The Star (Malaysia): Malaysian gallery preserves art collection for 1,000 years in an Arctic vault

The Star (Malaysia): Malaysian gallery preserves art collection for 1,000 years in an Arctic vault. “It might be hard to imagine what the world will be like in a thousand years, but here’s something we do know now: a number of artworks from the private collection of Artemis Art’s co-founders S. Jamal Al-Idrus and U.C. Loh will be safe and sound in a repository in Svalbard, Norway. Artemis Art has signed up to be a part of the Arctic World Archive (AWA), a safe repository for world memory and collections.”

The End Of An Archive: NCAR Powers Off HPSS (UCAR)

University Corporation for Atmospheric Research: The End Of An Archive: NCAR Powers Off HPSS. “After more than 10 years in service as a long-term repository for curated data archives and modeling data, NCAR [National Center for Atmospheric Research]’s High-Performance Storage System (HPSS) was officially retired on October 1, 2021. The tape archive made its debut in March 2011 as a follow-on to the 25-year-old NCAR Mass Storage System (MSS). During the transition from MSS, some 70 million files – approximately 12 petabytes of data – were migrated into HPSS. At its peak in early 2020, the volume of data archived in HPSS had grown to more than 93 petabytes and 300 million files.”

Olympic .org: Catherine Freeman’s Golden Olympic Moment To Last Thousands Of Years With New Technology

Olympic .org: Catherine Freeman’s Golden Olympic Moment To Last Thousands Of Years With New Technology. “To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Olympic Games Sydney 2000, the famous white exterior sails of the Sydney Opera House are becoming an enormous movie screen, showing Australian Catherine Freeman’s 400-metre gold medal win on 25 September 2000. She ran her final in 49.11 seconds, becoming the first Aboriginal athlete to win gold in an individual event at the Olympic Games. The cinematic event celebrates not only Freeman’s historic achievement, but also its audiovisual preservation for future generations on an innovative, sustainable, long-term storage technology called ‘synthetic DNA’.”

Arizona State University: Storing information and designing uncrackable codes with DNA

Arizona State University: Storing information and designing uncrackable codes with DNA. “For billions of years, nature has used DNA like a molecular bank vault: a place to store her most coveted secrets — the design blueprints essential to life. Now, researchers at ASU’s Biodesign Institute are exploring the unique information-carrying capacities of DNA, hoping to produce microscopic forms whose ability to encrypt, store and retrieve information rival those of the silicon-based semiconductor memories found in most computers.”

The Hustle: The company that wants to preserve our data for 500+ years

The Hustle: The company that wants to preserve our data for 500+ years . “Deep in the Norweigan arctic, on the ice-encrusted island of Spitsbergen, life stands still. The surrounding lands of the Svalbard archipelago are sparse and desolate. It is a place where there is a 1:10 polar bear to human ratio, where the sun doesn’t rise for 4 months per year, and the northern lights dance across the sky. But on the side of a mountain in Spitsbergen, there’s an abandoned coal mine. And inside — some 250 meters below the Earth’s surface — you’ll find a steel vault that contains an archive of film encoded with hundreds of thousands of open-source projects from around the world.”

News .com .au: Microsoft storing world’s open source GitHub code in Norwegian archive vault for the next millennium

News .com .au: Microsoft storing world’s open source GitHub code in Norwegian archive vault for the next millennium. “The secrets of Australia’s unique biodiversity and the collected history of our national library are among the digital treasures being kept in a vault 250 metres underground in an abandoned Norwegian coal mine. The GitHub Arctic Vault program is part of the now Microsoft-owned code repository GitHub, where programmers can share code with others to check for bugs or for them to implement in their own programs.”

Techspot: Microsoft successfully archives Warner Bros. ‘Superman’ movie on a piece of glass

Techspot: Microsoft successfully archives Warner Bros. ‘Superman’ movie on a piece of glass. “Data storage and archiving technologies are areas of particular interest for companies like Warner Bros., where a significant chunk of the world’s entertainment media is produced and archived. To help with preserving this film and television content, Warner Bros. and Microsoft collaborated to give a first proof of concept test for Project Silica, a Microsoft Research project that uses laser optics and AI to store data in quartz glass.”

Phys .org: Preserving the contents of the New York Public Library in a teaspoon of protein, without energy, for millions of years

Phys .org: Preserving the contents of the New York Public Library in a teaspoon of protein, without energy, for millions of years. “As the data boom continues to boom, more and more information gets filed in less and less space. Even the cloud—whose name promises opaque, endless space—will eventually run out of space, can’t thwart all hackers, and gobbles up energy. Now, a new way to store information could stably house data for millions of years, lives outside the hackable internet, and, once written, uses no energy. All you need is a chemist, some cheap molecules, and your precious information.”

BusinessWire: AWS Announces General Availability of Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive—the Lowest Cost Storage in the Cloud (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: AWS Announces General Availability of Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive—the Lowest Cost Storage in the Cloud (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, Amazon Web Services, Inc. (AWS), an Amazon.com company (NASDAQ: AMZN), announced the general availability of Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive, a new storage class that provides secure, durable object storage for long-term retention of data that is rarely accessed. At just $0.00099 per GB-month (less than one-tenth of one cent, or $1 per TB-month), S3 Glacier Deep Archive offers the lowest cost storage in the cloud, at prices significantly lower than storing and maintaining data in on-premises magnetic tape libraries or archiving data off-site.”

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History. “If you were to build your own time capsule, what would you want people—or alien beings—a million years from now to know about us? That we were loving, or warmongering, or dopes strung out on memes and viral videos? That we flew to the moon and made great art, ate Cinnabons (that we measured at 880 astonishing calories), and committed atrocities? How could you begin to represent these times, as lived by nearly 8 billion people? And what would give you, of all people, the right to tell the story? After these questions would come another wave of more logistical ones. Assuming the capsule was found, how would it be translated into the language of the future, whatever that language might be? And what materials could be employed that might last that long? And how could you lead a future […]

Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive. “In the far north of Norway, near the Arctic Circle, experts at the National Library of Norway’s (NLN) secure storage facility are in the process of implementing an astonishing plan. They aim to digitize everything ever published in Norway: books, newspapers, manuscripts, posters, photos, movies, broadcasts, and maps, as well as all websites on the Norwegian .no domain.”

I Programmer: Amazon Glacier Select Analyzes Archived Data

I Programmer: Amazon Glacier Select Analyzes Archived Data. “Amazon Glacier, which we reported when it was announced in 2012, is intended for data archiving and online backup, with storage costs of as little as $0.01 per gigabyte per month. It is optimized for infrequently accessed data where a retrieval time of several hours is suitable. Glacier Select, The new tool, announced at AWS re:Invent 2017, can be used to run queries directly on data stored in Glacier, retrieving only the data you need out of your archives to use for analytics.”

BusinessWire: Twist Bioscience and Collaborators Microsoft, University of Washington Preserve Archive-Quality Audio Recordings for UNESCO’s Memory of the World Collection (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Twist Bioscience and Collaborators Microsoft, University of Washington Preserve Archive-Quality Audio Recordings for UNESCO’s Memory of the World Collection (PRESS RELEASE). “Twist Bioscience, a company accelerating science and innovation through rapid, high-quality DNA synthesis, today announced that, working with Microsoft and University of Washington researchers, they have successfully stored archival-quality audio recordings of two important music performances from the archives of the world-renowned Montreux Jazz Festival. These selections are encoded and stored in nature’s preferred storage medium, DNA, for the first time. These tiny specks of DNA will preserve a part of UNESCO’s Memory of the World Archive, where valuable cultural heritage collections are recorded. This is the first time DNA has been used as a long-term archival-quality storage medium.”