Politico: Trump fights in court to block pandemic food aid for lowest-income Americans

Politico: Trump fights in court to block pandemic food aid for lowest-income Americans. “The Trump administration is fighting in federal court to block states from giving billions of dollars in emergency food stamps to the lowest-income Americans during the coronavirus crisis. Residents of Pennsylvania and California have sued President Donald Trump’s Agriculture Department over a policy that has kept roughly 40 percent of households who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program from receiving any emergency benefits during the pandemic.”

New York Times: 8 Million Have Slipped Into Poverty Since May as Federal Aid Has Dried Up

New York Times: 8 Million Have Slipped Into Poverty Since May as Federal Aid Has Dried Up. “The number of poor people has grown by eight million since May, according to researchers at Columbia University, after falling by four million at the pandemic’s start as a result of an $2 trillion emergency package known as the Cares Act.”

Futurity: Utility Shut-offs, Evictions More Likely For Households Of Color

Futurity: Utility Shut-offs, Evictions More Likely For Households Of Color. “Researchers from the Indiana University O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs surveyed more than 1,800 Americans at or below 200% of the federal poverty line. The survey, which professors Sanya Carley and David Konisky conducted, is the second wave of the ‘Survey of Household Energy Insecurity in Time of COVID.’ In June they released the first batch of data, which both highlighted and foreshadowed significant problems with vulnerable populations’ ability to pay utility bills, put food on their tables, and remain in their homes.”

Poynter: 6 closer looks into the pandemic’s impact on minorities and the poor

Poynter: 6 closer looks into the pandemic’s impact on minorities and the poor. “It’s well-established that Black residents and Hispanic residents are roughly 2.5 times more likely to get the virus than white residents, more likely to die from it — and that the disparities vary significantly from state to state and county to county. Some of the more detailed coronavirus reporting now focuses on subsets of Black and Hispanic residents, other minority groups and particular populations of the poor. Here are six stories that caught our eye over the last several weeks, and nearly all of them can be reported in virtually any community.”

Thousand Oaks Acorn: Volunteers break down barriers to learning from home

Thousand Oaks Acorn: Volunteers break down barriers to learning from home. “Making it clear she was asking as a private individual and not as an employee of the school district, Conejo Valley Unified Assistant Superintendent Lisa Miller took to social media seeking volunteers to build frames to drape a sheet over as a way to provide families with privacy during online instruction. The recruitment effort started after Miller, who oversees programs to help marginalized and high-need students, learned from the Latino advocacy organization Adelante Conejo Communidad that some students would not join their required Zoom classes because of what the computer cameras revealed of their home environments.”

Covid-19: Hundreds protest against localised Madrid lockdowns (BBC)

BBC: Covid-19: Hundreds protest against localised Madrid lockdowns. “Hundreds of residents in some poorer areas of the Spanish capital Madrid have protested against what they call discrimination ahead of new lockdown measures to stem a rise in Covid-19. The curbs on movement and gatherings start on Monday and affect 850,000 people, many in areas of lower income and with higher immigrant populations.”

Georgia Tech: Google Funds Study of How Vulnerable Populations Seek Pandemic Info

Georgia Tech: Google Funds Study of How Vulnerable Populations Seek Pandemic Info. “Georgia Tech will receive $155,000 from Google’s Covid-19 AI for Social Good program to investigate patterns and impact of pandemic information-seeking amongst vulnerable populations, such as older adults, low-income households, and Black and Hispanic adults. These populations have experienced disproportionately high rates of Covid-19-related death, severe sickness, and life disruptions like job loss.”

The latest crisis: Low-income students are dropping out of college this fall in alarming numbers (Washington Post)

Washington Post: The latest crisis: Low-income students are dropping out of college this fall in alarming numbers. “In August, Paige McConnell became the first in her family to go to college — and the first to drop out. McConnell, 18, could not make online classes work. She doesn’t have WiFi at her rural home in Crossville, Tenn. The local library turned her away, not wanting anyone sitting around during the pandemic. She spent hours in a McDonald’s parking lot using the fast-food chain’s Internet, but she kept getting kicked off her college’s virtual classes because the network wasn’t ‘safe.’ Two weeks after starting at Roane State Community College, she gave up.”

Half of households in 4 largest US cities report financial problems due to pandemic: POLL (ABC News)

ABC News: Half of households in 4 largest US cities report financial problems due to pandemic: POLL. “Americans already enduring the most frayed financial safety nets now find themselves on the fault lines exacerbated by the novel coronavirus. New polling reveals the strain born by families caught in the crosshairs of several issues converging on the country: COVID-19 and systemic racial, socioeconomic and health inequality.”

BuzzFeed News: At 10, Kyle Can No Longer Imagine What He Wants To Be When He Grows Up

BuzzFeed News: At 10, Kyle Can No Longer Imagine What He Wants To Be When He Grows Up. “For Kyle Lyons, parts of childhood are fading into memory as he learns to cope with an uncertain future. His parents fear what the pandemic is doing to him — and his Bronx neighborhood, one of the poorest in the country.”

CNET: Phones for low-income users hacked before they’re turned on, research finds

CNET: Phones for low-income users hacked before they’re turned on, research finds. “Adware isn’t a problem just for [Rameez] Anwar and other users who have the same phone model, made by American Network Solutions. Because the phones and their service plans were subsidized by a US program, taxpayers were funding the data that was used to display the promotional campaigns. On top of that, the adware prevented the phones doing their intended job: keeping low-income people connected to vital services via phone and internet.”

Debt, eviction and hunger: Millions fall back into crisis as stimulus and safety nets vanish (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Debt, eviction and hunger: Millions fall back into crisis as stimulus and safety nets vanish. “Major recessions are especially fraught for low-income earners, whose finances can veer from tenuous to dire with one missed paycheck. But as the economy cratered this spring, economists and poverty experts were mildly surprised to discover that the torrent of government support that followed — particularly the $600 a week in expanded unemployment benefits and one-time $1,200 stimulus checks — likely lowered the overall poverty rate. In fact, 17 million people would have dropped below the poverty line without the $500 billion in direct intervention for American families, said Zach Parolin, a researcher at Columbia University. Now, data show, those gains are eroding as federal inaction deprives Americans on the financial margins of additional support.”

India coronavirus: ‘More than half of Mumbai slum-dwellers had Covid-19’ (BBC)

BBC: India coronavirus: ‘More than half of Mumbai slum-dwellers had Covid-19’. “More than half the residents of slums in three areas in India’s commercial capital, Mumbai, tested positive for antibodies to the coronavirus, a new survey has found. Only 16% of people living outside slums in the same areas were found to be exposed to the infection. The results are from random testing of some 7,000 people in three densely-packed areas in early July.”