New York Times: The Slander Industry

New York Times: The Slander Industry. “To get slander removed, many people hire a ‘reputation management’ company. In my case, it was going to cost roughly $20,000. We soon discovered a secret, hidden behind a smokescreen of fake companies and false identities. The people facilitating slander and the self-proclaimed good guys who help remove it are often one and the same.”

South China Morning Post: Singapore opposition politician ordered to pay PM Lee Hsien Loong US$99,000 in defamation case

South China Morning Post: Singapore opposition politician ordered to pay PM Lee Hsien Loong US$99,000 in defamation case. “A Singapore court has ordered an opposition politician to pay Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong S$133,000 (US$99,000) in damages for defamation in one of two recent libel suits launched by the island nation’s premier over online comments about him.”

Poynter: Fact-checkers personally targeted by partisan attacks

Poynter: Fact-checkers personally targeted by partisan attacks. “Darko Brkan was still living in his parents’ house when he read an article that identified him as the owner of several apartment properties, a man who enjoyed a jetsetting, lavish lifestyle of travel and luxury. This was news to Brkan, the founding president of the media NGO Zašto Ne which hosts the fact-checking platform Raskrinkavanje in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In fact, he read this about himself in the conservative newspaper Avaz while in Capetown, South Africa, attending Global Fact 6 — a trip paid for by the International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN), since he couldn’t have afforded to attend otherwise.”

Techstory: Pepsi sues Facebook, Twitter for alleging Kurkure contains plastic

Techstory: Pepsi sues Facebook, Twitter for alleging Kurkure contains plastic . “On Friday, July 20, Twitter user Nikhil Jois received a mail from Twitter notifying that his account information is being submitted to the court for legal process because of his tweet from June 2015 : ‘Also… did you try burning Kurkure? It has pla’ from his handle @nikhiljoisr. Like Jois, hundreds of social media users in India are being notified that their account details is being submitted to the Delhi High Court over an ongoing civil suit in which PepsiCo is suing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and Instagram.” Kurkure is a snack food sold in India by Pepsi. To me it kind of looks like Cheetos.

Gizmodo: When a Stranger Decides to Destroy Your Life

Gizmodo: When a Stranger Decides to Destroy Your Life. “Monika Glennon has lived in Huntsville, Alabama, for the last 12 years. Other than a strong Polish accent, she fits a certain stereotype of the All-American life. She’s blonde. Her husband is a veteran Marine. Her two children, a boy and a girl, joined the military as adults. She sells houses—she’s a real estate agent at Re/Max—helping others realize their own American dream. But in September 2015, she was suddenly plunged into an American nightmare. She got a call at 6 a.m. one morning from a colleague at Re/Max telling her something terrible had been posted about her on the Re/Max Facebook page. Glennon thought at first she meant that a client had left her a bad review, but it turned out to be much worse than that.”

New York Times: Is Facebook Just a Platform? A Lawyer to the Stars Says No

New York Times: Is Facebook Just a Platform? A Lawyer to the Stars Says No. “Paul Tweed made his name suing news organizations like CNN, Forbes and The National Enquirer on behalf of Hollywood movie stars, winning high-profile cases for celebrities like Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake by hopscotching among Belfast, London and Dublin to take advantage of their favorable defamation or privacy laws. So it was telling last year when Mr. Tweed stopped by the Dublin office of a lawyer for Facebook, Twitter and other social media giants — many of which keep their non-United States headquarters in Ireland for tax reasons — with some half-playful questions.”

The Next Web: Your angry tweets may require libel insurance

The Next Web: Your angry tweets may require libel insurance. “Courtney Love spent almost six years in litigation, accused of libeling her former attorney in a Twitter post that was visible for less than 10 minutes. She paid a reported $780,000 in settlements as a result of two other defamation suits, both stemming from Twitter missives Love wrote about designer Dawn Simorangkir. ‘Twitter should ban my mother,’ her daughter, Frances Bean Cobain, once said. Love, an actress, musician and the widow of late Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain, inherited the band’s publishing rights. She can afford to take on defamation lawsuits. You probably can’t. Given how much of our lives is spent venting on social media, especially in the age of Trump, the more vociferous might want to consider libel insurance.”