The Guardian: What was Dracula really like? 550-year-old clue to life of Vlad the Impaler emerges

The Guardian: What was Dracula really like? 550-year-old clue to life of Vlad the Impaler emerges. “On a dark and stormy night in May this year, exactly 125 years to the day that Bram Stoker published the definitive vampire novel, two people pored over a document more than 500 years old in a room in Transylvania – signed by Dracula himself. Gleb and Svetlana Zilberstein’s mission? To extract genetic material from the letters written by Vlad Dracula – the historical inspiration for Stoker’s vampiric count – left there by his sweat, fingerprints and saliva.”

News 12 Long Island: Civil War letters written by Islip soldier delivered to Long Island historical society

News 12 Long Island: Civil War letters written by Islip soldier delivered to Long Island historical society. “Over 100 letters providing a firsthand account of life during the Civil War were recently delivered to a historical society on Long Island. The correspondence was written by 41-year-old Frederick Wright Sr., a private in the Union Army, to his family home on Monell Avenue in Islip…. The letters are available for viewing on the Historical Society of Islip Hamlet’s Online Museum website.”

Australian War Memorial: First World War diaries and letters get new life online

Australian War Memorial: First World War diaries and letters get new life online. “Eyewitness accounts of the end of the First World War, as recorded in diaries and letters, are now available online as part of a major digitisation project led by the Australian War Memorial. These diaries and letters give an intimate insight to this globally significant day, as Australians gather to mark Remembrance Day and commemorate the Armistice of the First World War, which was signed at 11 am on 11 November 1918.”

Jewish Telegraphic Agency: What I learned about antisemitism from a remarkable new archive about Jewish Civil War soldiers

Jewish Telegraphic Agency: What I learned about antisemitism from a remarkable new archive about Jewish Civil War soldiers . “[Max] Glass was not the only Jewish soldier to be cruelly mistreated when serving in the Union Army. But as the new Shapell Roster of Jewish Service in the Civil War demonstrates, his experience was far from typical. I explored the Shapell Roster while working on my new book, on the experience of Jewish soldiers in the Union army. What I learned from the vast collection of documents and data was that indifference, benign curiosity and comradeship appear to have been much more common than conflict for the majority of Jewish soldiers in the Union army.”

Yorkshire Post: Wentworth Woodhouse’s ‘lost’ archives that were thought to have been destroyed in a fire reveal fascinating facts about Yorkshire estate

Yorkshire Post: Wentworth Woodhouse’s ‘lost’ archives that were thought to have been destroyed in a fire reveal fascinating facts about Yorkshire estate. “The story goes that a huge bonfire at Wentworth Woodhouse in the 1970s destroyed a vast collection of private letters and documents belonging to the aristocratic Fitzwilliam family. Yet this urban legend that sprang up in the estate villages as the family’s fortunes crumbled and the Grade I-listed house near Rotherham’s sale approached was never accurate – and a new research project has digitised the Fitzwilliams’ ‘lost’ archives and revealed previously unknown facts about their lives.”

News@Northeastern: Letters Of Ignatius Sancho Offer Window To Life Of Black Man In 18th-century London

News@Northeastern: Letters Of Ignatius Sancho Offer Window To Life Of Black Man In 18th-century London. “Led by Northeastern professors Nicole Aljoe and Olly Ayers along with four undergraduate research assistants, the Ignatius Sancho’s London project pulls data from digital and physical archives of Sancho’s letters and maps them, creating an interactive resource to help the public understand Black life in 18th-century England.”

Fine Books & Collections: Oxford English Dictionary Correspondence Heads Online

Thanks to Tish W for always keeping an eye out and sending me cool stuff. From Fine Books & Collections: Oxford English Dictionary Correspondence Heads Online. “The Murray Scriptorium has been established by Professor of English at the University of Oxford Charlotte Brewer and research fellow Dr. Stephen Turton from the University of Cambridge, both specialists in the history of dictionaries. It aims to document the letters and papers of Sir James Augustus Henry Murray (1837–1915) who was the chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary and sent and received so many letters compiling it that a pillar box was set up outside his house in Oxford.”

Tulane News: Tulane database brings historic activism to the forefront

New-to-Me, from Tulane News: Tulane database brings historic activism to the forefront. “The African Letters Project is a free database that consists of over 5,600 letters written between 1945 to 1994, during the decolonization era in many African countries. [Professor Elisabeth] McMahon’s initial idea for the database was to highlight more African American activists who supported independence movements throughout Africa during that period of history.”

University of Rochester: Slaughter family papers help complete the story of a life in politics

University of Rochester: Slaughter family papers help complete the story of a life in politics. “The letters exchanged between late United States Representative Louise Slaughter and her husband, Bob, are a small portion of the Robert and Louise Slaughter family papers that now reside at the University of Rochester. A gift from the Slaughters’ family, the papers will be held by the Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation (RBSCP), complementing the Louise M. Slaughter congressional papers given to Rochester in 2019.”

Anash: New App To Release Thousands Of The Rebbe’s English Letters

Anash: New App To Release Thousands Of The Rebbe’s English Letters. “On the new state-of-the-art app, users will be able to view over 5,000 letters addressing every topic imaginable. 2,000 of them are being published on the app for the first time. The app is slated to launch in the beginning of next week, bringing this inaccessible part of the Rebbe’s Torah to thousands in time for the Rebbe’s 120th birthday.” This is one of those items that came with a minimum of context and I couldn’t find more extensive information. I’m 99% sure this app covers the letters of Menachem Mendel Schneerson, and if I’m in error I sincerely apologize in advance.

Associated Press: Scientists decipher Marie Antoinette’s redacted love notes

Associated Press: Scientists decipher Marie Antoinette’s redacted love notes. ” ‘Not without you.’ ‘My dear friend.’ ‘You that I love.’ Marie Antoinette sent these expressions of affection — or more? — in letters to her close friend and rumored lover Axel von Fersen. Someone later used dark ink to scribble over the words, apparently to dampen the effusive, perhaps amorous, language. Scientists in France devised a new method to uncover the original writing, separating out the chemical composition of different inks used on historical documents.”

CBS News: 12-year-old writes viral letter asking Florida school board to require masks

CBS News: 12-year-old writes viral letter asking Florida school board to require masks. “A 12-year-old girl is advocating for other children, urging her Florida school district implement masks in schools. Lila Hartley wrote a letter to the Duval County school board and superintendent last week, saying she is vaccinated, but she is concerned about her 10-year-old brother, who is ineligible at his age.”