Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions

Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions. “What if you could pay a fine for a traffic offense with a post online? In southwestern China, traffic violators get off the hook over a minor offense if they admit to their blunder on social media—and earn at least 20 likes, reports Beijing News.”

Tubefilter: Barcelona-Based YouTuber Faces Prison For Pranking Homeless Man With Doctored Oreos

Tubefilter: Barcelona-Based YouTuber Faces Prison For Pranking Homeless Man With Doctored Oreos. “If you thought YouTube pranks had already revealed the lowest levels of human decency, prepare to be stunned: a Barcelona-based YouTuber named Kanghua Ren is in serious trouble with the law after carrying out a prank in which he filled Oreo cookies with toothpaste and fed them to an unsuspecting homeless man on camera.”

Campaign Finance Institute: Introducing CFI’s Groundbreaking Database Of State Campaign Finance Laws

Campaign Finance Institute: Introducing CFI’s Groundbreaking Database Of State Campaign Finance Laws. “The Campaign Finance Institute is pleased to release a groundbreaking new tool, ‘CFI’s Historical Database of State Campaign Finance Laws’. The database covers all of the states’ campaign finance laws every two years since 1996. It is designed for everything from interactive and visualized lookups to downloadable datasets. “

JD Supra: Pennsylvania Superior Court Adopts New Standard for Social Media Evidence

JD Supra: Pennsylvania Superior Court Adopts New Standard for Social Media Evidence. “In Commonwealth v. Mangel, 2018 WL 1322179 (March 15, 2018), the Pennsylvania Superior Court adopted a standard for authenticating social media posts under Pennsylvania Rule of Evidence 901. The Court held that ‘the proponent of social media evidence must present direct or circumstantial evidence that tends to corroborate the identity of the author of the communication in question, such as testimony from the person who sent or received the communication, or contextual clues in the communication tending to reveal the identity of the sender.'”

Mashable: Civil servant fired for criticising government on Twitter wins case

Mashable: Civil servant fired for criticising government on Twitter wins case. “Civil servants in Australia can criticise the country’s government on Twitter, so long as they do it under a fake name and outside of work. That’s the latest result in the case of a former employee of Australia’s immigration department, Michaela Banerji, who was sacked for misconduct in 2013 after posting anonymous tweets that were highly critical of her department and the government’s refugee policy.”

The Guardian: Facebook and Cambridge Analytica face class action lawsuit

The Guardian: Facebook and Cambridge Analytica face class action lawsuit. “British and US lawyers have launched a joint class action against Facebook, Cambridge Analytica and two other companies for allegedly misusing the personal data of more than 71 million people. The lawsuit claims the firms obtained users’ private information from the social media network to develop ‘political propaganda campaigns’ in the UK and the US.”

Tubefilter: YouTube’s Restrictions On Firearms Content Has Led A Gun Manufacturer To Sue A Creator

Tubefilter: YouTube’s Restrictions On Firearms Content Has Led A Gun Manufacturer To Sue A Creator. “YouTube’s decision to tighten its restrictions on firearms videos continues to produce a significant ripple effect. Oregon-based gun manufacturer Radian Weapons is suing the owner of the GY6 YouTube channel, alleging that he didn’t deliver the promised results of a sponsored content deal in part because the video ran afoul of YouTube’s guidelines for advertiser-friendly content.”