Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Tool to Search Historical Newspaper Images

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Tool to Search Historical Newspaper Images. “The public can now explore more than 1.5 million historical newspaper images online and free of charge. The latest machine learning experience from Library of Congress Labs, Newspaper Navigator allows users to search visual content in American newspapers dating 1789-1963.”

Library of Congress: American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress Launches Podcast ‘America Works’

Library of Congress: American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress Launches Podcast ‘America Works’. “Each 10-minute episode of ‘America Works’ introduces listeners to an individual worker whose first-person narrative adds to the wealth of our shared national experience. On Thursday, Sept. 3, the first four episodes will become available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and at loc.gov/podcasts. A new episode will be released weekly and featured on the Library’s social media channels beginning Thursday, Sept. 10.”

Library of Congress: The March on Washington in Color

Library of Congress / Unsplash Guest Post: The March on Washington in Color. “[August 28] marks the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington—when a quarter-million people came together to draw attention to the continued challenges and inequalities faced by Black Americans. The two dozen or so color photographs from that day and its leaders are locked down under expensive licenses, inaccessible to the general public, limiting the usage and awareness of one of the most defining moments in American history. Today, we fix this. With the help of the team at the Library and visual historian Jordan Lloyd, we’ve assembled a set of images with no known restrictions from the March, its leaders and segregated America.”

New Online: Digital Edition of the William Howard Taft Papers (HistoryHUB)

HistoryHUB: New Online: Digital Edition of the William Howard Taft Papers. “The papers of William Howard Taft (1857-1930), twenty-seventh president of the United States and tenth chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, consist of approximately 676,000 documents (785,977 images), which have been digitized from 658 reels of previously reproduced microfilm. Held in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division, these papers constitute the largest collection of original Taft documents in the world. The collection contains family papers, personal and official correspondence, presidential and judicial files, speeches and addresses, legal files and notebooks, business and estate papers, engagement calendars, guest lists, scrapbooks, clippings, printed matter, memorabilia, and photographs dating from 1784 to 1973, with the bulk of the material dated 1880-1930.”

Senator John Barrasso: Library of Congress Celebrates Wyoming’s 130th Birthday

Senator John Barrasso: Library of Congress Celebrates Wyoming’s 130th Birthday. “On July 10, 1890, Wyoming became the 44th state of the United States. The Library of Congress has compiled a collection of state maps, art, music, teacher resources and veteran stories unique to the Cowboy State.”

Selected Datasets: A New Library of Congress Collection (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Selected Datasets: A New Library of Congress Collection. “Friends, data wranglers, lend me your ears; The Library of Congress’ Selected Datasets Collection is now live! You can now download datasets of the Simple English Wikipedia, the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, sports economic data, half a million emails from Enron, and urban soil lead abatement from this online collection. This initial set of 20 datasets represents the public start of an ongoing collecting program tied to the Library’s plan to support emerging styles of data-driven research, such as text mining and machine learning.”

Library of Congress: Experimenting with speech-to-text and collections at the Library

Library of Congress: Experimenting with speech-to-text and collections at the Library. “This guest blog post is shared by Chris Adams, Solutions Architect in the Office of the Chief Information Officer/IT Design & Development Directorate, and Julia Kim, Digital Projects Coordinator at the National Library for the Blind and Print Disabled at the Library of Congress, formerly the Digital Assets Specialist at the American Folklife Center, supporting digitized and digital multi-format content for digital preservation and access workflows. In this post, they share more about exploring the feasibility of off-the-shelf tools to enhance description and aid in processing of Library of Congress collections. Read on for more background on the phases of the Speech-to-Text-Viewer experiment from creating the viewer interface to exploring its utility in processing workflows.”

Live for Live Music: Library Of Congress Announces New DJ Tool For Sampling Tracks

Live for Live Music: Library Of Congress Announces New DJ Tool For Sampling Tracks. “Now with Citizen DJ, users are able to thumb through decade’s worth of material from the Library’s audio and moving-image collections. These sounds can come from a variety of resources, stretching back to early recordings of traveling vaudeville acts, royalty-free music, interviews, speeches, and more. While users are able to download specific audio files or mass files in bulk, they are also encouraged to interact with the original source material from the Library’s massive database.”

T.H.E. Journal: Library of Congress Releases App with Mobile Access to Digital Collection

T.H.E. Journal: Library of Congress Releases App with Mobile Access to Digital Collection. “The collection includes audio recordings, books, videos, manuscripts, maps, newspapers, notated music, periodicals, photos, prints and drawings. Besides being able to search and explore the collection, users can also set up personal galleries of items for their own reference and share their curations with others.”

Library of Congress: Spending a Lot of Time at Home? Take the Archive Challenge!

Library of Congress: Spending a Lot of Time at Home? Take the Archive Challenge!. “At the American Folklife Center, we know it’s been hard for those of you who are cooped up at home in order to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Most of the staff live in areas under stay-at-home orders, and have been working from home for weeks. And although some cities and states are starting to open up a little, we have a feeling it will be a while before we’re going out to concerts, theaters, jams, or open mics to perform or enjoy live music and performing arts. But guess what? At the Library of Congress, we have an amazing online archive of folk music and folklife which you can explore right from home, and we’d like to offer a suggestion: why not learn a song, tune, poem, or story from the archive, make a recording or video of yourself performing it, and post it online? Or make a work of art based on one of our photos, or write a story or poem based on our materials. We’d love to see what you come up with! Folks from all genres and creators of all art forms are invited to interpret a field recording, video, photo, or manuscript from the AFC Archive. You don’t need to be a professional in order to participate!”

Library of Congress: No Depression Features Zora Neale Hurston

Library of Congress: No Depression Features Zora Neale Hurston. “We’re happy to announce a new venture in getting our stories out there! We’re working with No Depression, The Journal of Roots Music, which is published by the nonprofit Freshgrass Foundation. They’ll be publishing a column called Roots in the Archive, featuring content from the American Folklife Center and Folklife Today, over at their website.”

New York Times: Meet Your Meme Lords

New York Times: Meet Your Meme Lords. “Future researchers can rest easy: Know Your Meme, Urban Dictionary, Creepypasta and Cute Overload have all been preserved by the Library of Congress. So has the band website for They Might Be Giants and the entire published output of The Toast, the humor site that shut down in 2016. And while the Library of Congress owns a rare print copy of the Gutenberg Bible, the web archive features the LOLCat Bible Translation Project, which rendered the bible in LOLspeak.”

New York Times: Film Treasures, Streaming Courtesy of the Library of Congress

New York Times: Film Treasures, Streaming Courtesy of the Library of Congress. “‘Sneeze’ is just one of many films that you can watch for free online courtesy of the Library of Congress, which partly acquires deposits through the United States Copyright Office. The biggest library in the world, it has an extraordinary trove of online offerings — more than 7,000 videos — that includes hundreds of old (and really old) movies.”

Build a better registry: My intended comments to the Library of Congress on the next Register of Copyrights (Everybody’s Libraries)

Everybody’s Libraries: Build a better registry: My intended comments to the Library of Congress on the next Register of Copyrights. “The Library of Congress is seeking public input on abilities and priorities desired for the next Register of Copyrights, who heads the Copyright Office, a department within the Library of Congress. The deadline for comments as I write this is March 20, though I’m currently having trouble getting the form to accept my input, and operations at the Library, like many other places, are in flux due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Below I reproduce the main portion of the comments I’m hoping to get in before the deadline, in the hope that they will be useful for both them and others interested in copyright. I’ve added a few hyperlinks for context.”