Ars Technica: Two senators propose ban on data caps, blasting ISPs for “predatory” limits

Ars Technica: Two senators propose ban on data caps, blasting ISPs for “predatory” limits. “US Senators Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) and Cory Booker (D-N.J.) want to ban Internet data caps. The senators today introduced the ‘Uncap America Act,’ which would ‘prohibit predatory data caps that force families to pay high costs and unnecessary fees to access high-speed broadband,’ they said in a press release.”

WIRED: Russia Is Quietly Ramping Up Its Internet Censorship Machine

WIRED: Russia Is Quietly Ramping Up Its Internet Censorship Machine. “SINCE 2019, VLADIMIR Putin has supercharged his plan to separate Russia from the global internet. The country’s sovereign internet law, which came into force that November, gives officials the power to block access to websites for millions of Russians. The law was used to hit Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter with blocks and followed Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February. Since then, Russian officials have continuously dripped out new policies and measures to further control the internet, boosting the state’s censorship and surveillance powers.”

Ars Technica: South Carolina lawmakers want to banish abortion talk from the Internet

Ars Technica: South Carolina lawmakers want to banish abortion talk from the Internet. “Known as the ‘Equal Protection at Conception—No Exceptions—Act,’ the bill would ban any website from hosting or publishing any information about accessing or self-inducing abortion ‘knowing that the information will be used, or is reasonably likely to be used, for an abortion.’”

Reuters: Limits on personal data gathering by Google, Facebook, others advance in U.S. House

Reuters: Limits on personal data gathering by Google, Facebook, others advance in U.S. House. “A U.S. House of Representatives committee approved on Wednesday a bill to create the first U.S. privacy law limiting personal information collected online by companies like Alphabet’s Google and Meta’s Facebook. The House Energy and Commerce Committee approved the bill by a margin of 53-2. It now goes to the House floor. A companion bill is before the Senate.”

The Guardian: Tech platforms face UK ban on blocking news providers before appeal

The Guardian: Tech platforms face UK ban on blocking news providers before appeal. “A change to the online safety bill means that articles in breach of a service’s terms and conditions cannot be removed or hidden until the publisher has been notified and has received the verdict of any appeal to the platform. The amendment to the legislation is intended to avoid a repeat of an incident last year when YouTube suddenly banned the digital station TalkRadio from its platform for violating its content guidelines. It was reinstated 12 hours later.”

ZDNet: Singapore still working on rules to tighten social media enforcement

ZDNet: Singapore still working on rules to tighten social media enforcement. “Singapore still is mulling over new rules that will, amongst others, instruct social media platforms to disable access to content it deems harmful. It will not, however, bar the use of hyperlinks in SMS or other messaging apps as doing so will not eliminate the risk of someone falling prey to phishing attacks.”

The Verge: Japan to start jailing people for online insults

The Verge: Japan to start jailing people for online insults. “Posting ‘online insults’ will be punishable by up to a year in prison time in Japan starting Thursday, when a new law passed earlier this summer will go into effect. People convicted of online insults can also be fined up to 300,000 yen (just over $2,200). Previously, the punishment was fewer than 30 days in prison and up to 10,000 yen ($75).”

ProPublica: Federal Patient Privacy Law Does Not Cover Most Period-Tracking Apps

ProPublica: Federal Patient Privacy Law Does Not Cover Most Period-Tracking Apps. “Following the Supreme Court’s decision overturning Roe v. Wade, advocates for privacy and reproductive health have expressed fears that data from period-tracking apps could be used to find people who’ve had abortions. They have a point. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, the federal patient privacy law known as HIPAA, does not apply to most apps that track menstrual cycles, just as it doesn’t apply to many health care apps and at-home test kits.”

Eurasianet: Armenia moves to restrict internet

Eurasianet: Armenia moves to restrict internet. “Armenia’s General Prosecutor has proposed a law allowing the state to block certain internet content, citing Russia as a positive example of how such a practice might work. In a July 4 letter addressed to the government, General Prosecutor Artur Davtyan suggested that the country should adopt legal regulations allowing the government to block material on the internet it deems harmful.”