CNN: At least 50,000 license plates leaked in hack of border contractor not authorized to retain them

CNN: At least 50,000 license plates leaked in hack of border contractor not authorized to retain them. “At least 50,000 American license plate numbers have been made available on the dark web after a company hired by Customs and Border Protection was at the center of a major data breach, according to CNN analysis of the hacked data. What’s more, the company was never authorized to keep the information, the agency told CNN.”

The Register: Maker of US border’s license-plate scanning tech ransacked by hacker, blueprints and files dumped online

The Register: Maker of US border’s license-plate scanning tech ransacked by hacker, blueprints and files dumped online. “The maker of vehicle license plate readers used extensively by the US government and cities to identify and track citizens and immigrants has been hacked. Its internal files were pilfered, and are presently being offered for free on the dark web to download.”

Techdirt: Vigilant And Its Customers Are Lying About ICE’s Access To Plate Records

Techdirt: Vigilant And Its Customers Are Lying About ICE’s Access To Plate Records. “Everyone’s hooking up ICE with automatic license plate reader (ALPR) data. And everyone’s misleading the public about it, starting with ALPR manufacturer, Vigilant. The EFF has been investigating California law enforcement’s data sharing claims with relation to its Vigilant ALPRs and finding their public statements are directly contradicted by internal communications obtained with public records requests.”

TechCrunch: Police license plate readers are still exposed on the internet

TechCrunch: Police license plate readers are still exposed on the internet. “Considered a massive invasion of privacy by many and legally questionable by some, there are tens of thousands of ALPR readers across the U.S. collectively reading and recording thousand of license plates — and locations — every minute, the ACLU says, becoming one of the new and emerging forms of mass surveillance in the U.S. But some cameras are connected to the internet, and are easily identifiable. Worse, some are leaking sensitive data about vehicles and their drivers — and many have weak security protections that make them easily accessible.”

Ars Technica: Feds won’t build license plate database—they just want access to one

Ars Technica: Feds won’t build license plate database—they just want access to one. “Just over a year ago, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) sought a contractor to build and operate a national license plate reader database. After some controversy, that plan was eventually pulled. According to a new ad posted Thursday, the agency now wants to ‘obtain query-based access to a commercially available License Plate Reader (LPR) database.'”