Library of Congress: More Historical Statutes at Large Available Online

Library of Congress: More Historical Statutes at Large Available Online. “The individual statutes for congresses 68 through 81 are now available on the Law Library of Congress website. This addition closes the gap for the years for which the Statutes at Large were not available on the Internet. As with the volumes for previous congresses, each of these statutes is tagged with tailored, descriptive metadata to help users search and browse by facets.”

Free to Use and Reuse: Making Public Domain and Rights-Clear Content Easier to Find (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Free to Use and Reuse: Making Public Domain and Rights-Clear Content Easier to Find. “One of our biggest challenges is letting you know about all of the content available at loc.gov. Another challenge we have is letting you know what you can do with it (in a nice way). We are working on several fronts to improve the visibility of public domain and rights-clear content. We moved one step in that direction today with the launch of our Free to Use and Reuse page.”

Library of Congress: New VHP Web Feature Marks 75th Anniversary of Guadalcanal Battle

Library of Congress: New VHP Web Feature Marks 75th Anniversary of Guadalcanal Battle. “The Library of Congress’ Veterans History Project (VHP) today launched its new ‘Experiencing War’ website feature, titled ‘Guadalcanal: 75 Years Later,’ recognizing the anniversary of the end of the major World War II campaign known as the Battle of Guadalcanal. The feature highlights 12 digitized collections found in the VHP archive, each of which includes the first-person narrative of a veteran who fought in this epic, six-month offensive in the South Pacific during 1942 and 1943.”

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Tools for Spatial Analysis (part 5 of 7) (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Tools for Spatial Analysis (part 5 of 7). “In what has been often termed the ‘spatial turn,’ quantitative humanities and social sciences have come to emphasize place and space in their analyses. The mass amounts of geographical and temporal data available has lent itself to new ways of imagining and visualizing global networks. Increasingly sophisticated maps and timelines are increasingly simple to make and use. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is the field of techniques and scholarship that combines tabular data with geographical features to query, map, and visualize information. GIS technologies developed in the natural sciences to track things like weather, traffic, and disease patterns, but have moved into the humanities, enabling the spatial mapping of literature and history.”

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Text analysis (part 4 of 7) (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Text analysis (part 4 of 7). “Clean OCR, good metadata, and richly encoded text open up the possibility for different kinds of computer-assisted text analysis. With instructions from humans (“code”), computers can identify information and patterns across large sets of texts that human researchers would be hard-pressed to discover unaided. For example, computers can find out which words in a corpus are used most and least frequently, which words occur near each other often, what linguistic features are typical of a particular author or genre, or how the mood of a plot changes throughout a novel. Franco Moretti describes this kind of analysis as ‘distant reading’, a play on the traditional critical method ‘close reading’. Distant reading implies not the page-by-page study of a few texts, but the aggregation and analysis of large amounts of data.”

Library of Congress: Virtual Card Catalog Available Online

A big thanks to Paul J who sent me a heads-up on this. From the Library of Congress: Virtual Card Catalog Available Online . “As a child growing up in the 1970s, one of my most prized possessions was a Luke Skywalker action figure. He was the hero of my youth, and I was surprised to learn recently that Luke wasn’t always a Skywalker. He was originally a Starkiller. I found this shocking (to me) information while browsing the card catalog in the Copyright Reading Room that’s located in a large room in Washington, DC. Starting today, though, I can see that card from anywhere in the world. With the public release of the Virtual Card Catalog proof of concept, I can browse full-color scans of the cards in indexes from 1955–1970 and 1971–1977. That’s almost 18 million images.”

Library of Congress: Making a Newspaperbot

Library of Congress: Making a Newspaperbot. “The Chronicling America API provides access to historical newspapers from the first half of the 20th century, from geographically diverse sources. Such a collection presents a unique opportunity to retrospectively study the zeitgeist of a nation. Towards that end, ‘Newspaperbot’ is a Twitterbot that tweets out historical newspapers from the Chronicling America API. Everyday in the early hours of morning, the Twitterbot finds all the historical newspapers from that day exactly 100 years ago. The bot then proceeds to tweet the front page of each newspaper accompanied by the title of the journal and the place of publication. It is also accompanied by a link to the item’s location on the Chronicling America website where the reader can access high resolution images of the newspaper.”