Seeing the light: researchers develop new AI system using light to learn associatively (University of Oxford)

University of Oxford: Seeing the light: researchers develop new AI system using light to learn associatively . “Researchers at Oxford University’s Department of Materials, working in collaboration with colleagues from Exeter and Munster have developed an on-chip optical processor capable of detecting similarities in datasets up to 1,000 times faster than conventional machine learning algorithms running on electronic processors.”

Ars Technica: New “Glowworm attack” recovers audio from devices’ power LEDs

Ars Technica: New “Glowworm attack” recovers audio from devices’ power LEDs. “Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have demonstrated a novel way to spy on electronic conversations. A new paper released today outlines a novel passive form of the TEMPEST attack called Glowworm, which converts minute fluctuations in the intensity of power LEDs on speakers and USB hubs back into the audio signals that caused those fluctuations.”

Nevada Today: University Libraries celebrate Artown 2021

Nevada Today: University Libraries celebrate Artown 2021. “Many of Nevada’s iconic neon signs are fading away. Which is why the University Libraries at the University of Nevada, Reno created Neon in Nevada. Neon in Nevada is a collaborative project documenting and preserving images of neon signs from across the state in a digital archive. In partnering with UNLV Libraries, the Nevada Historical Society, rural Nevada towns, and others, this project is truly a state-wide effort. It is vital in keeping the familiar glow of neon and its history in Nevada alive. The digital archive will go live in August 2021, and the public will be able to view and interact with photos of neon signs in Nevada like never before.”

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting. “Lighting sources could indeed hold vital clues to the different ways prehistoric peoples used caves, according to a new paper by a team of Spanish scientists, published in the journal PLOS ONE. They conducted in situ experiments with three different kinds of Paleolithic lighting sources in the hopes of shedding some light (pun intended) on what those various illumination methods might tell us about the emergence of ‘human symbolic and artistic behavior’ in the form of cave art.”

LED lights found to kill coronavirus: Global first in fight against COVID-19 (Tel Aviv University)

Tel Aviv University: LED lights found to kill coronavirus: Global first in fight against COVID-19. “Researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) have proven that the coronavirus can be killed efficiently, quickly, and cheaply using ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). They believe that the UV-LED technology will soon be available for private and commercial use.”

Ubergizmo: Hackers Can Steal Your Data From Your Monitor’s Brightness

Ubergizmo: Hackers Can Steal Your Data From Your Monitor’s Brightness. “According to a report from The Hacker News, it seems that hackers have figured out a way to steal information off a computer simply based on the brightness of your display. This makes it a great hack for computers that are standing alone and aren’t connected wirelessly to a network or to other computers.” I never know whether to be impressed or annoyed by articles like this.

Debate Report: New Web-Based App Showcases Earth’s Light Emissions

Debate Report: New Web-Based App Showcases Earth’s Light Emissions. “A large amount of the datasets provided by scientific satellites is available for free, but they aren’t accessible for the general public. A new web application will facilitate access to satellite imagery of Earth. Radiance Light Trends allows users to inspect a specific region or site and observe how Earth’s light emissions changed in the last decades, with the earliest data being collected in 1992.”