New York Times: Covid-19 Patient Gets Double Lung Transplant, Offering Hope for Others

New York Times: Covid-19 Patient Gets Double Lung Transplant, Offering Hope for Others. “A young woman whose lungs were destroyed by the coronavirus received a double lung transplant last week at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, the hospital reported on Thursday, the first known lung transplant in the United States for Covid-19.”

Washington Post: More evidence emerges on why covid-19 is so much worse than the flu

Washington Post: More evidence emerges on why covid-19 is so much worse than the flu. “Researchers who examined the lungs of patients killed by covid-19 found evidence that it attacks the lining of blood vessels there, a critical difference from the lungs of people who died of the flu, according to a report published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Critical parts of the lungs of patients infected with the novel coronavirus also suffered many microscopic blood clots and appeared to respond to the attack by growing tiny new blood vessels, the researchers reported.”

Princeton University: AI tool gives doctors a new look at the lungs in treating COVID-19

Princeton University: AI tool gives doctors a new look at the lungs in treating COVID-19. “Spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic, Princeton researchers have developed a diagnostic tool to analyze chest X-rays for patterns in diseased lungs. The new tool could give doctors valuable information about a patient’s condition, quickly and cheaply, at the point of care.”

BBC: The groundbreaking way to search lungs for signs of Covid-19

BBC: The groundbreaking way to search lungs for signs of Covid-19. “When Covid-19 was at its height in China, doctors in the city of Wuhan were able to use artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to scan the lungs of thousands of patients. The algorithm in question, developed by Axial AI, analyses CT imagery in seconds. It declares, for example, whether a patient has a high risk of viral pneumonia from coronavirus or not.”

Vancouver Sun: Vancouver radiologists and UBC students build database of COVID-19-affected lung images

Vancouver Sun: Vancouver radiologists and UBC students build database of COVID-19-affected lung images. “Most COVID-19 patients experience mild symptoms and recover within a week or two without treatment. But for those with moderate to even fatal cases, there is still a lot unknown about how the virus progresses. Two Vancouver radiologists are working with researchers and students at the University of B.C. to sort thousands of CT scans and chest x-ray images from COVID-19 patients that all show opaque patches on lungs that look like ground-up glass.”

CNET: Hospital uses VR to show how the coronavirus impacts the lungs

CNET: Hospital uses VR to show how the coronavirus impacts the lungs. “Earlier this month, doctors at George Washington University Hospital encountered their first patient with COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the coronavirus. Now they’re using VR technology to see into the patient’s lungs, the hospital demonstrated in a video posted to YouTube last week.”

Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute: New online tool helps transplant candidates find center that best matches individual patient’s criteria

Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute: New online tool helps transplant candidates find center that best matches individual patient’s criteria. “The website, transplantcentersearch.org, was developed for candidates seeking kidney, liver, heart and lung transplants. Data for liver centers is currently live. Data for other organs will soon be available.”

NIH: NIH Clinical Center provides one of the largest publicly available chest x-ray datasets to scientific community

NIH: NIH Clinical Center provides one of the largest publicly available chest x-ray datasets to scientific community . “The NIH Clinical Center recently released over 100,000 anonymized chest x-ray images and their corresponding data to the scientific community. The release will allow researchers across the country and around the world to freely access the datasets and increase their ability to teach computers how to detect and diagnose disease. Ultimately, this artificial intelligence mechanism can lead to clinicians making better diagnostic decisions for patients.”