Smithsonian Magazine: A Dictionary of Science Fiction Runs From Afrofuturism to Zero-G

Smithsonian Magazine: A Dictionary of Science Fiction Runs From Afrofuturism to Zero-G. “In the summer of 1987, movie audiences first met Robocop in the science fiction classic about violence and corrupt corporate power in a future, dystopian Detroit. But the title word is much older than that, going back at least to a 1957 short story by writer Harlan Ellison, in which a tentacled “robocop” pursues a character. The prefix ‘robo-,’ in turn, dates at least to 1945, when Astounding Science Fiction published a story by A.E. van Vogt mentioning ‘roboplanes’ flying through the sky…. This is the kind of rabbit hole a reader can go down in the Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction, a resource decades in the making that is now available to the public in an accessible form. Lexicographer Jesse Sheidlower started the project years ago, when he was an editor at the Oxford English Dictionary.

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Rhythm Action Gatsby (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Rhythm Action Gatsby. “From the name alone, you can probably guess what the game is: rhythm action games are a popular genre, and hey, why not make one for The Great Gatsby? The premise is presented as a joke, with the designer describing it as ‘the way F. Scott Fitzgerald would have wanted his legacy to be maintained’ — but the game doesn’t just lean on this one bit of amusing silliness, nor does it cut any corners in fulfilling its promise. Rather, it’s full of handcrafted original material.”

Mashable: Listen to deepfake Gucci Mane read classic literature

Mashable: Listen to deepfake Gucci Mane read classic literature. “Mark Twain once said that the mark of a classic is that everyone wants to have read it but not actually read it. It makes sense: Classics must provide some artistic or cultural value to be considered ‘classic’ — but they’re just so boring. MSCHF just made the Western canon more exciting with Project Gucciberg. It’s Project Gutenberg (a collection of public domain Western literature) meets the rapper Gucci Mane. Using Artificial Intelligence, MSCHF recreated his voice to read classics from Pride and Prejudice to Don Quixote.” And Little Women. I think you might need headphones to appreciate this completely.

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: The Great Gatsby Tabletop Roleplaying Game (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: The Great Gatsby Tabletop Roleplaying Game. “Best Adaptation is always an interesting category in these jams, because every entry is on some level an adaptation, but that doesn’t mean they are all truly good candidates for the prize. Some make use of elements of a public domain work in a way that detaches them from their source, others focus so closely on the source that it is more like a study of the original — both those things can be amazing, and both approaches show up among our winners this year. But there’s also something special about a game that turns a public domain work into something brand new while also carrying forth and further exploring its original meaning and context. That’s the kind of game that is a candidate for Best Adaptation, and that’s the kind of game The Great Gatsby: The Tabletop Roleplaying […]

Now Available: Chicago Literary Archive

Spotted via a paywalled Chicago Tribune article: Chicago Literary Archive. “The Chicago Literary Archive is an independent, open-source research guide to Chicago’s literary, printing, and publishing history from 1837 to today. Founded by Adam Morgan in 2021, the CLA is viewable and editable by anyone interested in Chicago literature. To add your own research, all you need is a WordPress account and an invitation.”

DigiPhiLit: A digital project for Philippine literature (Manila Times)

New-to-me, from Manila Times: DigiPhiLit: A digital project for Philippine literature. “TWO weeks ago, I wrote an article where I highlighted the importance of preserving sources, documents, books and old imprints. The existence of these should not be taken for granted, as in a nation such as the Philippines, which is prone to floods, typhoons, earthquakes and fires, these are exposed to irremediable loss. … Largely unnoticed is a praiseworthy initiative named DigiPhiLit.”

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!. “It’s that time again — the judges’ scores and comments are in, and we’ve selected the winners of our third annual public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1925! As you know, we asked game designers of all stripes to submit new creations based on works published in 1925 that entered the public domain in the US this year — and just as in the past two jams, people got very creative in terms of choosing source material and deciding what to do with it.”

Tech Xplore: Spotify tests audiobooks of classics including ‘Persuasion,’ ‘Frankenstein’

Tech Xplore: Spotify tests audiobooks of classics including ‘Persuasion,’ ‘Frankenstein’. “Streaming giant Spotify is extending its foray into audiobooks, dropping nine new public-domain classics narrated by celebrities including Hilary Swank and Forest Whitaker. The platform known best for its music has used podcasts to drive growth since 2019, and recently began bolstering its audiobook selection.”

Penn State News: Behrend professor leading effort to create a digitized ‘Frankenstein’

Penn State News: Behrend professor leading effort to create a digitized ‘Frankenstein’. “In 2017, [Elisa] Beshero-Bondar joined colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Maryland in an effort to digitally collate all five versions of ‘Frankenstein’: Shelley’s original draft, written in 1816 for a ghost story challenge at the home of the poet Lord Byron; the manuscript published in 1818; the ‘Thomas copy,’ in which Shelley had hand-written edits in the margins of the 1818 book; the 1823 version, which was published by Shelley’s father and was the first to recognize her as the author; and the 1831 edition, which is the version most familiar to anyone who read ‘Frankenstein’ in high school or college.” The entire manuscript collection is not online yet; it’s about 1/3 complete.

Library of Congress: Hispanic Audio Archive Rebrands as the PALABRA Archive and Releases New Recordings

Library of Congress: Hispanic Audio Archive Rebrands as the PALABRA Archive and Releases New Recordings. “With the Library’s Hispanic Heritage Month festivities underway, it is time to celebrate one of our institution’s most treasured Luso-Hispanic collections. This year, as is tradition during the heritage celebrations, the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress announces the release of fifty new audio recordings from the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape (AHLOT) for online streaming. The release makes available new material from this literary audio archive of Iberian, Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX poets and writers reading from their works.”

Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’ (Adam Matthew)

Adam Matthew: Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’. “Drawn from the holdings of the National Library of Scotland, AM Digital’s latest collection, Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive is an unparalleled resource for scholars and academics interested in the history of the book, literature and nineteenth-century history. From its inception in 1768, the John Murray publishing house worked with influential authors whose famed titles continue to shape literature to this day, including Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Herman Melville and Lord Byron.” If you’re not familiar with Adam Matthew, I’ll let you know it’s not free.

‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”