Library of Congress: Science Blogs Web Archive

Library of Congress: Science Blogs Web Archive. “This guest post is an interview with Lisa Massengale, Head of the Science Reference Section, with contributions by the Web Archive’s creator Jennifer Harbster, a Science Reference and Research Specialist for the Science, Technology and Business Division from Oct. 2001- Dec. 2015. Along with her reference duties for the Library’s Science Reference Service, she created Everyday Mysteries an online collection of fun and scientifically interesting questions and answers about everyday phenomena. Jennifer is the author of the Saving Science Blogs which provides additional information about the collection.”

Library of Congress: Congressional Research Service Reports Now Available Online

Library of Congress: Congressional Research Service Reports Now Available Online. “I’m pleased to announce that, for the first time, the Library of Congress is providing Congressional Research Service (CRS) reports to the public. The reports are available online at crsreports.congress.gov. Created by experts in CRS, the reports present a legislative perspective on topics such as agriculture policy, counterterrorism operations, banking regulation, veteran’s issues and much more.”

Library of Congress: Veterans History Project Highlights Cold War Collections

Library of Congress: Veterans History Project Highlights Cold War Collections . “The Veterans History Project (VHP) in the Library of Congress today launched a website feature, titled ‘Cold War Dispatches: Service Stories from 1947-1991,’ as part of its ‘Experiencing War’ online series. The feature highlights the stories of veterans who served in non-combatant roles within the military between 1947 and 1991, commonly referred to as the Cold War era.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Set of Educational Apps for Back to School

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Set of Educational Apps for Back to School. “The Library of Congress, in collaboration with educational organizations, today announced the launch of two new web- and mobile-based applications related to Congress and civics for use in K-12 classrooms. These new applications transport students through primary sources to some of the most dramatic turning points in U.S. history and immerse them in the related debates.”

Library of Congress: Exploring Late 1800s Political Cartoons through Interactive Data Visualizations

Library of Congress: Exploring Late 1800s Political Cartoons through Interactive Data Visualizations. “Over the course of my three month internship with the LC Labs team, I developed a website/interactive data visualization which allows users to explore the late 1800s through political cartoons contained in the Cartoon Drawings collection. The main feature of the website is an interactive timeline that displays the number of cartoons in this collection, graphed by year. Users can select specific topics like ‘Grover Cleveland’ or ‘Caricatures’, then the timeline will update to show how these topics are represented over time.” How cool is this?

New Online: The Man Who Would Not Let History Forget Him (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Online: The Man Who Would Not Let History Forget Him. “Robert Lansing spent the height of his career in the shadow of giants but left a paper trail that ensured the world would know his side of the story. Now the Library of Congress has made an important segment of former Secretary of State Robert Lansing’s papers available online.”

New Online: “Poetry of America” Recordings (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Online: “Poetry of America” Recordings. “This summer, we kicked off our refreshed ‘Poetry of America’ series with a selection of new recordings. Originally launched in 2013 as a counterpart to the Library’s ‘Songs of America’ project, the series comprises field recordings from contemporary American poets. Over the years, we’ve asked poets to choose a singular poem written by another American poet from any period in the nation’s history, record themselves reading the poem and then provide commentary that speaks to how the poem connects to, deepens or re-imagines a sense of the nation. We also ask each participating poet to contribute a poem of their own, which we include alongside the feature. Below, we’re highlighting excerpts from recordings added in July, including each poet’s commentary to whet your appetite.”