The Guardian: Google fined record €2.4bn by EU over search engine results

The Guardian: Google fined record €2.4bn by EU over search engine results. “Google has been handed a record-breaking fine €2.42bn fine by the European Union for abusing its dominance of the search engine market in building its online shopping service. European regulators gave the tech giant 90 days to stop its illegal activities or face fines of up to 5% of the average daily worldwide turnover of parent company Alphabet.”

Boing Boing: US Copyright Office recommends sweeping, welcome changes to America’s DRM laws

Boing Boing: US Copyright Office recommends sweeping, welcome changes to America’s DRM laws. “A new report from the US Copyright Office on Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act — a controversial law that bans breaking DRM, even for legitimate purposes — calls for sweeping, welcome changes to the DMCA.”

Nature: US court grants Elsevier millions in damages from Sci-Hub

Nature: US court grants Elsevier millions in damages from Sci-Hub. “One of the world’s largest science publishers, Elsevier, won a default legal judgement on 21 June against websites that provide illicit access to tens of millions of research papers and books. A New York district court awarded Elsevier US$15 million in damages for copyright infringement by Sci-Hub, the Library of Genesis (LibGen) project and related sites.”

Increasing transparency of abortion laws and policies: launch of a new online database (WHO)

World Health Organization: Increasing transparency of abortion laws and policies: launch of a new online database. “WHO and the Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs have launched a new, open-access database of laws, policies and health standards on abortion in countries worldwide. The database aims to promote greater transparency of abortion laws and policies, as well as to improve countries’ accountability for the protection of women and girls’ health and human rights.”

Stuff NZ: Fairfax NZ photo library set to return home after US wrangle

Stuff NZ: Fairfax NZ photo library set to return home after US wrangle. “Fairfax NZ’s photo collection looks set to return to New Zealand from the United States, ending a long-running legal saga. Fairfax, the publisher of Stuff and newspapers including The Sunday Star-Times, The Dominion Post and The Press, agreed in 2013 to transfer several million photographs that had been taken in Australia and New Zealand over more than 100 years to Rogers Photo Archive (RPA). The company was to digitise and archive them all for free in return for some sales rights. “

Reuters: Google to push for law enforcement to have more access to overseas data

Reuters: Google to push for law enforcement to have more access to overseas data . “Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O: Quote) Google will press U.S. lawmakers on Thursday to update laws on how governments access customer data stored on servers located in other countries, hoping to address a mounting concern for both law enforcement officials and Silicon Valley.”

Library of Congress: International Tribunals Web Archive Launched

Library of Congress: International Tribunals Web Archive Launched. “In order to organize and manage digital content available on international courts and tribunals, the Library of Congress Web Archiving Team and the Law Library of Congress recently launched an ‘International Tribunals Archive'(ITA). The ITA is an archive with the purpose of digitally storing relevant websites hosting information about the most important international tribunals created since World War II for researchers today and in the future.”