EOS: Have You Seen Ball Lightning? Scientists Want to Know About It

EOS: Have You Seen Ball Lightning? Scientists Want to Know About It. “Ball lightning has been reported for centuries but hasn’t been reliably observed by scientific instruments. A new website hosted by New Mexico Tech physicist Richard Sonnenfeld and Texas State University engineer Karl Stephan is collecting eyewitness accounts to improve the basic understanding of the phenomenon. They’ll compare the accounts with weather radar systems to characterize the factors that could lead to ball lightning.”

CNN: The US could see the fewest recorded deaths from lightning strikes this year

CNN: The US could see the fewest recorded deaths from lightning strikes this year. “In a year of increasingly bleak headlines, here’s one uplifting piece of news: The US is on track to experience the fewest recorded deaths from lightning strikes in a single year. Fourteen people have died from lightning strikes in the US so far this year. And because peak lightning season in the Northern Hemisphere takes place during June, July and August, the worst is likely behind us.” It’s not clear if this is the pandemic keeping people inside, deaths not being reported, or something meteorological. But I’m including it here because it’s interesting.

EurekAlert: Using AI to predict where and when lightning will strike

EurekAlert: Using AI to predict where and when lightning will strike. “At EPFL’s School of Engineering, researchers in the Electromagnetic Compatibility Laboratory, led by Farhad Rachidi, have developed a simple and inexpensive system that can predict when lightning will strike to the nearest 10 to 30 minutes, within a 30-kilometer radius. The system uses a combination of standard meteorological data and artificial intelligence.”