National Institute on Aging: The Neighborhood Atlas—Free Social Determinants of Health Data for All!

National Institute on Aging: The Neighborhood Atlas—Free Social Determinants of Health Data for All!. “Developed by Amy Kind, M.D., Ph.D., and her team at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, the Neighborhood Atlas2 is a user-friendly, online tool that enables customized ranking and mapping of neighborhoods according to socioeconomic disadvantage across the full U.S., including Puerto Rico. Anyone can use the Neighborhood Atlas, not just researchers: If you can use a smartphone mapping app, you can use the Atlas — no fancy degree required!”

EurekAlert: King’s College AI-Longevity Hub launched via support of Biogerontology Research Foundation

EurekAlert: King’s College AI-Longevity Hub launched via support of Biogerontology Research Foundation. “The UK’s first AI for Longevity hub — the Longevity AI Consortium — is launched at King’s College London with the strategic and financial support of the Biogerontology Research Foundation and Deep Knowledge Ventures.”

UC Davis Health: $4 million grant to UC Davis and Drexel tests online tool for caregivers of individuals with dementia

UC Davis Health: $4 million grant to UC Davis and Drexel tests online tool for caregivers of individuals with dementia. “Agitation and aggression are just a few of the behavioral and psychological symptoms that people with Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders – and their caregivers — can have difficulty understanding and managing. But an easy-to-use online platform, called WeCareAdvisor, aims to bridge the information gap for caregivers, who are typically family members. The tool educates caregivers about dementia and provides daily tips for managing stress. It also offers a systematic approach for describing, investigating, creating and evaluating strategies, known as the DICE approach.”

Mosaic Science: How can doctors find better ways to talk – and listen – to patients close to death?

Mosaic Science: How can doctors find better ways to talk – and listen – to patients close to death?. “Two brothers are combining palliative care expertise, linguistics and AI to encourage more effective conversations between doctors and people receiving end-of-life care.” This story just grabbed me and swallowed me whole. I hope there are enough Kleenex in the house.

The Next Web: Meet the YouTube Mortician teaching people not to fear death

The Next Web: Meet the YouTube Mortician teaching people not to fear death. “Death is something we as a society don’t care to think or talk about — unless, like me, you stay up at night pondering about the inevitability of the inevitable. It’s not a case of ‘if’ you die, it’s ‘when’ you’ll die, and that’s a hard pill to swallow. But Caitlin Doughty, a LA-based Mortician and YouTube host of the channel, Ask A Mortician, answers all of our inquisitive and creepy questions about death — from what happens to breast implants in a crematory machine to what happens to a fetus if a woman dies when pregnant — everything that my young death-starved self needs and wants to know.”

Wired: Now Even Funerals Are Livestreamed—and Families Are Grateful

Wired: Now Even Funerals Are Livestreamed—and Families Are Grateful . “In a culture obsessed with tweeting and Instagramming every moment of life, it’s little surprise that streaming extends to death. Funeral livestreaming services have been around for more than a decade, but the practice has recently exploded in popularity, says Bryant Hightower, president-elect of the National Funeral Directors Association.”

CNET: How families are giving a fantastic trip to loved ones in hospice

CNET: How families are giving a fantastic trip to loved ones in hospice. “VR may get a bad rap as a once-hot tech trend that failed to live up to expectations, but companies haven’t given up on it. Facebook last month released the $400 Oculus Quest, which CNET editor Scott Stein called the best thing he’s tried this year. And virtual reality has made headway outside of the consumer world. For example, using VR for hospice care — as a way to bring a larger world to people who’ve found themselves limited to a room, or just a bed — is beginning to catch on with care providers. “