The Cut: One Woman Studied a Million Photos at the Library of Congress

The Cut: One Woman Studied a Million Photos at the Library of Congress . “Renowned museum curator Anne Wilkes Tucker is an inspiration for anyone who dreads a full inbox: She went through one million photographs* housed in the Library of Congress in just a few years, and now she’s selected 440 of them for a sweeping new exhibition in Los Angeles. The show features rarely seen images of iconic moments in American history. ‘I depended on the library staff to bring me boxes,’ she explained in an interview. One morning they brought the NAACP photo archive, and the next: a box filled with Charlie Chaplin.”

New Online: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Online: Benjamin Franklin Papers. “The papers of Benjamin Franklin at the Library of Congress have had almost as adventurous a life as Franklin had himself. They have been abandoned and recovered, cut up by a dressmaker to make patterns and used as collateral for debt. After surviving all of that, they narrowly escaped fiery destruction on a New York pier (more on this later). Now, in a technological development that would have fascinated Franklin, the Manuscript Division is pleased to announce that the papers have been digitized and made available on the Library of Congress website.”

Library of Congress: New Recordings Online for National Poetry Month

Library of Congress: New Recordings Online for National Poetry Month. “National Poetry Month is here, and we’re over the moon to announce the release of 50 additional recordings from the Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature, now available to stream online. The archive—a collection dating back to 1943, when Allen Tate was consultant in poetry—contains nearly 2,000 audio recordings of celebrated poets and writers participating in literary events at the Library of Congress, along with sessions recorded in the recording laboratory in the Library’s Jefferson Building. Most of these recordings were originally captured on magnetic tape reels and have only been accessible by visiting the Library in person.”

Library of Congress: Library Launches Leonard Bernstein Centennial Celebration with Thousands of Bernstein Items Online

Library of Congress: Library Launches Leonard Bernstein Centennial Celebration with Thousands of Bernstein Items Online. “In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth, the Library of Congress has made available online—for the first time—musical manuscripts and scrapbooks from the legendary composer’s personal and professional archives housed in the nation’s library. … The public can now access for free more than 3,700 items, including photos, writings, correspondence, scripts, musical sketches, scrapbooks and audio recordings. This web presentation is a revealing snapshot of Bernstein’s extensive collection at the Library.”

Free to Use and Reuse: Cycling Season Has Arrived! (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Free to Use and Reuse: Cycling Season Has Arrived!. “This month, as warmer weather signals the start of the cycling season, we’re adding to our Free to Use archive all kinds of themed content about bicycles. We’re including images portraying early women cyclers like Strage, but also historical ads featuring bicycles, cartoons, lithographs, maps and more. The Free to Use archive features themed sets of content (such as travel posters, presidential portraits, Civil War drawings, dogs and, now, bicycles) that are all free to use and reuse, meaning there are no known copyright restrictions associated with this content. In other words, you can do whatever you want with it.”

New Online: Branch Rickey Scouting Reports (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Online: Branch Rickey Scouting Reports. “Opening day for Major League Baseball took place last week, on March 29—the earliest opening date in MLB history, excepting for special international events. This year’s opening day also marked the first time in 50 years that a full slate of games was scheduled for the first day. The Library of Congress is marking the beginning of the 2018 season by posting a series of scouting reports compiled by Branch Rickey (1881–1965), a former player, manager and baseball executive, best known as the man responsible for bringing Jackie Robinson into Major League Baseball in 1947, thereby breaking baseball’s long-established color barrier.”

Library of Congress: Archival Materials of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton Now Online

Library of Congress: Archival Materials of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton Now Online. “Archival materials from one of the most successful political partnerships in history, the collaboration of suffragists Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton in the movement for women’s rights, have been digitized and are now available online for the first time from the Library of Congress.”