Bloomberg: Herd Immunity May Be Developing in Mumbai’s Poorest Areas

Bloomberg: Herd Immunity May Be Developing in Mumbai’s Poorest Areas. “Around six in ten people living in some of India’s biggest slums have antibodies for the novel coronavirus indicating they’ve recovered from infection, in what could be one of the highest population immunity levels known worldwide. The findings, from a July serological survey of 6,936 people across three suburbs in India’s financial center of Mumbai, may explain why a steep drop in infections is being seen among the closely-packed population, despite new cases accelerating overall in the hard-hit country.”

Study: Crowdsourced data could help map urban food deserts (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: Study: Crowdsourced data could help map urban food deserts. “In a feasibility study published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health, scholars found that the methods used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify areas with low access to healthy food are often outdated and narrow in scope. Their findings indicate that crowdsourced information gathered from mobile apps such as Yelp could help provide more accurate real-time representation of food deserts in impoverished communities.”

Phys .org: Wikipedia, a source of information on natural disasters biased towards rich countries

Phys .org: Wikipedia, a source of information on natural disasters biased towards rich countries. “As a source of information related to natural disasters, the authors show that on Wikipedia, there is a greater tendency to cover events in wealthy countries than in poor countries. By performing careful, large-scale analysis of automatic content, ‘we show how flood coverage in Wikipedia leans towards wealthy, English-speaking countries, particularly the USA and Canada,’ they claim in their work. ‘We also note that the coverage of flooding in low-income countries and in countries in South America, is substantially less than the coverage of flooding in middle-income countries,’ they add.”

National Institutes of Health: NIH-funded scientists put socioeconomic data on the map

National Institutes of Health: NIH-funded scientists put socioeconomic data on the map. “The Neighborhood Atlas…, a new tool to help researchers visualize socioeconomic data at the community level is now available. This online platform allows for easily ranking and mapping neighborhoods according to socioeconomic disadvantage. Seeing a neighborhood’s socioeconomic measures, such as income, education, employment and housing quality, may provide clues to the effects of those factors on overall health, and could inform health resources policy and social interventions.”

Reuters: U.S. says internet use rises as more low income people go online

Reuters: U.S. says internet use rises as more low income people go online. “Among Americans living in households with family incomes below $25,000 per year, the survey found internet use increased to 62 percent in 2017 from 57 percent in 2015, while households earning $100,000 or more showed no change at 86 percent.”

New York Times: In 83 Million Eviction Records, a Sweeping and Intimate New Look at Housing in America

New York Times: In 83 Million Eviction Records, a Sweeping and Intimate New Look at Housing in America. “Two years ago, Mr. [Matthew] Desmond turned eviction into a national topic of conversation with ‘Evicted,’ a book that chronicled how poor families who lost their homes in Milwaukee sank ever deeper into poverty…. But for all the attention the problem began to draw, even Mr. Desmond could not say how widespread it was. Surveys of renters have tried to gauge displacement, but there is no government data tracking all eviction cases in America. Now that Mr. Desmond has been mining court records across the country to build a database of millions of evictions, it’s clear even in his incomplete national picture that they are more rampant in many places than what he saw in Milwaukee.”

International Labour Organization: ILO launches online access to legal research and training for developing countries

International Labour Organization: ILO launches online access to legal research and training for developing countries. “The ILO and a group of academic partners have launched a programme to provide free or inexpensive access to legal information and training to promote research in low- and middle income countries and help strengthen the rule of law. The programme, known as GOALI (Global Online Access to Legal Information) will give users in more than 115 developing countries access to a wide range of essential legal information for their work and studies that they would not normally be able to obtain.”

The New School: SGPIA Research Finds ‘Digital Divide’ in Google Street View of Environmental Issues, Slums

The New School: SGPIA Research Finds ‘Digital Divide’ in Google Street View of Environmental Issues, Slums. “For years, Arroyo Sarandí, a stream that snakes through the working class suburb of Avellaneda in Buenos Aires, has fallen victim to industrial use. Pollution and trash have caused serious flooding and health issues for the people living in villas misérias, or slums, along the river banks. But you wouldn’t know any of that by looking at Google Street View of Avellaneda: Neither the slums nor the environmental issues impacting it appear there.”