Techdirt: FBI Serves Incredibly Broad Warrant To 8chan, Demanding Info On All Users Who Responded To A Shooter’s Post

Techdirt: FBI Serves Incredibly Broad Warrant To 8chan, Demanding Info On All Users Who Responded To A Shooter’s Post. “In this case, an investigation into a shooting at a California mosque has led the FBI to the pages of 8chan. Postings at the site — along with some at Facebook — have linked the shooter to the Christchurch shooting in New Zealand. According to the affidavit [PDF], the FBI believes the California mosque shooter was ‘inspired and/or educated’ by the New Zealand’s shooters manifesto and actions.”

ABA Journal: New tool by Harvard Law lets people explore language usage in caselaw

ABA Journal: New tool by Harvard Law lets people explore language usage in caselaw. “Parsing 6.7 million federal and state cases and 12 billion words, a new tool allows the public to explore the use of language over 360 years of caselaw. Released Wednesday, ‘Historical Trends’ was built by the Harvard Law School Library Innovation Lab and is free to use.”

Techdirt: Supreme Court Signals Loud And Clear That Social Media Sites Are Not Public Forums That Have To Allow All Speech

Techdirt: Supreme Court Signals Loud And Clear That Social Media Sites Are Not Public Forums That Have To Allow All Speech. “Last fall I wrote about the Supreme Court agreeing to hear a case that some argued would allow the Supreme Court to declare that social media sites were public forums thereby limiting their ability to block or ban certain users.”

CNET: Man who shared New Zealand mosque shooting video gets 21-month sentence

CNET: Man who shared New Zealand mosque shooting video gets 21-month sentence. “A man who shared a video of the deadly New Zealand mosque shooting received a 21-month prison sentence on Tuesday. Philip Arps pleaded guilty to two counts of distributing the video of the March 15 attacks, which were livestreamed by the shooter as he killed 51 people.”

The Next Web: AIs should be legally liable for their mistakes soon

The Next Web: AIs should be legally liable for their mistakes soon. “Historically, insurers have had to consider only the human aspect of parties involved in any insurable matter. Today, things are a lot more complex. As AI development has increased in scope, we have been left with programs with the sophistication to be integrated into areas of infrastructure that have effectively given them direct input into life-or-death situations.”

Ubergizmo: WhatsApp Warns Of Legal Action Against Abusers Of Its Platform

Ubergizmo: WhatsApp Warns Of Legal Action Against Abusers Of Its Platform. “Facebook-owned WhatsApp is the most popular cross-platform messaging service in the world. Operating at that scale presents its own set of challenges. The company has had to take several steps to ensure that its platform isn’t abused and not used for the spread of misinformation. WhatsApp is now threatening legal action against even those who merely claim that they have the ability to abuse its platform as many companies have emerged who claim to be able to do just that.”

Techdirt: Historical Documentation Of Key Section 230 Cases

Techdirt: Historical Documentation Of Key Section 230 Cases. “We’ve been talking a lot lately about the fact that people seem incredibly confused (i.e., mostly wrong) about the history, purpose, and even language of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. No matter how many times we try to correct the record, it seems that more people keep getting it wrong. We’ve talked a few times about Jeff Kosseff’s excellent new book called The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet, and, as Kosseff explains, part of his reason for putting together that book is that some of the early history around CDA 230 was at risk of disappearing. And now Kosseff has teamed up with professor Eric Goldman to create an archive of documents related to key Section 230 cases.”