SportBusiness: FIH and Nagra launch new Watch. Hockey streaming service

SportBusiness: FIH and Nagra launch new Watch. Hockey streaming service. Please note this is FIELD hockey, not ice hockey. “The International Hockey Federation (FIH) has launched a new fan engagement app which will stream live coverage of matches and aims to be the digital ‘home of hockey’ for fans, players and officials worldwide. Produced in association with content and multi-screen video company Nagra, ‘Watch.Hockey’ is available free of charge, on the App Store and on Google Play. The timing of the launch coincides with the gradual resumption of international hockey, with the Pro League re-starting on September 22.”

NME: Facebook clarify what October update means for artists on the platform

NME: Facebook clarify what October update means for artists on the platform. “A spokesperson for Facebook has clarified what an update to terms coming into effect in October mean for artists on the platform. The social networking site has previewed new terms and conditions that will be introduced on October 1, with music guidelines stating that users are not permitted to use videos to ‘create a listening experience’.”

New York Times: Chess (Yes, Chess) Is Now a Streaming Obsession

New York Times: Chess (Yes, Chess) Is Now a Streaming Obsession. “The coronavirus pandemic and stay-at-home orders have crowned a host of unlikely winners catering to bored audiences. But watching livestreams of chess games? Could one of the world’s oldest and most cerebral games really rebrand itself as a lively enough pastime to capture the interest of the masses on Twitch? Turns out, it already has.”

Heavy: Ronnie McNutt’s Friend Says Facebook Didn’t Do Enough to Stop Suicide Livestream

Heavy: Ronnie McNutt’s Friend Says Facebook Didn’t Do Enough to Stop Suicide Livestream . “Josh Steen, a friend of Ronnie McNutt, is speaking out about the tragic video showing McNutt’s death and the failure of social media platforms in removing it. On August 31, McNutt, 33, died by suicide and streamed his death on Facebook Live. In the days after his death, the video was shared on various social media platforms, especially TikTok, prompting many people to warn users about its presence. Now, Steen is sharing details about the circumstances surrounding his friend’s public death and says Facebook didn’t do enough to prevent McNutt’s death from being streamed online or to remove offending content about McNutt’s death in the days since.”

Alain Cocq: Facebook blocks incurably ill man from livestreaming death (BBC)

BBC: BBC: Alain Cocq: Facebook blocks incurably ill man from livestreaming death. “Facebook says it will block a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition from livestreaming his own death. Alain Cocq, 57, planned to broadcast his final days after starting to refuse food, drink and medicine on Saturday. President Emmanuel Macron had earlier denied his request for euthanasia.”
. “Facebook says it will block a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition from livestreaming his own death. Alain Cocq, 57, planned to broadcast his final days after starting to refuse food, drink and medicine on Saturday. President Emmanuel Macron had earlier denied his request for euthanasia.”

University of Iowa: First Annual Ray Bradbury Read-A-Thon

University of Iowa: First Annual Ray Bradbury Read-A-Thon. “On Saturday, August 22, 2020, the University of Iowa Libraries will partner with national organizations to present the first annual Ray Bradbury Read-A-Thon. During this four-hour online event, a diverse group of celebrities and Bradbury experts, including Peter Balestrieri, curator of science fiction and popular culture collections at the University of Iowa Libraries Special Collections & Archives, will present a virtual reading of Bradbury’s classic novel Fahrenheit 451 streamed over YouTube beginning at 3:30 pm CDT.” The event has already occurred but the stream is still available over YouTube. Also, it’s more like six hours.

Uncut and unedited: Livestreamers have become a key cog in the Louisville protests (USA Today)

USA Today: Uncut and unedited: Livestreamers have become a key cog in the Louisville protests. “Just before 7 p.m. May 28, Louisville entertainer Montez Jones was in a car on the way to an impromptu protest in the name of Breonna Taylor. He opened his Facebook page and hit ‘go live.’ Within hours, hundreds of people had joined him downtown – the crowd growing as word spread through texts, calls and shares of his livestream. Fast-forward three months, and the protests have continued, with people young and old calling for justice for the unarmed Black woman killed in March at the hands of police.”

Gizmodo: Google Is Upgrading Search to Make it Easier to Find Live Sports and TV Shows

Gizmodo: Google Is Upgrading Search to Make it Easier to Find Live Sports and TV Shows. “With a seemingly ever-increasing number of cable and streaming services, simply figuring out where to watch that one live event or show has become its own challenge. So in an effort to help cut down on the noise, Google is upgrading Google Search with some new features to help you find live sports, shows, and movies.”

Slate: Justice, Livestreamed

Slate: Justice, Livestreamed. “The defense lawyer sits in his office—with the defendant, wearing a mask, at a desk behind him—as he takes turns with the prosecutors in questioning the witness, screen-sharing documents at various intervals. This is what court looks like in many parts of the country these days, and in some states, it’s available on YouTube. If you tire of Alcalá’s virtual courtroom, you can jump over to elsewhere in Texas, where child welfare cases are being streamed. Or you could click to Wisconsin or Michigan, where defendants join Zoom via video from the county jails and judges breeze through preliminary hearings and dole out sentences for parole violations.”

Niagara Gazette: Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service goes online

Niagara Gazette: Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service goes online. “In 1987, Bob Sikorkski founded the Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service. It’s designed to give people who are blind, have low vision or have other print disabilities, the ability to hear books as well as local publications. On July 31, they took, their service online for streaming and podcasting. Previously, listeners would have to get a special radio to be able to listen in.” I checked in on the stream. It is not location-restricted and is free to listen to.

Motherboard: US Army Reinstates Twitch Commenters It Banned for Asking About War Crimes

Motherboard: US Army Reinstates Twitch Commenters It Banned for Asking About War Crimes. “After a pause from streaming, the U.S. Army esports team is returning to Twitch and reinstating accounts it had previously banned. ‘The U.S. Army eSports Team is reinstating access for accounts previously banned for harassing and degrading behavior on its Twitch stream,’ the Army told Motherboard in an email.”

Arizona State University: Zócalo Public Square, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County present ‘When Women Vote’ series

Arizona State University: Zócalo Public Square, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County present ‘When Women Vote’ series. “In commemoration of this year’s centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, Zócalo Public Square and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) will present a three-part livestreamed event that will highlight the past, present and future of women in protest, power and progress.”

MakeUseOf: How to Start Streaming on Twitch Using Streamlabs

MakeUseOf: How to Start Streaming on Twitch Using Streamlabs. “If you watch streamers on Twitch and would like to try it for yourself, you might be wondering where to start. And while there’s a lot that goes into streaming, almost anyone can get started with the basics. In this article, we show you how to start streaming using Streamlabs. We’ll also explain some of the considerations you’ll need to keep in mind.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Live-Streamed Game Collects Sounds To Help Train Home-Based Artificial Intelligence

Carnegie Mellon University: Live-Streamed Game Collects Sounds To Help Train Home-Based Artificial Intelligence . “From yawning to closing the fridge door, a lot of sounds occur within the home. Such sounds could be useful for home-based artificial intelligence applications, but training that AI requires a robust and diverse set of samples. A video game developed by Carnegie Mellon University researchers leverages live streaming to collect sound donations from players that will populate an open-source database.”

The Verge: People are watching a lot more Twitch during the pandemic

The Verge: People are watching a lot more Twitch during the pandemic. “Twitch viewership has been way up since the pandemic started. Viewership grew to 5 billion hours watched between April and June, which is a huge increase no matter how you look at it: it’s up more than 50 percent from the first quarter of 2020, and it’s up more than 60 percent over the same three months in 2019. The metrics come from the latest streaming industry report by StreamElements and Arsenal.gg.”