NIKKEI Asia: Myanmar junta targets 100 celebrities active on social media

NIKKEI Asia: Myanmar junta targets 100 celebrities active on social media. “Myanmar’s junta has placed at least 100 celebrities on its wanted list for allegedly inciting protests against its seizure of power, taking aim at those with big social media followings. Since Friday, the nightly news on state television has named 20 prominent figures accused of violating the law. The list is later reprinted the next day in a government-controlled newspaper. The list swelled to 100 on Tuesday night.”

Money laundering is a real issue in tech: Here’s what is being done to stop it (TechRepublic)

TechRepublic: Money laundering is a real issue in tech: Here’s what is being done to stop it. “Money laundering and technology go hand in hand, sadly, and I discussed the topic with industry experts Gudmundur Kristjansson, founder and CEO at Lucinity, an artificial intelligence-based anti-money-laundering solutions provider, and and Zac Cohen, COO at Trulioo, an online identity verification service.”

Free Law Project: Incorporate magistrate judges from 1990 to 2021

From the Free Law Project on GitHub: Incorporate magistrate judges from 1990 to 2021. From the resource page: “Every so often we ask the AO for stuff we can’t really get ourselves. In July of last year, we asked for a list of all magistrate judges, past and present. We already get regular updates from the FJC, but our hope was to get the historical data too. After many months of waiting, and to their immense credit, the AO did eventually deliver today. Attached please find roughly 1,000 magistrate judges that worked in the federal judiciary between 1990 and today.” I’m pretty sure that “the AO” in this case stands for the Administrative Office of the United States Courts.

News Tribune: Missouri Supreme Court launches bicentennial website celebrating courts

News Tribune: Missouri Supreme Court launches bicentennial website celebrating courts. “The new website, which features interactive timelines, offers users a chance to explore the early days of Missouri’s courts, discover how the courts expanded to address the state’s increased case volume, learn about additional changes in the 20th century and explore how Missouri’s courts reorganized to better serve citizens. Its final timeline on the judiciary’s much more recent history examines how embracing new technologies are helping the courts improve their service.”

FOIA for beginners: A state law guarantees access to public records. But it isn’t always that easy. (Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Tribune: FOIA for beginners: A state law guarantees access to public records. But it isn’t always that easy.. “At its core, the Freedom of Information Act is about the government being transparent and accountable to the people it’s meant to serve. Illinois’ FOIA law states ‘all persons are entitled to full and complete information regarding the affairs of government.’ Enacted in 1984 and updated with changes that took effect in 2010, the statute lays out a pretty straightforward process for citizens to obtain public records. A request doesn’t need to read like a document crafted by a law firm — it just needs to be put in writing and delivered via email, by mail or in person.”

CNBC: Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor in copyright dispute with Oracle over Android software

CNBC: Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor in copyright dispute with Oracle over Android software. “The Supreme Court on Monday sided with Google against Oracle in a long-running copyright dispute over the software used in Android, the mobile operating system. The court’s decision was 6-2. Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who was not yet confirmed by the Senate when the case was argued in October, did not participate in the case.”

Bloomberg: Singapore Blogger Crowdfunds $100,000 to Pay PM Defamation Award

Bloomberg: Singapore Blogger Crowdfunds $100,000 to Pay PM Defamation Award. “Singapore’s High Court on March 24 ordered [Leong Sze Hian] to pay S$133,000 ($98,800) to [Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong] for posting a link to a Malaysian news site that alleged the city-state’s leader had helped launder 1Malaysia Development Berhad funds. Since then more than 2,000 people donated to a crowdfunding campaign on social media to raise the full amount, Lim Tean, Leong’s attorney, posted to Facebook on Monday.”

Moscow Times: Russians Post More Profanities After Social Media Swearing Ban

Moscow Times: Russians Post More Profanities After Social Media Swearing Ban. “Russian-speaking social media users have posted 10% more profanity-laced content in the two months since a law requiring platforms to delete them came into force than before, the RBC news website reported Sunday. The Medialogia media monitor tallied 20.2 million posts containing swear words on Facebook, TikTok, YouTube, Instagram and Twitter, as well as three Russian platforms, from Feb. 1-March 31.”

Motherboard: People’s Expensive NFTs Keep Vanishing. This Is Why

Motherboard: People’s Expensive NFTs Keep Vanishing. This Is Why. “Last month, Tom Kuennen, a property manager from Ontario, coughed up $500 worth of cryptocurrency for a JPEG of an Elon Musk-themed ‘Moon Ticket’ from DarpaLabs, an anonymous digital art collective. He purchased it through the marketplace OpenSea, one of the largest vendors of so-called non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, in the hopes of reselling it for a profit. ‘It’s like a casino,’ he said in an interview. ‘If it goes up 100 times you resell it, if it doesn’t, well, you don’t tell anyone.’ He never got the chance to find out.”

SCOTUS Blog: Court says Facebook did not violate anti-spam law when it sent unwanted text messages

SCOTUS Blog: Court says Facebook did not violate anti-spam law when it sent unwanted text messages. “Facebook did not violate a federal telemarketing law when it sent unsolicited text messages to people without their consent, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled on Thursday. In an opinion by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, the court sided with Facebook’s interpretation of a key clause in the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, which restricts the use of devices known as ‘automatic telephone dialing systems.’”

Quartz: With a Google spreadsheet, a web sleuth tracks the comments that get people jailed in China

New-to-me, from Quartz: With a Google spreadsheet, a web sleuth tracks the comments that get people jailed in China. “…since October 2019, a young web sleuth surnamed Wang has been creating a database of cases in which people were punished for online or offline comments critical of the central government. Based on media reports and court records, Wang has documented nearly 2,000 speech crimes in a public Google spreadsheet, arguably one of the few comprehensive records of these ‘crimes’ in China. Censorship makes finding information on such cases a challenge, and the risks associated with creating a database like Wang’s are a deterrent for most.”

SCOTUS Blog: Justices return to standing after Spokeo

SCOTUS Blog: Justices return to standing after Spokeo. “Nearly five years ago, the Supreme Court decided Spokeo v. Robins, the case of a Virginia man who alleged that an internet database company violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act when it published inaccurate information about him. The justices ruled that to have standing – that is, a legal right to sue – it is not enough to simply allege that a statute has been violated. Instead, a plaintiff must show an injury that is both concrete and particularized, even if it is not necessarily a tangible one. On Tuesday in TransUnion v. Ramirez, the justices will consider how these requirements apply to class actions.”

ABC News: Virginia lawmakers ban police use of facial recognition

ABC News: Virginia lawmakers ban police use of facial recognition. “Last month, Virginia lawmakers quietly passed one of the most restrictive bans in the country on the use of facial recognition technology. The legislation, which won unusually broad bipartisan support, prohibits all local law enforcement agencies and campus police departments from purchasing or using facial recognition technology unless it is expressly authorized by the state legislature.”