Washington Post: As coronavirus surges, GOP lawmakers are moving to limit public health powers

Washington Post: As coronavirus surges, GOP lawmakers are moving to limit public health powers . “In some states, anger at perceived overreach by health officials has prompted legislative attempts to limit their authority, including new state laws that prevent the closure of businesses or allow lawmakers to rescind mask mandates. Some state courts have reined in the emergency and regulatory powers governors have wielded against the virus. And in its recent rulings and analysis, the U.S. Supreme Court has signaled its willingness to limit disease mitigation in the name of religious freedom.”

Rebuild Local News: Rebuild Local News coalition backs Senate bill to preserve community journalism

Rebuild Local News: Rebuild Local News coalition backs Senate bill to preserve community journalism. “The bill — jointly introduced by the chair of the Senate Commerce Committee, Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA), Sen. Ron. Wyden (D-OR), the chair of the Senate Finance Committee, and Sen. Mark Kelly (D-AZ) — seeks to provide a pathway to financial viability for local news in newspapers, in digital only publications, and on television and radio stations through a series of tax credits. The legislation mirrors a similar bill introduced in the House by Reps. Ann Kirkpatrick (D-AZ) and Dan Newhouse (R-WA), which has strong bipartisan support.”

WQP: Test Your Well Water Act Introduced

WQP: Test Your Well Water Act Introduced. “The Test Your Well Water Act was introduced July 20 by Rep. Mike Gallagher, Reps. Dan Kildee, Antonio Delgado, Elissa Slotkin, and Ron Kind. According to Congressman Mike Gallagher’s website, the bipartisan legislation would create an online tool on the U.S. EPA’s website for Americans with a private well to find resources to test their drinking water and understand the results. The tool aims to promote transparency and modernize access to EPA resources in an effort to educate Americans about their drinking water.”

Digiday: How a new tool that crowdsources California privacy law violation allegations creates gray areas for businesses

Digiday: How a new tool that crowdsources California privacy law violation allegations creates gray areas for businesses. “California Attorney General Rob Bonta has been sending companies so-called ‘notice-to-cure’ letters when they are found by his office to be out of compliance with the state’s California Consumer Privacy Act. Now his Department of Justice is crowdsourcing Californians to do the same using a new tool allowing them to create letters to send to companies via email or snail mail notifying them that they may be in violation of the law if they don’t include a homepage link for people to opt out from data collection.”

Legal Services Corporation: New Eviction Laws Database Reveals Striking Differences in Eviction Processes Around the Country

Legal Services Corporation: New Eviction Laws Database Reveals Striking Differences in Eviction Processes Around the Country. “The Legal Services Corporation (LSC) launched the LSC Eviction Laws Database today, a new online tool that will aid users in better understanding the significant variation in eviction laws across the country and the effect these differences have on eviction outcomes. LSC produced the database in partnership with the Center for Public Health Law Research at Temple University’s Beasley School of Law. Users can examine the entire eviction legal process, from pre-filing to post-judgment, in different communities around the country.”

KCBX: Social media platforms must get direct parental consent for minors under new California law

KCBX: Social media platforms must get direct parental consent for minors under new California law. “For kids in California, it won’t be as easy as clicking and agreeing to the terms and conditions to open an account on social media platforms. Soon, they will have to get direct parental permission, after Central Coast Assemblymember Jordan Cunningham’s bill AB891 was signed into law recently by Governor Gavin Newsom.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Adds ‘A Century of Lawmaking’ to Congress. gov

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Adds ‘A Century of Lawmaking’ to Congress. gov. “The Library of Congress announced today that U.S. congressional records dating back to the days of printing presses and the telegraph are now easily accessible on mobile devices. With this latest update of Congress.gov — the official website for U.S. federal legislative information — the Library has transitioned over 33,000 bills and resolutions crafted by Congress between 1799 and 1873 (the 6th to 42nd U.S. Congresses) to a modern, user-friendly web format.”

State of Connecticut: Governor Lamont Launches Website Providing Updated Information on the Legalization of Cannabis in Connecticut

State of Connecticut: Governor Lamont Launches Website Providing Updated Information on the Legalization of Cannabis in Connecticut. “Although the portion of the law permitting adults to possess and consume cannabis went into effect on July 1, there are several components that do not go into effect for another one to two years, most notably the establishment of retail sales, which are expected to begin toward the end of 2022 and will have a very specific licensing process and social equity requirement. The governor explained that this website is intended as a resource to provide Connecticut residents with the most up-to-date information about this ongoing process.”

Wall Street Journal: Facebook, Twitter, Google Threaten to Quit Hong Kong Over Proposed Data Laws

Wall Street Journal: Facebook, Twitter, Google Threaten to Quit Hong Kong Over Proposed Data Laws. “Facebook Inc., Twitter Inc., and Alphabet Inc.’s Google have privately warned the Hong Kong government that they could stop offering their services in the city if authorities proceed with planned changes to data-protection laws that could make them liable for the malicious sharing of individuals’ information online.”

Nieman Lab: Punitive laws are failing to curb misinformation in Africa

Nieman Lab: Punitive laws are failing to curb misinformation in Africa. “In a recent study, we examined the changes made to laws and regulations relating to the publication of ‘false information’ in 11 sub-Saharan countries between 2016 and 2020. We also looked at how they correlate with misinformation, to understand the role they may play in reducing harm caused by misinformation.”

The Cybersecurity 202: Activists and lawmakers increase calls for ban on federal use of facial recognition technology (Washington Post)

Washington Post: The Cybersecurity 202: Activists and lawmakers increase calls for ban on federal use of facial recognition technology. “A new report by the Government Accountability Office, the federal government’s main watchdog, makes it all the more necessary that the technology be banned at the federal level, they argue. At least 20 U.S. government agencies have deployed facial recognition technology since 2015, with many not knowing which systems they’re using, the nonpartisan watchdog found. The watchdog recommended that many of the agencies better track the systems and assess their risks.”

CNN: House Judiciary advances sweeping legislation to rein in and break up Big Tech

CNN: House Judiciary advances sweeping legislation to rein in and break up Big Tech. “A powerful House panel on Thursday approved a sweeping set of proposals aimed at weakening Big Tech. It passed a series of measures imposing new obligations on top digital platforms, prohibiting them from abusing any gatekeeper power, and in some cases opening the door to new fines and breakups.”