Mashable: Otter app transcribes conversations like it’s no big deal

Mashable: Otter app transcribes conversations like it’s no big deal. “Anyone who’s ever transcribed an audio interview into text knows what a painfully slow process that is. But with the new Otter app, created by a company called AI Sense, this could become a thing of the past, even when transcribing a complex conversation with several people speaking. The app, which I tried out at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, is simple to use: Start it up, and it’ll start turning the conversation around it into text. After a quick setup process, it knows when you are speaking, and it can distinguish between different voices in the conversation.”

Poynter: This tool makes editing podcasts just as easy as editing text

Poynter: This tool makes editing podcasts just as easy as editing text. “It’s an understatement to say that podcasting has exploded over the past few years. Though the format has existed for more than a decade, shows like ‘Serial’ and ‘The Daily’ ushered in a golden age of audio. Podcasts have a low barrier to entry. With a little audio editing knowledge and some free software, almost anyone can make one. But a new tool eliminates that barrier entirely by opening up podcast editing to anyone who knows how to edit text.”

The University of Texas at Dallas: Researchers Launch Moon Mission Audio Site

The University of Texas at Dallas: Researchers Launch Moon Mission Audio Site. “NASA recorded thousands of hours of audio from the Apollo lunar missions, yet most of us have only been able to hear the highlights. The agency recorded all communications between the astronauts, mission control specialists and back-room support staff during the historic moon missions in addition to Neil Armstrong’s famous quotes from Apollo 11 in July 1969. Most of the audio remained in storage on outdated analog tapes for decades until researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas launched a project to analyze the audio and make it accessible to the public.” Visit the site, yes, but also read the article. The team innovated a lot to get this done.

Engadget: Google voice recognition could transcribe doctor visits

Engadget: Google voice recognition could transcribe doctor visits. “Doctors work long hours, and a disturbingly large part of that is documenting patient visits — one study indicates that they spend 6 hours of an 11-hour day making sure their records are up to snuff. But how do you streamline that work without hiring an army of note takers? Google Brain and Stanford think voice recognition is the answer. They recently partnered on a study that used automatic speech recognition (similar to what you’d find in Google Assistant or Google Translate) to transcribe both doctors and patients during a session.”

The Distant Librarian: A quick showdown of three automatic transcription tools

The Distant Librarian (and thanks for the mention, Paul!): A quick showdown of three automatic transcription tools. “I didn’t realize it was that long ago, but last December I started playing with an automatic transcription tool called AutoEdit2, and found it pretty decent. Yesterday and today, ResearchBuzz led me to two new options, so I thought I’d do a quick comparison.”

Hongkiat: How to Transcribe YouTube Videos Automatically

Hongkiat: How to Transcribe YouTube Videos Automatically . “It’s quite easy to transcribe YouTube videos as YouTube automatically transcribes most of the videos as soon as they are uploaded. In this post, I’ll show you 3 ways to get YouTube video transcriptions for free.” The first one was YouTube, of course, but I was not familiar with the 3rd party options and didn’t know too much about the Google Docs method.