‘Couldn’t Believe How Unsafe It Was’: Kiss’ Roadies Blame Lax Covid Protocols for Guitar Tech’s Death (Rolling Stone)

Rolling Stone: ‘Couldn’t Believe How Unsafe It Was’: Kiss’ Roadies Blame Lax Covid Protocols for Guitar Tech’s Death. “In the wake of tragedy, members of the tour seem eager to place blame: Some of [Francis] Stueber’s fellow roadies point to what they perceived to be lax Covid-19 safety protocols as the culprit; while the band reveals that workers concealed sickness and even faked vaccine cards in some cases. Either way, as the pandemic continues to imperil the live-music business — and artists fight to get back on the road to work — situations like these beg the question: How much is enough when it comes to keeping bands on the road and their teams safe? ”

Back to the mosh pit: What it means for super-fans (BBC)

BBC: Back to the mosh pit: What it means for super-fans. “To be a fan is often described as an obsessive thing, a bit unhealthy. Those types who think they are destiny-bound to befriend their idols. The people who hang around on doorsteps. Fans who sob on YouTube. For most, though, it’s about private passions, the thrill of the chase, the joy of collecting, connecting and a sense of belonging to a tribe. It’s about knowing everything about the thing you love and wearing that as a badge, but it’s also about creating little habits and structures that enhance the everyday.”

Illinois News Bureau: Illinois researchers to digitally preserve history of live musical performances, including Krannert Center events

Illinois News Bureau: Illinois researchers to digitally preserve history of live musical performances, including Krannert Center events. “‘The Internet of Musical Events: Digital Scholarship, Community, and the Archiving of Performances,’ known as InterMusE, aims to preserve access to the record of historical live musical performances through digital archiving of concert ephemera such as programs and posters. It also will collect oral history interviews with concertgoers.”

Wired: Big Music Needs to Be Broken Up to Save the Industry

Wired: Big Music Needs to Be Broken Up to Save the Industry. “THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC has shattered the music industry. By taking away live music for what will likely be 18 months or more, Covid has ended the revenue stream that animated an entire music ecosystem. This is particularly true for independent artists with few other means of making a living in today’s industry. Musicians lost two-thirds of their typical income in 2020. Live music revenue fell 85 percent. The Save Our Stages bill, passed in December as part of the second round of pandemic relief, has offered a lifeline. But even after it’s again safe to see a live gig, the underlying driver of the music industry’s deep inequity will persist.”

Holiday Arts Guide: From Blenders to Brickman, music traditions continue online (TwinCities Pioneer Press)

TwinCities Pioneer Press: Holiday Arts Guide: From Blenders to Brickman, music traditions continue online. “Nearly all of this year’s holiday concerts are virtual, but many familiar faces both local (the Blenders, Lorie Line, the SPCO) and national (Jim Brickman, Trans-Siberian Orchestra) have planned online events to keep holiday traditions going during the pandemic. Here’s a look at what’s on tap.” These events are a mix of free and not-free.

‘I was there’: Promoter shares details of past concerts at Indiana Rock History database (IndyStar)

New-to-me, from IndyStar: ‘I was there’: Promoter shares details of past concerts at Indiana Rock History database. “[Steve] Sybesma played a large role in thousands of shows that happened in Indiana, thanks to his time as co-owner of concert company Sunshine Promotions from 1974 to 2000. As the ultimate live music insider, Sybesma is sharing event details that can’t be found anywhere else. Beyond the basics of a concert’s date, headlining performer and supporting acts, the Indiana Rock History project frequently discloses attendance figures, what artists were paid and how much money was collected in ticket sales.”

Jazz Lives in Clubs. The Pandemic Is Threatening Its Future. (New York Times)

New York Times: Jazz Lives in Clubs. The Pandemic Is Threatening Its Future.. “The concert world as a whole is in crisis, but perhaps no genre is as vulnerable as jazz, which depends on a fragile ecosystem of performance venues. In pre-pandemic New York, the genre’s creative and commercial center, young players still converged to hone their craft and veterans held court in prestigious rooms like the Village Vanguard and the Blue Note. It’s an economic and creative network that has sustained the genre for decades. But after suffering nearly six months of lost business, New York jazz venues have begun sounding the alarm that without significant government relief, they might not last much longer.”

JamBase: JamBase Launches Massive Live Video Archive

JamBase: JamBase Launches Massive Live Video Archive. “Today, JamBase is excited to announce the JamBase Live Video Archive (JBLVA), an ever-growing database featuring thousands of live music videos. The JBLVA allows visitors to filter videos in any number of ways, including by band, song, duration, year and videographer/channel to help you find just the right clip.”

People: Levi’s Hosts Free Nightly Concerts During Self Isolation Featuring Questlove, Brett Young and More

People: Levi’s Hosts Free Nightly Concerts During Self Isolation Featuring Questlove, Brett Young and More. “As millions across the country self-isolate amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Levi’s is doing its part to keep people motivated, energized and safe inside their homes with its new Instagram Live concert series. Each day, the brand is hosting special performances by A-list talent to give all those sheltering in place exactly what they need at the end of the day — a dance party.”

Concrete Playground: Sofa King Fest Is the New Website Curating the Best Music Live-Streams from Across the World

Concrete Playground: Sofa King Fest Is the New Website Curating the Best Music Live-Streams from Across the World. “To help raise money for some of those musicians out of work, a group of global volunteers has created Sofa King Fest. Dubbed an ’emergency response online music and arts benefit festival’, the website is a curation of all the best music live-streams happening around the world — all in one spot, all available to watch from the comfort of your sofa.”

OnMilwaukee: Where and how to stream virtual concerts during quarantine

OnMilwaukee: Where and how to stream virtual concerts during quarantine. “Artists across the globe have cranked up their creativity and are reaching fans in new ways, sometimes all while wearing pajamas. Despite self-isolation, their videos will make you feel more connected than ever before because, ultimately, we are all in this together. Now the important question: How do you find all of this amazing live music? We’ve got you covered!”

Travel+Leisure: Celebrities, Orchestras, and More Are Streaming Live Music to Your Living Room — Here’s How to Listen (Video)

Travel+Leisure: Celebrities, Orchestras, and More Are Streaming Live Music to Your Living Room — Here’s How to Listen (Video). ” As a response to the closure of various venues around the world, many museums, national parks, and even zoos are going virtual, giving those at home a chance to enjoy their services from the comfort of their pajamas. But if you’re looking for another, more musical way to tune out the wall-to-wall coronavirus coverage, we come bearing good news.”