Toronto Star: Google wants court to decide whether search curbs would infringe charter rights

Toronto Star: Google wants court to decide whether search curbs would infringe charter rights. “Google wants the Federal Court to decide whether limiting search-engine results in the name of privacy would infringe Canadians’ constitutional guarantee of free expression. The leading internet search engine advocates broadening an upcoming court hearing to squarely address the question.”

TechCrunch: Transparency-seeking OPEN Government Data Act signed into law

TechCrunch: Transparency-seeking OPEN Government Data Act signed into law . “The federal government produces one hell of a lot of data, but despite desultory lurches toward usability, there’s little guarantee that it’s available in a way that makes it useful to anyone. That may change for the better with the OPEN Government Data Act, which the president signed into law last night. The act essentially requires federal agencies to default when possible to making data (and metadata) public, to publish that public data in a machine-readable format and catalog it online. It also mandates that chief data officers be appointed at those agencies to handle the process.”

The Jerusalem Post: Opening The National Library’s Digital Doors

The Jerusalem Post: Opening The National Library’s Digital Doors. “A caricature of a balloon-headed prime minister Menachem Begin looks out from the cover of a pamphlet published ahead of the 1981 national election. ‘Begin… and the rest of the Likud’s jokes,’ it reads. The little green booklet is one of the millions of items and artifacts held by the National Library of Israel in its extensive archives. But until now, it was one of many items that the library did not earmark for digitization, because it is known as ‘orphan work,’ whose copyright holders cannot be located. Now, following an amendment to the Copyright Law passed in the Knesset on January 1, the library and other cultural institutions in Israel will have much greater freedom to digitize and share their vast holdings without the fear of lawsuits.”

‘This is wrong’: Iowa’s flawed felon list is disqualifying legitimate voters for year (Des Moines Register)

Des Moines Register: EXCLUSIVE: ‘This is wrong’: Iowa’s flawed felon list is disqualifying legitimate voters for years. “Jessica Bensley can legally carry a pistol in public — in part because she has never been convicted of a felony. But last year, Bensley somehow ended up on Iowa’s felon list. Because Iowa law doesn’t allow felons to vote, the Polk County Auditor’s Office, in turn, rejected the ballot she cast in November. Iowa’s mistake cost Bensley her constitutional right to vote. And she wasn’t the only one.”

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Do social media bots have a right to free speech?

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Do social media bots have a right to free speech?. “While the Kremlin agents who interfered in the US election likely wouldn’t be beholden to a state-level law in the United States, or deterred by it, domestic political campaigns and businesses might. For at least one constitutional scholar, that possibility raises this question: Do bots, like citizens, have that most sacred right enshrined in the First Amendment to the US Constitution, the right to free speech? Laurent Sacharoff, a law professor at the University of Arkansas, thinks the people programming bots may want US courts to answer that in the affirmative.”

Route Fifty: State Laws Slow Down High-Speed Internet for Rural America

Route Fifty: State Laws Slow Down High-Speed Internet for Rural America. “Electric cooperatives want to help bridge the digital divide between rural and urban America as more federal funding becomes available for rural broadband. But a 77-year-old law may prevent one of the nation’s poorest states from fully tapping into millions of new federal dollars to expand high-speed internet service to needy rural communities.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Google board sued for hushing up misconduct claims about ‘father of Android’

Sydney Morning Herald: Google board sued for hushing up misconduct claims about ‘father of Android’. “Alphabet Inc.’s board of directors was sued by a shareholder for ‘quietly’ approving a $US90 million ($125 million) exit payment to the father of Android, Andy Rubin, and protecting other executives accused of sexual harassment.”