Now Available: Chicago Literary Archive

Spotted via a paywalled Chicago Tribune article: Chicago Literary Archive. “The Chicago Literary Archive is an independent, open-source research guide to Chicago’s literary, printing, and publishing history from 1837 to today. Founded by Adam Morgan in 2021, the CLA is viewable and editable by anyone interested in Chicago literature. To add your own research, all you need is a WordPress account and an invitation.”

DigiPhiLit: A digital project for Philippine literature (Manila Times)

New-to-me, from Manila Times: DigiPhiLit: A digital project for Philippine literature. “TWO weeks ago, I wrote an article where I highlighted the importance of preserving sources, documents, books and old imprints. The existence of these should not be taken for granted, as in a nation such as the Philippines, which is prone to floods, typhoons, earthquakes and fires, these are exposed to irremediable loss. … Largely unnoticed is a praiseworthy initiative named DigiPhiLit.”

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!. “It’s that time again — the judges’ scores and comments are in, and we’ve selected the winners of our third annual public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1925! As you know, we asked game designers of all stripes to submit new creations based on works published in 1925 that entered the public domain in the US this year — and just as in the past two jams, people got very creative in terms of choosing source material and deciding what to do with it.”

Tech Xplore: Spotify tests audiobooks of classics including ‘Persuasion,’ ‘Frankenstein’

Tech Xplore: Spotify tests audiobooks of classics including ‘Persuasion,’ ‘Frankenstein’. “Streaming giant Spotify is extending its foray into audiobooks, dropping nine new public-domain classics narrated by celebrities including Hilary Swank and Forest Whitaker. The platform known best for its music has used podcasts to drive growth since 2019, and recently began bolstering its audiobook selection.”

Penn State News: Behrend professor leading effort to create a digitized ‘Frankenstein’

Penn State News: Behrend professor leading effort to create a digitized ‘Frankenstein’. “In 2017, [Elisa] Beshero-Bondar joined colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Maryland in an effort to digitally collate all five versions of ‘Frankenstein’: Shelley’s original draft, written in 1816 for a ghost story challenge at the home of the poet Lord Byron; the manuscript published in 1818; the ‘Thomas copy,’ in which Shelley had hand-written edits in the margins of the 1818 book; the 1823 version, which was published by Shelley’s father and was the first to recognize her as the author; and the 1831 edition, which is the version most familiar to anyone who read ‘Frankenstein’ in high school or college.” The entire manuscript collection is not online yet; it’s about 1/3 complete.

Library of Congress: Hispanic Audio Archive Rebrands as the PALABRA Archive and Releases New Recordings

Library of Congress: Hispanic Audio Archive Rebrands as the PALABRA Archive and Releases New Recordings. “With the Library’s Hispanic Heritage Month festivities underway, it is time to celebrate one of our institution’s most treasured Luso-Hispanic collections. This year, as is tradition during the heritage celebrations, the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress announces the release of fifty new audio recordings from the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape (AHLOT) for online streaming. The release makes available new material from this literary audio archive of Iberian, Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX poets and writers reading from their works.”

Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’ (Adam Matthew)

Adam Matthew: Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’. “Drawn from the holdings of the National Library of Scotland, AM Digital’s latest collection, Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive is an unparalleled resource for scholars and academics interested in the history of the book, literature and nineteenth-century history. From its inception in 1768, the John Murray publishing house worked with influential authors whose famed titles continue to shape literature to this day, including Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Herman Melville and Lord Byron.” If you’re not familiar with Adam Matthew, I’ll let you know it’s not free.

‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”

EurekAlert: Canterbury Tales is first major literary work developed as an app

EurekAlert: Canterbury Tales is first major literary work developed as an app. “A University of Saskatchewan-led international team has produced the first web and mobile phone app of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales–the first major literary work augmented by new scholarship, in any language, presented in an app.” This app also features the work of Monty Python alum Terry Jones.

Boston University: ASC Launches Research Project on Ajamī Literature in West Africa

Boston University: ASC Launches Research Project on Ajamī Literature in West Africa. ASC is the African Studies Center. “The research project will identify and digitize manuscripts in four major West African languages – Hausa, Mandinka, Fula, and Wolof, transcribe the texts and translate them into English and French, prepare commentaries, and create related multimedia resources to be made widely available within and beyond the United States. The Ajamī literatures that have developed in sub-Saharan Africa and hold a wealth of knowledge on the history, politics, cosmologies, and cultures of the region, are generally unknown to scholars and the public due to lack of access.”

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton. “It is well known that Shakespeare was a huge influence on Milton. From learning how to write nature poetry to creating charismatic villains, Milton’s debt to his forebear continues to fascinate experts. The younger poet once praised the ‘wonder and astonishment’ that this ‘great heir of fame’ conjured up in his readers. But now, Jason Scott-Warren from Cambridge’s English Faculty believes he has identified even more tangible evidence of this connection.”

Korea Herald: National Museum of Korean Literature to be more than repository of books

Korea Herald: National Museum of Korean Literature to be more than repository of books. “The museum hopes to develop into a cultural complex, allowing visitors to enjoy diverse contents related to literature. For instance, the museum’s auditorium will function as a venue for performances related to Korean literature. The institution also asserted the need to digitize data. It will make digital copies of works and preserve them for future research. It hopes to open up a digital library before the official launch of the library.”