Techdirt: Historical Documentation Of Key Section 230 Cases

Techdirt: Historical Documentation Of Key Section 230 Cases. “We’ve been talking a lot lately about the fact that people seem incredibly confused (i.e., mostly wrong) about the history, purpose, and even language of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. No matter how many times we try to correct the record, it seems that more people keep getting it wrong. We’ve talked a few times about Jeff Kosseff’s excellent new book called The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet, and, as Kosseff explains, part of his reason for putting together that book is that some of the early history around CDA 230 was at risk of disappearing. And now Kosseff has teamed up with professor Eric Goldman to create an archive of documents related to key Section 230 cases.”

Get All of Your Bots in a Row: 2018 California Bot Disclosure Law Comes Online Soon (National Law Review)

National Law Review: Get All of Your Bots in a Row: 2018 California Bot Disclosure Law Comes Online Soon. “During the 2016 election, certain Russian operatives used fake social media profiles to influence voters and also created bot accounts to add likes to and share posts across the internet. And more recently, in January 2019, the New York Attorney General and Office of the Florida Attorney General announced settlements with certain entities that sold fake social media engagement, such as followers, likes and views. Moreover, many of the social media platforms have had recent purges of millions of fake accounts. Thus, it’s clear that bots and automated activity on social media platforms has been on everyone’s radar…including state legislators’ too.”

TechSpot: Maine passes bill prohibiting ISPs from selling customer data without consent

TechSpot: Maine passes bill prohibiting ISPs from selling customer data without consent. “The state’s Senate voted unanimously to pass the bill, after the bill found similar favor in the state House. The bill, LD 946, requires ISPs to obtain consent before collecting, disclosing, selling or permitting access to customer information. LD 946 outlines exceptions where ISPs can use customer information without consent, such as honoring a court order or in case of emergency services.”

TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech

TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech. “On Tuesday, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors voted to approve a ban on the use of facial recognition tech by city agencies, including the police department. The Stop Secret Surveillance Ordinance, introduced by San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin, is the first ban of its kind for a major American city and the seventh major surveillance oversight effort for a municipality in California.”

Congressman Bruce Westerman: Westerman, Kind Introduce Bipartisan Bill Creating Federal Lands Database

Congressman Bruce Westerman: Westerman, Kind Introduce Bipartisan Bill Creating Federal Lands Database. “Today, U.S. Reps. Bruce Westerman (R-Ark.) and Ron Kind (D-Wis.) introduced the Federal Land Asset Inventory Reform (FLAIR) Act, a bipartisan, bicameral bill to create a single database for lands owned by the federal government.”

BetaNews: Putin signs law to create ‘sovereign internet’ for Russia

BetaNews: Putin signs law to create ‘sovereign internet’ for Russia. “President Putin has signed into law a bill that will give Russia a ‘sovereign internet’ — one which could be disconnected from the global web if the Kremlin decided to do so. It is being sold as a way to ‘ensure the safe and sustainable functioning’ of Russia’s internet should the country’s enemies try to block access.”

Nieman Lab: What the EU’s copyright overhaul means — and what might change for big tech

Nieman Lab: What the EU’s copyright overhaul means — and what might change for big tech. “Last week, the Council of the European Union — the EU body that represents the executive governments of its member states — signed off on the new EU Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market — the first significant update to EU copyright rules in almost two decades. That was the last Europe-level hurdle for a process that lasted nearly three years.”