The Getty Iris: Half a Million Records on Early 20th-Century German Art Market Added to Getty Provenance Index

The Getty Iris: Half a Million Records on Early 20th-Century German Art Market Added to Getty Provenance Index. “After four years of work, the Getty Provenance Index® has greatly expanded its database of German art sales catalogs, adding nearly 570,000 records of artwork sales for the years 1900 to 1929. This expansion, adding to existing records for the years 1930 to 1945, gives researchers in provenance and the art market unprecedented information on auction sales in Germany and Austria during the volatile years of the early twentieth century, including the periods of World War I, the Weimar Republic, and the years of politically sanctioned Nazi looting prior to and during World War II.”

BBC: Antiquities looted in Syria and Iraq are sold on Facebook

BBC: Antiquities looted in Syria and Iraq are sold on Facebook. “Facebook is being used by networks of traffickers to buy and sell looted antiquities, the BBC has learned. Private groups also discuss how to illegally excavate ancient tombs, according to research by academics. Facebook says it has removed 49 groups following the BBC’s investigation.”

Bloomberg: If You Steal It, the Art Vigilante Will Find You

Bloomberg: If You Steal It, the Art Vigilante Will Find You. “For days, Christos Tsirogiannis had been hitting refresh on his laptop, waiting for a chance to snatch ancient artifacts from one of the world’s biggest auctioneers. At the dining room table of his tidy house on a quiet street in Cambridge, England, the 45-year-old archaeologist was stalking Christie’s website, where the catalog for an upcoming antiquities auction in New York would soon be posted. It was important to his vigilante mission that he see the lots quickly. Tsirogiannis had work to do to repeat previous exploits in which he’d cost Christie’s and rivals Sotheby’s and Bonhams millions of dollars in sales—and the sale was in less than a month.”

Daily Sabah: New database on Nazi-looted art findings shows first results

Daily Sabah: New database on Nazi-looted art findings shows first results. “Art lovers will now be able to learn about one of the largest cases of Nazi-looted art in history after a team of researchers on Wednesday launched a website with their findings about the art collection of legendary German-Jewish publisher Rudolf Mosse….German institutions are working with the descendents of former Nazi victims through the project. The Mosse collection – with its thousands of paintings, sculptures, objects, books and antiquities – is one of the largest cases of Nazi-looted art.”

The Art Newspaper: Scotland Yard joins global crackdown on looted pharaonic antiquities

The Art Newspaper: Scotland Yard joins global crackdown on looted pharaonic antiquities. “Scotland Yard is working with the British Museum and the governments of Egypt and Sudan to tackle the looting of pharaonic antiquities. The plan is to create a publicly available database of 80,000 objects that have been identified as having passed through the trade or have been in private collections since 1970, the year of the Unesco convention on cultural property. The scheme is being funded with a £1m grant from the British government’s Cultural Protection Fund, administered by the British Council.”

The Art Newspaper: Germany launches internet portal to fight art trafficking

The Art Newspaper: Germany launches internet portal to fight art trafficking. “The German government has launched a new internet portal providing information relevant to the Cultural Property Protection Law that came into force last year, and aims to tackle illegal trafficking in looted antiquities and to protect German national heritage. The new site offers information on the German cultural property regulations for collectors, artists, museums and archives, as well as on national regulations in 60 further countries including Iraq, Afghanistan, China and Egypt. It also includes a database of German cultural property that is banned from sale abroad.”