‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”

Literature online: Research into reading habits almost in real time (Science Daily)

ScienceDaily: Literature online: Research into reading habits almost in real time. “Young people make intensive use of digital networks to read, write and comment on literary texts. But their reading behavior varies considerably depending on whether the title is from the world of popular or classic literature, as revealed by a new study.”

EurekAlert: Canterbury Tales is first major literary work developed as an app

EurekAlert: Canterbury Tales is first major literary work developed as an app. “A University of Saskatchewan-led international team has produced the first web and mobile phone app of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales–the first major literary work augmented by new scholarship, in any language, presented in an app.” This app also features the work of Monty Python alum Terry Jones.

Boston University: ASC Launches Research Project on Ajamī Literature in West Africa

Boston University: ASC Launches Research Project on Ajamī Literature in West Africa. ASC is the African Studies Center. “The research project will identify and digitize manuscripts in four major West African languages – Hausa, Mandinka, Fula, and Wolof, transcribe the texts and translate them into English and French, prepare commentaries, and create related multimedia resources to be made widely available within and beyond the United States. The Ajamī literatures that have developed in sub-Saharan Africa and hold a wealth of knowledge on the history, politics, cosmologies, and cultures of the region, are generally unknown to scholars and the public due to lack of access.”

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton. “It is well known that Shakespeare was a huge influence on Milton. From learning how to write nature poetry to creating charismatic villains, Milton’s debt to his forebear continues to fascinate experts. The younger poet once praised the ‘wonder and astonishment’ that this ‘great heir of fame’ conjured up in his readers. But now, Jason Scott-Warren from Cambridge’s English Faculty believes he has identified even more tangible evidence of this connection.”

Korea Herald: National Museum of Korean Literature to be more than repository of books

Korea Herald: National Museum of Korean Literature to be more than repository of books. “The museum hopes to develop into a cultural complex, allowing visitors to enjoy diverse contents related to literature. For instance, the museum’s auditorium will function as a venue for performances related to Korean literature. The institution also asserted the need to digitize data. It will make digital copies of works and preserve them for future research. It hopes to open up a digital library before the official launch of the library.”

Just Launched: Literary Authors from Europe and Eurasia Web Archive (Columbia University Libraries)

Colubmia University Libraries: Just Launched: Literary Authors from Europe and Eurasia Web Archive. “I am pleased to announce the launch of the Literary Authors from Europe and Eurasia Web Archive, comprised of captured website content related to literary authors (of both fiction and non-fiction essays), translators, critics, and publishers from Europe and Eurasia.”