NPR: Russian Influence Campaign Sought To Exploit Americans’ Trust In Local News

NPR: Russian Influence Campaign Sought To Exploit Americans’ Trust In Local News. “Russia’s information attack against the United States during the 2016 election cycle sought to take advantage of the greater trust that Americans tend to place in local news. The information operatives who worked out of the Internet Research Agency in St. Petersburg did not stop at posing as American social media users or spreading false information from purported news sources, according to new details. They also created a number of Twitter accounts that posed as sources for Americans’ hometown headlines.”

Digital literacy project sets an ambitious goal: Wikipedia pages for 1,000 local newspapers (Poynter)

Poynter: Digital literacy project sets an ambitious goal: Wikipedia pages for 1,000 local newspapers. “When readers search for a publication on Google, an ‘info box’ populated by Wikipedia pops up on the right side of the search results with basic information like the publication’s founding date, circulation size and editor. But that’s not the case for thousands of smaller local papers that don’t have a Wikipedia page. Mike Caulfield, director of blended and networked learning at Washington State University Vancouver, plans to work with students around the U.S. to create pages and info boxes for the local newspapers lacking them.”

Robert Feder: Block Club Chicago acquires archive of DNAinfo

Robert Feder: Block Club Chicago acquires archive of DNAinfo. “Block Club Chicago, the new subscription-based neighborhood news service, has picked up the assets of DNAinfo, including the extensive archive of stories created by the former hyperlocal news sites in Chicago and New York. It’s quite a coup for Block Club Chicago, which acquired the treasure trove Thursday as a gift from New York Public Radio WNYC. The station obtained the assets from DNAinfo in February as part of a larger deal that included Gothamist and associated sites.”

Poynter: New data tracks how fast news deserts are spreading

Poynter: New data tracks how fast news deserts are spreading. “News deserts are ominous to democracy, but how many there are and how fast they’re spreading has been a mystery — until now: Coverage of at least 900 communities across the nation has gone dry since 2004, preliminary new data shows.”

Nieman Lab: How much of what local TV stations post to Facebook is actually local? For many, right around half

Nieman Lab: How much of what local TV stations post to Facebook is actually local? For many, right around half. “If your only source of news is your local TV news station on Facebook, will your news and information needs around what’s going on in your community be met? The forecast isn’t good.”

Nieman Lab: Facebook’s News Feed changes appear to be hurting — not helping — local news

Nieman Lab: Facebook’s News Feed changes appear to be hurting — not helping — local news. “More meaningful interactions! More love for local news! These were supposed to be some of the positive changes associated with the algorithm change Facebook announced early this year. But so far the local news love is lacking: Pete Brown, senior research fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, crunched the numbers and found that ’11 out of 13 regional metros averaged fewer interactions per post in the nine weeks following the pro-local algorithm change than in the two years before.’ And the 13 regional metros that Brown looked at? They’re the papers that are participating in Facebook’s Local News Subscription Accelerator.”

Gizmodo: How to Use Social Networks to Find Out What’s Going On in Your Neighborhood

Gizmodo: How to Use Social Networks to Find Out What’s Going On in Your Neighborhood. “The web connects us to people on the other side of the globe in an instant, but sometimes you just want to know what’s happening down the street. Here’s how to use your social networks and more to get the local lowdown and stay in the loop with what’s going on nearby, whether that’s snowstorms or street parties.”