New York Times: Legislative Tracker Sounds Alarm on Anti-Transparency Bills

New York Times: Legislative Tracker Sounds Alarm on Anti-Transparency Bills. “The National Freedom of Information Coalition is launching a bill tracker that aims to find, in real-time, all pieces of legislation that affect government transparency in state legislatures. On its website, the coalition is releasing dashboards of pending or recent legislation in all states for Sunshine Week, an annual celebration of open government that runs from March 15-21.”

The Verge: All The Ways Congress Is Taking On The Tech Industry

The Verge: All The Ways Congress Is Taking On The Tech Industry. “In 2020, lawmakers have lots of ideas about how to regulate tech companies. After the 2016 presidential contest and years of investigations from intelligence experts, Congress woke up to the power Big Tech holds over democracy — whether it’s through collecting data or serving up political ads. For legislators, it feels like time to rein in that power. New bills are introduced every day, creating a sea of regulatory threats that’s difficult to keep straight as time goes on.”

New York Times: Facebook, Google and Twitter Rebel Against Pakistan’s Censorship Rules

New York Times: Facebook, Google and Twitter Rebel Against Pakistan’s Censorship Rules. “When Pakistan’s government unveiled some of the world’s most sweeping rules on internet censorship this month, global internet companies like Facebook, Google and Twitter were expected to comply or face severe penalties — including the potential shutdown of their services. Instead, the tech giants banded together and threatened to leave the country and its 70 million internet users in digital darkness.”

New Online Resource: War Powers and Presidential Practice (Just Security)

Just Security: New Online Resource: War Powers and Presidential Practice. “Today we are excited to announce the release of the War Powers Resolution Reporting Project, a product of the Reiss Center on Law and Security at NYU School of Law. ([Tess] Bridgeman is the project’s lead author and researcher; [Rachel] Goldbrenner is the executive director of the Reiss Center.) Intended for use by policymakers, legislators, scholars, journalists and the general public, the Project is an expansive new resource that analyzes the war powers reporting practice of every president in the 45 years since the WPR was enacted. It sheds light on how presidents use U.S. armed forces abroad and relationships between the president and Congress on matters of war and peace.”

University of Washington: New, UW-developed data tool tracks state legislative process, from first draft to final law

University of Washington: New, UW-developed data tool tracks state legislative process, from first draft to final law. “Legislators introduce thousands of bills during each session of the Washington State Legislature. But tracking how a bill becomes a law, or what happens to the vast majority that never make it that far, isn’t easy with current technology. A new data visualization tool aims to address this need. Legislative Explorer, or LegEx, developed by University of Washington political science professor John Wilkerson and undergraduate Rohnin Randles, in partnership with Seattle-based Schema Design, draws on bill information made available by the state to enable students, journalists and voters to visually explore the lawmaking process.”

New York Times: Germany to Require Social Media Sites to Report Hate Speech

New York Times: Germany to Require Social Media Sites to Report Hate Speech. “According to the bill passed by ministers Wednesday, internet companies will have to flag far-right propaganda, graphic portrayals of violence, murder or rape threats, posts indicating that someone is preparing a terrorist attack or distributing child sexual abuse images.”

Highland County Press: Husted launches AI tool to analyze Ohio regulations

Highland County Press: Husted launches AI tool to analyze Ohio regulations. Ohio’s Lt. Governor Jon Husted. “The project launched Thursday, procured with the assistance of InnovateOhio, uses text analytics and artificial intelligence to analyze Ohio’s rules. By comparing and linking data sets— a task that could take humans months or years — it will provide government policymakers with opportunities to streamline regulations. The tool will more quickly sort data from the Ohio Revised Code (ORC) and Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) in order to narrow the work that needs to be done by human analysts.”