The Register: Experts warn UK court digitisation is moving too fast and breaking too many things

The Register: Experts warn UK court digitisation is moving too fast and breaking too many things. “Ambitious plans to digitise Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunal Service via a £1bn modernisation programme should be slowed down even further, MPs heard this week. The Ministry of Justice is seeking to cut costs by closing courts and putting services online. That programme is due to be completed in 2023, three years later than originally planned.”

Lexology: Time travel in the Federal Court of Australia – WayBack Machine print-outs admissible* as evidence

Lexology: Time travel in the Federal Court of Australia – WayBack Machine print-outs admissible* as evidence. “On this basis, there would now seem to be some prospect of getting print-outs of web pages obtained via the WayBack Machine into evidence where: (a) the web pages belong to or are otherwise controlled by a party to the proceedings; and (b) discovery has been sought from that other party and not yielded the content of the web pages.”

KUER: Database Sheds Light On Child Deaths During Family Court Cases

KUER: Database Sheds Light On Child Deaths During Family Court Cases. “Over the last decade, more than 700 children have been killed by a parent or guardian in the midst of a family court case like divorce or custody hearings. That’s according to a new database by the Center for Judicial Excellence that for the first time quantifies these deaths — 11 of which occurred in Utah.”

Ars Technica: Algorithms should have made courts more fair. What went wrong?

Ars Technica: Algorithms should have made courts more fair. What went wrong?. “Kentucky lawmakers thought requiring that judges consult an algorithm when deciding whether to hold a defendant in jail before trial would make the state’s justice system cheaper and fairer by setting more people free. That’s not how it turned out.”

New Zealand Herald: Google under fire again over British backpacker Grace Millane case

New Zealand Herald: Google under fire again over British backpacker Grace Millane case. “Google is once again under fire for failing to remove links showing the identity of the man charged with the murder of British backpacker Grace Millane. Google said it had since removed the material.”

Conviction politics: How convicts shaped Australian democracy (Monash University)

Monash University: Conviction politics: How convicts shaped Australian democracy. “Convicts aren’t often celebrated for their contribution to the nation’s progressive political traditions, and that’s something Associate Professor Tony Moore, Monash historian and head of Communications and Media Studies, is trying to change…. Dr Moore has received an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant of $757,205, together with cash contributions from industry partners of $310,000, to raise awareness of our convict legacy. The work partly involves coding, analysing and visualising recently digitised convict archives.”

The Verge: Errors in cellphone location evidence force Denmark to review 10,000 verdicts

The Verge: Errors in cellphone location evidence force Denmark to review 10,000 verdicts. “Errors in cellphone location data have prompted authorities in Denmark to review 10,700 court cases to see if flawed evidence lead to incorrect convictions. The New York Times reports that the issues date back in 2012, and consist of two bugs. The first relates to how raw data from phone companies is converted into evidence by Danish police, and the second is a bug that could result in cellphones being linked to the wrong cellphone towers.”