The Register: Afraid of the big bad Linux desktop? Zorin 16.1 is here

The Register: Afraid of the big bad Linux desktop? Zorin 16.1 is here. “Zorin 16.1 has arrived, marking the first major update of the Linux distribution since August’s release. Unashamedly user-friendly, with an interface unlikely to scare off Windows or Mac users, the most eye-catching element of the update is LibreOffice 7.3, replete with better Microsoft Office compatibility, improved performance, and tweaks for dark mode fans.”

Best Linux distros for beginners 2022: You can do this! (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Best Linux distros for beginners 2022: You can do this!. “For those of you who haven’t met me before, I’ve been using Linux as a desktop operating system since 1993, two years after Linux was created. And, long before that, I was using Unix as a desktop. Since then, I’ve used dozens of different Linux distributions, and I ran the Desktop Linux site for many years. Today, although I also run Windows and macOS, the Linux desktop is my main desktop. In short, I know the Linux desktop. So, with all that, here are my suggestions for the best desktops for beginners.”

Ars Technica: Backdoor for Windows, macOS, and Linux went undetected until now

Ars Technica: Backdoor for Windows, macOS, and Linux went undetected until now. “The discovery is significant for several reasons. First, fully cross-platform malware is something of a rarity, with most malicious software being written for a specific operating system. The backdoor was also written from scratch and made use of four separate command-and-control servers, an indication that the people who developed and used it were part of an advanced threat actor that invested significant resources. It’s also unusual for previously unseen Linux malware to be found in a real-world attack.”

It’s FOSS: Here are the New Features Coming to Ubuntu 22.04 LTS

It’s FOSS: Here are the New Features Coming to Ubuntu 22.04 LTS. “Ubuntu fans! It’s time to get excited about the next big release which is Ubuntu 22.04 LTS. Yes. It is a long term support release and it will be supported for five years till April 2027. The upcoming LTS release brings several new features. If you are using Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, you will notice numerous visual changes. If you are using Ubuntu 21.10, you already have seen plenty of changes but there will still be a few new ones in the upcoming release.”

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best Spotify Alternatives for Linux You Should Try

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best Spotify Alternatives for Linux You Should Try. “Using an open-source operating system such as Linux calls for using open-source entertainment apps. Even though Spotify has plenty of native versions available for desktop and mobile platforms, many users prefer using alternatives packed with exciting features. If that sounds like you, you’re in for a surprise, as Linux has a ton of fine-tuned Spotify alternatives, which allow you to listen to music right from your desktop.”

Pete Warden: Launching spchcat, an open-source speech recognition tool for Linux and Raspberry Pi

Pete Warden: Launching spchcat, an open-source speech recognition tool for Linux and Raspberry Pi. “I’ve been following the Coqui.ai team’s work since they launched, and was very impressed by the quality of the open source speech models and code they have produced. I didn’t have an easy way to run them myself though, especially on live microphone input. With that in mind, I decided my holiday project would be writing a command line tool using Coqui’s speech to text library. To keep it as straightforward as possible I modeled it on the classic Unix cat command, where the default would be to read audio from a microphone and output text (though it ended up expanding to system audio and files too) so I called it spchcat.”

MakeUseOf: ExplainShell: A Web-Based Alternative to the Traditional Linux Man Pages

MakeUseOf: ExplainShell: A Web-Based Alternative to the Traditional Linux Man Pages. “No matter how experienced you’re with the Linux command line, there will always be times when you’ll encounter unfamiliar commands. In such situations, while the natural instinct is to either refer to man pages or google the command to figure out what it does, what if we tell you there’s a better (read immersive) way to do it. Well, as it turns out, there’s a tool called ExplainShell that does exactly that: tells you what each part of a shell command does in an easy-to-comprehend manner.”

The Register: ‘Apps for GNOME’ site aims to improve discovery of the project’s best applications

The Register: ‘Apps for GNOME’ site aims to improve discovery of the project’s best applications. “The GNOME project has created Apps for GNOME, a website to ‘feature the best applications in the GNOME ecosystem,’ according to creator Sophie Herold. The scope of the GNOME project is extensive and includes low-level system components, a toolkit for developers of GUI applications (GTK), a desktop shell and window manager, and numerous applications built with these technologies.”

The Register: Zorin OS 16 Pro arrives complete with optional ‘Windows 11’ desktop

The Register: Zorin OS 16 Pro arrives complete with optional ‘Windows 11’ desktop. “Zorin OS is one of a few commercial Linux distributions which aim to be user-friendly alternatives to Windows and Mac. The OS is open source and pricing is based on a freemium model, with free Core, Lite and Education editions, and a paid for Pro edition (formerly called Ultimate).” I haven’t used Zorin in a few years, but I really liked it. I installed it on my husband’s old laptop and he, who is not geekly like me and very much a Windows guy, took to it quickly.

Neowin: Linux Mint 20.2 arrives, upgrade path made available too

Neowin: Linux Mint 20.2 arrives, upgrade path made available too. “The Linux Mint team has announced the release of Linux Mint 20.2 ‘Uma’. Surprisingly, the upgrade path has also been opened up today. In the past, users normally had to wait a week or two before upgrades were allowed from older Mint versions but it looks like the team was confident enough to allow upgrades right away.”

ZDNet: How to switch from Windows 7 to Chrome OS CloudReady

ZDNet: How to switch from Windows 7 to Chrome OS CloudReady. “The main reason to use this as a Windows alternative is its ease of use. It’s also free for individual users who don’t require Google Admin tools. The only difference between the home version and the two business ones is is it doesn’t come with technical support or access to Google Admin Console. Besides giving your Windows 7 PC a new lease on life, you’ll find it will make it peppier. CloudReady is much lighter on system resources than any version of Windows.”