Library of Congress Blog: Now Online! The Gandhara Scroll, a Rare 2,000-Year-Old Text of Early Buddhism

Library of Congress Blog: Now Online! The Gandhara Scroll, a Rare 2,000-Year-Old Text of Early Buddhism. “The Library’s Gandhara Scroll, one of the world’s oldest Buddhist manuscripts, has been painstakingly preserved and digitized, making it available to readers online after years of delicate work. The document, written on a birch bark scroll about 2,000 years ago, offers rare insight into the eary history of Buddhism.”

Library of Congress: Papers of President James Garfield Now Online

Library of Congress: Papers of President James Garfield Now Online. “The papers of President James A. Garfield, who was assassinated in the first year of his short presidency, have been digitized and are now available online for the first time from the Library of Congress. The Garfield collection includes approximately 80,000 items, mostly dating from 1850 to 1881.”

New: Omar Bin Said Story Map (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New: Omar Bin Said Story Map. “When the Library’s Omar Ibn Said Collection was put online earlier this year, the multi-national, multi-lingual story presented a challenge: How best to tell Said’s incredible journey? Born into wealth in an area known as Futa Toro (in modern-day Senegal) around 1770, he was an educated and respected man in his early 30s, a devout Muslim, when he was taken prisoner during a regional conflict and sold into slavery. He survived the middle passage in chains, was enslaved on a South Carolina plantation, escaped, but was recaptured in North Carolina. His eventual owners, a politically prominent family, treated him as a special case. He spent his last years as a well-regarded curiosity, often in touch with scholars. He died in 1863, still enslaved, during the Civil War.”

Library of Congress: The Experimental Congress.gov Browser Extension Can Now Search the Compilation of Presidential Documents

Library of Congress: The Experimental Congress.gov Browser Extension Can Now Search the Compilation of Presidential Documents. “This latest update to the experimental Google Chrome Congress.gov browser extension that is hosted by LC Labs adds the ability to highlight text on a page and search for it in the Compilation of Presidential Documents on govinfo. The compilation includes executive orders and executive proclamations issued after 1992.”

In the Library’s Web Archives: Totally Tabular Data (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: In the Library’s Web Archives: Totally Tabular Data. “Analysis of data from the Library of Congress Web Archives is useful in documenting how various forms of tabular data have become part of digital government publishing. We introduced the file datasets and our methods of creating them in recent posts about our PDF and audio datasets, and are glad to be continuing the series with the release of three CSV/TSV/XLS datasets. A wide range of government agencies are making tabular data available in these formats and many of these files have been archived in the Library of Congress Web Archives. Essentially, all of what we find in these files is—structurally speaking—tabular data. Still, exploring these sample datasets illustrates some of the varied and creative ways that these kinds of files have been used by different federal agencies.”

Library of Congress: Integrating Wikidata at the Library of Congress

Library of Congress: Integrating Wikidata at the Library of Congress. “While we have added many external links to id.loc.gov in the past the addition of Wikidata is very different. Previously these types of mappings have been fairly static and provided by the contributing institution. With Wikidata the contributing institution is an active open community of editors. This means anyone can contribute to the process. When a Library of Congress identifier is added to a Wikidata page it will appear on id.loc.gov once the data is refreshed. Anyone can help us build connections between these two knowledge systems by adding Library of Congress identifiers to Wikidata.”

Chronicling America: 15 Million and Counting! (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Chronicling America: 15 Million and Counting!. “Since 2005, libraries, historical societies, and other institutions throughout the country have contributed newspapers from their collections to Chronicling America. This process is part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a collaborative program sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress. To date, we have more than 2800 newspapers from 46 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. To mark the 15 million milestone, we are throwing a #ChronAmParty on Twitter to highlight all of the things to be found in 15 million newspaper pages – from the funny and fantastic to the historically significant!”