Open Data in U.S. States: An Untapped Resource (BSA TechPost)

BSA TechPost: Open Data in U.S. States: An Untapped Resource. “As the past few months have demonstrated, ensuring that the public has access to trustworthy and dependable open government data can be a matter of life and death. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists and policymakers have used open data to learn more about the virus and plan effective responses to it, examining everything from mobile phone mobility data to information about health system capacities. Our communities at large- from small business owners to K-12 schools, universities to sports programs- are relying on this information to make critical decisions about bringing people back into the office or sending kids back into the classroom this fall.”

The Texas Record: COVID-19 Health Screening Records

The Texas Record: COVID-19 Health Screening Records. “Since the start of the 2020 pandemic, many organizations have started collecting information on the people visiting their facilities: temperature checks, symptom reporting, test results, etc. If your local government or state agency has been screening people for COVID-19 symptoms, you’re probably wondering what to do with all those records. There is no one perfect record series for COVID-19 screening records, as the administrative and legal value will vary depending on who is conducting the screening, whether information is being collected on citizens or employees, and what specific questions are being asked.”

Colorado Hometown Weekly: Questions arise about Boulder coronavirus data

Colorado Hometown Weekly: Questions arise about Boulder coronavirus data. “New cases among county residents are reported by Boulder County Public Health about 4 p.m. every day. University of Colorado Boulder tracks the number of people who test positive at the campus Medical Services, county and non-county residents alike. New cases are posted in the morning, Tuesday through Saturday. But how the public health data from these two institutions line up — or don’t line up — is where things get murky, exposing inconsistencies and hiccups with how public agencies are reporting data during the pandemic.”

At risk of losing their home, health, and internet: 12 million Americans still waiting for unemployment benefits (NBC News)

NBC News: At risk of losing their home, health, and internet: 12 million Americans still waiting for unemployment benefits. “Six months into the pandemic, some laid-off workers find themselves waiting weeks or even months to receive their unemployment benefits. States blame antiquated technology and say their staffers can’t keep up with the continued surge of claims, while worker advocates say these are just excuses for mismanagement and a failure to prioritize funding for upgrades. As this plays out, an untold number of families are hanging on by a financial thread.”

The Hill: Exclusive: Internal documents show officials waved red flags before Trump’s Tulsa rally

The Hill: Exclusive: Internal documents show officials waved red flags before Trump’s Tulsa rally. “Oklahoma health officials raised red flags before President Trump’s indoor rally in June, warning there could be significant spikes of coronavirus cases and deaths from the event, according to internal state documents. Dozens of emails obtained by The Hill through a state freedom of information request reveal growing angst within the Oklahoma public health department in the days leading up to the June 20 rally.”

CNN: Trump indoor rally site fined $3,000 for violating state coronavirus guidelines

CNN: Trump indoor rally site fined $3,000 for violating state coronavirus guidelines. “The Nevada company that hosted an indoor campaign rally for President Donald Trump attended by thousands of people will face a fine of $3,000 for violating state coronavirus guidelines banning large gatherings.”

AP: In defiance of Nevada governor, Trump holds indoor rally

AP: In defiance of Nevada governor, Trump holds indoor rally. “Eager to project a sense of normalcy in imagery, Trump soaked up the raucous cheers inside a warehouse. Relatively few in the crowd wore masks, with one clear exception: Those in the stands directly behind Trump, whose images would end up on TV, were mandated to wear face coverings.”

State Archives of North Carolina: CLIR Recordings-at-Risk Grant to Digitize Senate Audio, 1993-2005

State Archives of North Carolina: CLIR Recordings-at-Risk Grant to Digitize Senate Audio, 1993-2005. “In May 2020, the State Archives of North Carolina received a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Recordings-at-Risk grant, made possible by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.* The project, titled Preserving and Providing Access to Legislative History: Senate Audio Digitization, will digitize 64 Dictaphone Veritrac tapes in the North Carolina Senate Daily Legislative Session Audio Recordings (SR.66.25) series. These tapes date from 1993 to 2005.”

DCist: People Are Rarely Cited For Large Social Gatherings In The D.C. Area

DCist: People Are Rarely Cited For Large Social Gatherings In The D.C. Area. “D.C., Maryland and Virginia all have ordinances in place that limit large gatherings and require people to wear masks during COVID-19. But according to health departments and police, enforcement of those gatherings has not been particularly punitive, with few area residents receiving fines or citations in connection with mass gatherings.”

AP: Politics slows flow of US virus funds to local public health

AP: Politics slows flow of US virus funds to local public health. “Since the pandemic began, Congress has set aside trillions of dollars to ease the crisis. A joint Kaiser Health News and Associated Press investigation finds that many communities with big outbreaks have spent little of that federal money on local public health departments for work such as testing and contact tracing. Others, like in Minnesota, were slow to do so.”

WCSC: Charleston to consider dropping warning for violating face covering ordinance

WCSC: Charleston to consider dropping warning for violating face covering ordinance. ” After Tuesday’s Charleston City Council meeting, anyone stopped on the street without a face covering could be hit with a fine without a warning. City Council will consider removing the warning, which would mean the first violation would result in a $100 fine.”

Yankee Institute Statement: Yankee Institute Shines Light on Government with New Database (Yankee Institute for Public Policy)

Yankee Institute for Public Policy: Yankee Institute Statement: Yankee Institute Shines Light on Government with New Database. “Our new database is the first of its kind. It houses every state, municipal, and regional collective bargaining agreement in Connecticut, ensuring both that union members can access their own contracts — and that everyone can access the rules that govern their schools, police departments, towns, and state.”

‘This is no longer a debate’: Florida sheriff bans deputies, visitors from wearing masks (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘This is no longer a debate’: Florida sheriff bans deputies, visitors from wearing masks. “On Tuesday, as Florida set a daily record for covid-19 deaths, Marion County Sheriff Billy Woods prohibited his deputies from wearing masks at work. His order, which also applies to visitors to the sheriff’s office, carves out an exception for officers in some locations, including hospitals, and when dealing with people who are high-risk or suspected of having the novel coronavirus. In an email to the sheriff’s department shared with The Washington Post, Woods disputed the idea that masks are a consensus approach to battling the pandemic.”

New York Times: Wear Your Mask. Please. No, Not on Your Chin.

New York Times: Wear Your Mask. Please. No, Not on Your Chin.. “Rachel Kobylas longs for the days when her job as a code enforcement officer in the laid-back Florida town of Key West meant that she drove around making sure people turned off noisy power tools after 7 p.m. She went after overgrown grass, unpermitted construction and boats illegally parked on the street. That all changed this summer, when her main challenge became convincing the tourists, bartenders, T-shirt shop sales clerks and fishermen who flock along Key West’s sweltering streets in shorts and flip-flops that they should also be wearing a mask.”