New Yorker: The Surprisingly Big Business of Library E-books

New Yorker: The Surprisingly Big Business of Library E-books. “Libraries can buy print books in bulk from any seller that they choose, and, thanks to a legal principle called the first-sale doctrine, they have the right to lend those books to any number of readers free of charge. But the first-sale doctrine does not apply to digital content. For the most part, publishers do not sell their e-books or audiobooks to libraries—they sell digital distribution rights to third-party venders, such as OverDrive, and people like Steve Potash sell lending rights to libraries.”

Book Riot: Available Reads Extension Is A Game Changer

Book Riot: Available Reads Extension Is A Game Changer. “Ever wished you could connect your Goodreads account to your local library’s catalog and know when a book on your TBR is available? Good news: now you can, thanks to the Available Reads extension. The Available Reads extension allows you to see a listing of copies available on OverDrive—one of the most common ebook and audiobook platforms being used in libraries—on every Goodreads review page, as well as your Goodreads bookshelf. You’re able to quickly and easily see whether a book you’re interested in is available locally.”

The Sydney Morning Herald: World’s largest database uncovers Australia’s secret reading passions

The Sydney Morning Herald: World’s largest database uncovers Australia’s secret reading passions . “Researchers from the Australian National University’s literature school will launch this week the new Australian Common Reader website, giving a historical snapshot of the nation’s reading habits drawn from what the university says is the world’s largest database of library borrowing records. The records show borrowing habits – not catalogued books – from six Australian libraries between 1861 and 1928, not including the state libraries of Sydney and Melbourne.”