News@Northeastern: Letters Of Ignatius Sancho Offer Window To Life Of Black Man In 18th-century London

News@Northeastern: Letters Of Ignatius Sancho Offer Window To Life Of Black Man In 18th-century London. “Led by Northeastern professors Nicole Aljoe and Olly Ayers along with four undergraduate research assistants, the Ignatius Sancho’s London project pulls data from digital and physical archives of Sancho’s letters and maps them, creating an interactive resource to help the public understand Black life in 18th-century England.”

Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s (Brixton Buzz)

Brixton Buzz (no relation): Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s. “Telling the story of the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting community from the 1970s to the early 1980s, the website documents a seemingly disparate group of gay men and their attempts to live together communally. Containing written text, photographs, podcasts, videos and art works, the Revolting Gays website will go live on June 24th this year.”

Children & Young People Now: Young People Lead Research Into Impact Of Knife Images On Social Media

Children & Young People Now: Young People Lead Research Into Impact Of Knife Images On Social Media. “The move comes as part of a debate over police forces posting pictures of seized weapons on social media amid concerns that it furthers, rather than lessens, fear amongst young people. The Young People’s Action Group has also expressed concern that the posts containing images of knives are used by young people to learn what weapons are being carried in specific areas of London. This can lead to young people carrying more dangerous weapons and knives to protect themselves, they say.”

The Guardian: Southern cancels London Victoria trains for two weeks over Covid

The Guardian: Southern cancels London Victoria trains for two weeks over Covid. “Southern has cancelled trains to and from London Victoria for two weeks as a result of pandemic-related staff shortages. Disruption to rail services has been worsening over the Christmas period while industrial action continues. Southern has now announced that none of its trains will run to or from London Victoria until 10 January owing to ‘coronavirus isolation and sickness’.”

RTE: London declares ‘major incident’ to help Covid-hit hospitals

RTE: London declares ‘major incident’ to help Covid-hit hospitals. “London Mayor Sadiq Khan has declared a “major incident” to help the city’s hospitals cope with a surge in Covid-19 cases caused by the fast-spreading Omicron coronavirus variant. Mr Khan took the step, which allows for closer coordination between different public agencies, after Britain reported the largest 24-hour increase in the number of new cases yesterday since the pandemic began.”

BBC: London transport staff warned of anti-mask posters with razor blades

BBC: London transport staff warned of anti-mask posters with razor blades. “London transport staff have been warned after anti-mask posters with razor blades on the back were found, a union has said. The Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union said it had raised the issue of ‘Masks Don’t Work’ posters with Transport for London (TfL). TfL said it was not aware of any incidents involving blades but had given advice to its workers. A similar poster was found in Cardiff where a woman was injured removing it.”

Today’s Wills & Probate: Archaeologists to digitise burial records following HS2 excavation

Today’s Wills & Probate: Archaeologists to digitise burial records following HS2 excavation. “Archaeologists working on the HS2 rail link are looking for volunteers to help digitise the burial records of 57,639 Londoners who lived in the city in the 18th and 19th century. The information relates to St James’s Burial Ground near Euston station, where more than 31,000 burials were excavated as part of HS2’s archaeology work between 2018 and 2019.”

Beyond the Pandemic: London’s financial hub seeks a rebirth (ABC News)

ABC News: Beyond the Pandemic: London’s financial hub seeks a rebirth. “Plagues, fires, war — London has survived them all. But it has never had a year like this. The coronavirus has killed more than 15,000 Londoners and shaken the foundations of one of the world’s great cities. As a fast-moving mass vaccination campaign holds the promise of reopening, The Associated Press looks at the pandemic’s impact on London’s people and institutions and asks what the future might hold.”

At 172 Years Old, London’s Regent Street Cinema is Rallying to Survive: ‘We’re Independent. We Can Do This.’ (Variety)

Variety: At 172 Years Old, London’s Regent Street Cinema is Rallying to Survive: ‘We’re Independent. We Can Do This.’. “Located at 307 Regent Street, a short distance from the bustle of Oxford Street’s shopping district, the theater has long been considered the birthplace of British Cinema. Though it was opened in 1848 to host live stage productions, it became the first U.K. venue to screen moving images with a short movie by the Lumiere brothers in 1896, and went on to serve as a cinema until 1980. The University of Westminster, on whose land the Grade II-listed building resides, reopened it as a repertory cinema in 2015 after a three-year restoration project at the cost of £6.1 million ($7.9 million).”

TimeOut: London’s first public art walk The Line goes online

TimeOut: London’s first public art walk The Line goes online. “There is a now new way to walk the line without ever getting lost. To celebrate its fifth birthday, mark International Sculpture Day and cope with the obvious barrier of the lockdown, The Line is going online. In collaboration with children’s arts charity House of Fairy Tales, it has launched a new interactive map which will guide you through each art installation. Click on the numbered dots and you’ll be given the story behind sculptures like Alex Chinneck’s immense 35-metre-tall latticed steelwork ‘A Bullet from a Shooting Star’ or Laura Ford’s ’Bird Boy’, a lonely figure of a lost child in a bird costume that stands on the edge of a pontoon in the Royal Docks.”

Nursing Clio: Plague in the Age of Twitter

Nursing Clio: Plague in the Age of Twitter. “As someone who works mostly on early modern England, my thoughts these days have been on what life might have been like during plague outbreaks. London did not have an easy go of things in the early seventeenth century. The bubonic plague had returned with a vengeance and the rapidly growing city was hit by outbreak after outbreak. 1592, 1603, 1625, 1630, 1636, 1637 — summer after summer, theaters closed, streets emptied, and those who could fled to the country. And as bad as these years were, they were all prologue to the worst of it. In 1665, the city was rocked by a final major outbreak, known later as simply the Great Plague.”