New York Times: How to Force 8Chan, Reddit and Others to Clean Up

New York Times: How to Force 8Chan, Reddit and Others to Clean Up. “Though it may seem that there is little that platforms and politicians can do to stop the spread of online hatred, a great deal could be accomplished with one simple tweak to the existing Communications Decency Act: revise the safe harbor provisions of the law.”

New York Times: Legal Shield for Websites Rattles Under Onslaught of Hate Speech

New York Times: Legal Shield for Websites Rattles Under Onslaught of Hate Speech. “When the most consequential law governing speech on the internet was created in 1996, Google.com didn’t exist and Mark Zuckerberg was 11 years old. The federal law, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, has helped Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and countless other internet companies flourish.”

Marketplace: To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states

Marketplace: To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states. “Over 30% of Americans don’t have access to broadband internet — defined as 25 megabits per second or higher — according to research released Tuesday by The NPD Group. The Pew Charitable Trusts wants to figure out why. The organization’s Broadband Research Initiative is launching a new tool Wednesday that lets anyone browse through broadband policies and funding in any state in the U.S.”

UNAIDS: Mapping HIV laws and policies

UNAIDS: Mapping HIV laws and policies. “A new website that enables people to identify national laws and policies related to the AIDS response has been launched by UNAIDS. Covering areas as diverse as a country’s ability to diagnose HIV among young babies, the existence of laws that discriminate against transgender people and whether people are prosecuted for carrying condoms, the Laws and Policies Analytics website aims to give a full overview of a country’s laws and policies related to the HIV response. It also allows to view policy data jointly with other data on the HIV epidemic and response.”

Ars Technica: Proposed US law would ban infinite scroll, autoplaying video

Ars Technica: Proposed US law would ban infinite scroll, autoplaying video. “Nobody likes auto-playing video or sites that keep scrolling away infinitely when you’re just trying to reach the bottom of the page. But you probably don’t hate either ‘feature’ as much as Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), who introduced a bill today to ban these and other “exploitative” practices.”

Curbed New York: City to create database to track scourge of retail vacancies

Curbed New York: City to create database to track scourge of retail vacancies. “The ‘Storefront Tracker’ bill, which was backed by 16 councilmembers, requires the Department of Finance gather an array of data on storefronts that will be bundled into a digital tool intended as a crucial resource to better understand the woes of the small business sector.”