The Conversation: Are people lying more since the rise of social media and smartphones?

The Conversation: Are people lying more since the rise of social media and smartphones?. “Social psychologists and communication scholars have long wondered not just who lies the most, but where people tend to lie the most – that is, in person or through some other communication medium. A seminal 2004 study was among the first to investigate the connection between deception rates and technology. Since then, the ways we communicate have shifted – fewer phone calls and more social media messaging, for example – and I wanted to see how well earlier results held up.”

Washington Post: National Archives exhibit blurs images critical of President Trump

Washington Post: National Archives exhibit blurs images critical of President Trump. “The Archives acknowledged in a statement this week that it made multiple alterations to the photo of the 2017 Women’s March showcased at the museum, blurring signs held by marchers that were critical of Trump. Words on signs that referenced women’s anatomy were also blurred. In the original version of the 2017 photograph, taken by Getty Images photographer Mario Tama, the street is packed with marchers carrying a variety of signs, with the Capitol in the background. In the Archives version, at least four of those signs are altered.” The National Archives has apologized for what it characterized as a “mistake.”

CNN: Facebook says it’s ‘not deaf’ to criticism. But it will still let politicians lie in ads

CNN: Facebook says it’s ‘not deaf’ to criticism. But it will still let politicians lie in ads. “In a blog post, Rob Leathern, who oversees Facebook’s political ad library, said the company was not making any major revisions to its policies on political ads. Leathern did however ask political leaders to establish new rules that would govern digital political advertising.” Taking responsibility for your company’s actions is soooo… hang on, need to go find an era where giant corporations took responsibility for their actions…

Engadget: FBI admits to ‘over-counting’ inaccessible mobile devices

Engadget: FBI admits to ‘over-counting’ inaccessible mobile devices. “For the last two years, the FBI has repeatedly claimed that thousands of phones linked to criminal investigations were inaccessible due to locks and encryption. Last year FBI Director Christopher Wray said it had failed to access 7,800 mobile devices, but tonight a Washington Post report reveals that number is incorrect. According to the Post, the accurate number is between 1,000 and 2,000, with a recent internal estimate putting at about 1,200 devices, and in a statement, the FBI responded: ‘The FBI’s initial assessment is that programming errors resulted in significant over-counting of mobile devices reported.’”

Wired: Facebook teaches bots how to negotiate. They learn to lie instead

Wired: Facebook teaches bots how to negotiate. They learn to lie instead. “The Facebook Artificial Intelligence Research (FAIR) group, in collaboration with Georgia Institute of Technology, has released code that it says will allow bots to negotiate. The problem? A paper published this week on the R&D reveals that the negotiating bots learned to lie. Facebook’s chatbots are in danger of becoming a little too much like real-world sales agents.”