Recode: The leading lobbying group for Amazon, Facebook, Google and other tech giants is joining the legal battle to restore net neutrality

Recode: The leading lobbying group for Amazon, Facebook, Google and other tech giants is joining the legal battle to restore net neutrality. “A leading lobbying group for Amazon, Facebook, Google, Netflix, Twitter and other tech giants said Friday that it would be joining the coming legal crusade to restore the U.S. government’s net neutrality rules. The Washington, D.C.-based Internet Association specifically plans to join a lawsuit as an intervening party, aiding the challenge to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s vote in December to repeal regulations that required internet providers like AT&T and Comcast* to treat all web traffic equally, its leader confirmed to Recode.”

WVLT: Vermont law bans employers from reviewing social media accounts of workers

WVLT: Vermont law bans employers from reviewing social media accounts of workers. “A new law in Vermont that went into effect on New Year’s Day bans employers from asking for the social media passwords of workers. Employers will also not be able to review private accounts at all, WCAX reports. Champlain College Professor Elaine Young has been studying social media use for years. She says employers checking accounts isn’t unusual.”

Richmond Times-Dispatch: Virginia to broadcast and archive General Assembly committee hearings for the first time

Richmond Times-Dispatch: Virginia to broadcast and archive General Assembly committee hearings for the first time. “The commonwealth is making a significant move this year to live stream and archive committee hearings of the General Assembly, something open government advocates have been pushing for years….The live broadcasts and online archive will allow the public, lobbyists and anyone with an interest in committee hearings to watch from their home or office, and go back and review hearings indefinitely.”

Reuters: Macron plans law to fight ‘fake news’ in 2018

Reuters: Macron plans law to fight ‘fake news’ in 2018. “President Emmanuel Macron announced on Wednesday he would overhaul French media legislation this year to fight the spread of ‘fake news’ on social media which he said was a threat to liberal democracies.”

Associated Press: Efforts grow to help students evaluate what they see online

Associated Press: Efforts grow to help students evaluate what they see online. “Alarmed by the proliferation of false content online, state lawmakers around the country are pushing schools to put more emphasis on teaching students how to tell fact from fiction. Lawmakers in several states have introduced or passed bills calling on public school systems to do more to teach media literacy skills that they say are critical to democracy. The effort has been bipartisan but has received little attention despite successful legislation in Washington state, Connecticut, Rhode Island and New Mexico. Several more states are expected to consider such bills in the coming year, including Arizona, New York and Hawaii.”

BBC News: Germany starts enforcing hate speech law

BBC News: Germany starts enforcing hate speech law. “Germany is set to start enforcing a law that demands social media sites move quickly to remove hate speech, fake news and illegal material. Sites that do not remove ‘obviously illegal’ posts could face fines of up to 50m euro (£44.3m). The law gives the networks 24 hours to act after they have been told about law-breaking material.”

Techdirt: New York State Eyes Its Own Net Neutrality Law

Techdirt: New York State Eyes Its Own Net Neutrality Law. ” In ISP lobbying land, stopping states from writing protectionist law is an assault on ‘states rights,’ but when states actually try to help consumers you’ll note the concern for states rights magically disappears. Regardless, New York State, California and Washington have all indicated that they will attempt to test the FCC’s state preemption authority on this front in the new year by crafting their own net neutrality legislation. You’ll recall that the FCC already had its wrist slapped by the courts for over-reach when it tried to preempt states from passing anti-community broadband laws, quite literally written by large ISPs, intended to hamstring creative solutions (including public/private partnerships) for the telecom industry’s broadband competition logjam.”