Live for Live Music: Library Of Congress Announces New DJ Tool For Sampling Tracks

Live for Live Music: Library Of Congress Announces New DJ Tool For Sampling Tracks. “Now with Citizen DJ, users are able to thumb through decade’s worth of material from the Library’s audio and moving-image collections. These sounds can come from a variety of resources, stretching back to early recordings of traveling vaudeville acts, royalty-free music, interviews, speeches, and more. While users are able to download specific audio files or mass files in bulk, they are also encouraged to interact with the original source material from the Library’s massive database.”

T.H.E. Journal: Library of Congress Releases App with Mobile Access to Digital Collection

T.H.E. Journal: Library of Congress Releases App with Mobile Access to Digital Collection. “The collection includes audio recordings, books, videos, manuscripts, maps, newspapers, notated music, periodicals, photos, prints and drawings. Besides being able to search and explore the collection, users can also set up personal galleries of items for their own reference and share their curations with others.”

Library of Congress: Spending a Lot of Time at Home? Take the Archive Challenge!

Library of Congress: Spending a Lot of Time at Home? Take the Archive Challenge!. “At the American Folklife Center, we know it’s been hard for those of you who are cooped up at home in order to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Most of the staff live in areas under stay-at-home orders, and have been working from home for weeks. And although some cities and states are starting to open up a little, we have a feeling it will be a while before we’re going out to concerts, theaters, jams, or open mics to perform or enjoy live music and performing arts. But guess what? At the Library of Congress, we have an amazing online archive of folk music and folklife which you can explore right from home, and we’d like to offer a suggestion: why not learn a song, tune, poem, or story from the archive, make a recording or video of yourself performing it, and post it online? Or make a work of art based on one of our photos, or write a story or poem based on our materials. We’d love to see what you come up with! Folks from all genres and creators of all art forms are invited to interpret a field recording, video, photo, or manuscript from the AFC Archive. You don’t need to be a professional in order to participate!”

Library of Congress: No Depression Features Zora Neale Hurston

Library of Congress: No Depression Features Zora Neale Hurston. “We’re happy to announce a new venture in getting our stories out there! We’re working with No Depression, The Journal of Roots Music, which is published by the nonprofit Freshgrass Foundation. They’ll be publishing a column called Roots in the Archive, featuring content from the American Folklife Center and Folklife Today, over at their website.”

New York Times: Meet Your Meme Lords

New York Times: Meet Your Meme Lords. “Future researchers can rest easy: Know Your Meme, Urban Dictionary, Creepypasta and Cute Overload have all been preserved by the Library of Congress. So has the band website for They Might Be Giants and the entire published output of The Toast, the humor site that shut down in 2016. And while the Library of Congress owns a rare print copy of the Gutenberg Bible, the web archive features the LOLCat Bible Translation Project, which rendered the bible in LOLspeak.”

New York Times: Film Treasures, Streaming Courtesy of the Library of Congress

New York Times: Film Treasures, Streaming Courtesy of the Library of Congress. “‘Sneeze’ is just one of many films that you can watch for free online courtesy of the Library of Congress, which partly acquires deposits through the United States Copyright Office. The biggest library in the world, it has an extraordinary trove of online offerings — more than 7,000 videos — that includes hundreds of old (and really old) movies.”

Build a better registry: My intended comments to the Library of Congress on the next Register of Copyrights (Everybody’s Libraries)

Everybody’s Libraries: Build a better registry: My intended comments to the Library of Congress on the next Register of Copyrights. “The Library of Congress is seeking public input on abilities and priorities desired for the next Register of Copyrights, who heads the Copyright Office, a department within the Library of Congress. The deadline for comments as I write this is March 20, though I’m currently having trouble getting the form to accept my input, and operations at the Library, like many other places, are in flux due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Below I reproduce the main portion of the comments I’m hoping to get in before the deadline, in the hope that they will be useful for both them and others interested in copyright. I’ve added a few hyperlinks for context.”

Library of Congress: By the People Launches First Wholly Non-English Crowdsourced Transcription Project

Library of Congress: By the People Launches First Wholly Non-English Crowdsourced Transcription Project. “The Library’s crowdsourcing initiative By the People has launched its newest campaign to enlist the public’s help to make digital collection items more searchable and accessible online. Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents includes thousands of pages of historical documents in Spanish, Latin and Catalan.”

Library of Congress: New Collaboration between LC Labs, British Library, and the Zooniverse

Library of Congress: New Collaboration between LC Labs, British Library, and the Zooniverse. “The project is titled ‘From crowdsourcing to digitally-enabled participation: the state of the art in collaboration, access, and inclusion for cultural heritage institutions,’ resulting from this call. The project will convene experts in several ways over the next 12 months. Together, these groups will describe and document practical approaches and future paths in crowdsourcing through a book sprint, and open comment period, and a follow up workshop.”

Free to Use and Reuse: Movie Magic (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Free to Use and Reuse: Movie Magic. “You can see the Riviera in all its long-lost splendor, and dozens of other unique movie theaters, in this month’s set of Free to Use and Reuse prints and photographs from the Library’s collections of copyright-free material. There’s the neon-lit Tower Theater, a Sacramento landmark. Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles. The Ritz Theatre in Greenville, Alabama, an Art Deco building opened in 1935 and now devoted to the performing arts.”

Library of Congress: Photography Archive of Shawn Walker and a Collection of Harlem Photography Workshop Acquired by Library of Congress

Library of Congress: Photography Archive of Shawn Walker and a Collection of Harlem Photography Workshop Acquired by Library of Congress. “The Shawn Walker archive contains nearly 100,000 photographs, negatives and transparencies depicting life in Harlem — a pivotal crossroad of African diaspora culture — between 1963 and the present. The Kamoinge collection — generously donated by Walker — consists of nearly 2,500 items, including prints by Kamoinge members such as Barboza, Draper, Smith and others.”

The Magnificent Seven: Looking Back on a Year of Exploring the Web Archives Datasets (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: The Magnificent Seven: Looking Back on a Year of Exploring the Web Archives Datasets. “It has been just over a year since we kicked off a deep dive into the Library of Congress Web Archives on the Signal! Now at over 2 petabytes, the web archives are a complex aggregation of interrelated web objects that make up the internet as we know it (images, text, code, audio, video, etc.). In keeping with the Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress, we are working to ‘throw open the treasure chest’ by making this digital content as broadly available as possible. However, without the proper tools to navigate this complex resource, users may think of the treasure chest as more of a Pandora’s box! “

Library of Congress: Crowdsourcing Project Launches Campaign to Transcribe Rosa Parks’ Papers and Reveal the Woman Behind the Legend

Library of Congress: Crowdsourcing Project Launches Campaign to Transcribe Rosa Parks’ Papers and Reveal the Woman Behind the Legend. “By the People, the Library of Congress’ crowdsourced transcription project powered by volunteers across the country is launching a campaign to transcribe Rosa Parks’ personal papers to make them more searchable and accessible online, including many items featured in the exhibition, ‘Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words,’ starting [February 4], the 107th anniversary of her birth.”

American Federation of Labor: History Now Digital (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: American Federation of Labor: History Now Digital. “Americans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries witnessed the growth of two transformative but intertwined forces: massive waves of immigration from 1880 to 1920 and the roiling discontent of labor. Few organizations struggled to balance these developments more than the American Federation of Labor, one of the nation’s premier labor organizations.”

Washington Post: It wasn’t just the National Archives. The Library of Congress also balked at a Women’s March photo.

Washington Post: It wasn’t just the National Archives. The Library of Congress also balked at a Women’s March photo.. “The Library of Congress abandoned plans last year to showcase a mural-size photograph of demonstrators at the 2017 Women’s March in Washington because of concerns it would be perceived as critical of President Trump, according to emails obtained by The Washington Post.”