clerk or use a computer at a courthouse to look up court dates and other information.”

Slate: Justice, Livestreamed

Slate: Justice, Livestreamed. “The defense lawyer sits in his office—with the defendant, wearing a mask, at a desk behind him—as he takes turns with the prosecutors in questioning the witness, screen-sharing documents at various intervals. This is what court looks like in many parts of the country these days, and in some states, it’s available on YouTube. If you tire of Alcalá’s virtual courtroom, you can jump over to elsewhere in Texas, where child welfare cases are being streamed. Or you could click to Wisconsin or Michigan, where defendants join Zoom via video from the county jails and judges breeze through preliminary hearings and dole out sentences for parole violations.”

Bloomberg Law: Zoom Courts Will Stick Around as Virus Forces Seismic Change

Bloomberg Law: Zoom Courts Will Stick Around as Virus Forces Seismic Change. “Virtual court proceedings will probably outlive the Covid-19 pandemic, as even skeptical judges and lawyers say that they’ve made depositions, oral arguments, and jury selection much more efficient. Courts forced to accelerate years of innovation into weeks may never go back to how they did business before the pandemic, according to interviews with more than 30 state and federal judges, lawyers and court staff in 16 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. The embrace of technology is a revolution for many courts that have historically resisted it.”

ABA Journal: Prosecutor in critical condition with COVID-19 had filed an OSHA complaint

ABA Journal: Prosecutor in critical condition with COVID-19 had filed an OSHA complaint. “A hospitalized prosecutor in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, told colleagues he filed a complaint with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration after becoming ill with COVID-19. Assistant Allegheny County District Attorney Russ Broman, 65, was in critical condition, according to initial reports by CBS Pittsburgh, WXPI and TribLive.”

AP: Courts straining to balance public health with public access

AP: Courts straining to balance public health with public access. “After her son was arrested for allegedly throwing rocks at police during a protest over racial injustice, Tanisha Brown headed to the courthouse in her California hometown to watch her son’s arraignment. She was turned away, told the courthouse was closed to the public because of coronavirus precautions. A day later, the Kern County Superior Court in Bakersfield posted a notice on its website explaining how the public could request special permission from judicial officers to attend court proceedings. But problems with public access have persisted, according to a federal lawsuit filed Friday on behalf of Brown and several others who have been unable to watch court sessions.”

AP: West Virginia Supreme Court Now Has an Instagram Account

AP: West Virginia Supreme Court Now Has an Instagram Account. “People seeking more information about the judiciary in West Virginia can now check the state Supreme Court’s new Instagram account. The court announced this week it is adding Instagram to its social media accounts, which also include Twitter, Facebook, SmugMug, Flickr and YouTube.” Wait – they had a SmugMug account and didn’t have an Instagram account?