Engadget: Google’s AI photo app uses crowdsourcing to preserve endangered languages

Engadget: Google’s AI photo app uses crowdsourcing to preserve endangered languages. “Google has a new way to preserve endangered languages: give cultures the AI tools they need to protect the languages themselves. The company has launched Woolaroo, an open source photo translation web app (also available through Google Arts & Culture for Android and iOS) that uses machine learning and image recognition to help preserve languages on the brink. As a user, you just have to point your phone’s camera at an object to have the AI recognize and describe it in a given language, complete with pronunciation.”

PC Gamer: No, Tabletop Simulator, you can’t outsource localisation to Google Translate

PC Gamer: No, Tabletop Simulator, you can’t outsource localisation to Google Translate. “Listen, Google Translate isn’t terrible in a pinch. If you need to quickly work out how to say ‘sandwich’ in German, it’ll do. Unfortunately, Tabletop Simulator developer Berserk discovered the hard way that you can’t replace a full localisation team with Google’s web tool. Last week’s update claimed to bump the number of supported languages in the table-flipper up to 29. But non-anglophone players quickly discovered this claim came with a massive caveat—namely, that the new translations seemed to have been hastily thrown together using Google Translate, with disastrous results.”

The News Minute: Mia Khalifa responds to ‘regains consciousness’ Google Translate gaffe

The News Minute: Mia Khalifa responds to ‘regains consciousness’ Google Translate gaffe. “Two days after former adult actor Mia Khalifa expressed her solidarity with the farmers protesting in India against the contentious farm laws, a pro-Hindu group staged protests against her, burning her photographs and holding up a rather puzzling placard that read, ‘Mia Khalifa regains consciousness.’ It was later revealed that it was an instance of Google translate going wrong, as the protesters were reportedly asking Mia to ‘hosh mein aao,’ which ideally translates to ‘come to your senses.’”

Lost in translation: Google Translate says Siya Kolisi was “cheating” (East Coast Radio South Africa)

East Coast Radio (South Africa): Lost in translation: Google Translate says Siya Kolisi was “cheating”. “Springbok captain Siya Kolisi’s tweet may have gotten him into trouble after Google Translate made a mess of things. Kolisi is known to have quite the sense of humour, and when he posted a picture of himself and his wife Rachel with a funny caption in his home language, isiXhosa, nobody was ready for how Google would translate the caption into English.”

Slator: Thai Mistranslation Shows Risk of Auto-Translating Social Media Content

Slator: Thai Mistranslation Shows Risk of Auto-Translating Social Media Content. “After a machine translation of a post from English into Thai about the King’s birthday proved offensive to the Thai monarchy, Facebook Thailand said it was deactivating auto-translate on Facebook and Instagram, revamping machine translation (MT) quality, and offering the Thai people its ‘profound apology.’”

Search Engine Journal: Google Translate Widget is Free Again for Some Websites to Use

Search Engine Journal: Google Translate Widget is Free Again for Some Websites to Use. “Google is again supporting the Google Translate website translator tool in an effort help people get the information they need amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Google had previously withdrawn support for this plugin, which gave site visitors a way to translate pages into 100+ languages for free.”

Times of India: Google Translate gets support for five new languages

Times of India: Google Translate gets support for five new languages. “Google translate help users by giving them perfect translations in different languages. The company has rolled out the latest update for the app which will make it useful for more people. Google has announced that it is adding five new languages to the Google translate app. This is the first expansion made by the company in the past few years.”

BBC: Can computer translators ever beat speaking a foreign tongue?

BBC: Can computer translators ever beat speaking a foreign tongue?. “Put crottin de chèvre into Google Translate, and you’ll be told it means goat dung. So if it appeared on a menu, you might pass. Alas, you would be ruling out a delicious cheese made of goat’s milk that is often served as a starter in France. Such misunderstandings are why Google admits that its free tool, used by about 500 million people, is not intended to replace human translators.”

Machine Non-Learning: The Chinese Words That Trip Up Google Translate (The Bejinger)

The Bejinger: Machine Non-Learning: The Chinese Words That Trip Up Google Translate. “Humankind now speaks more than 5,000 languages, which as anyone who has traveled or lived in a foreign country can attest to, makes life more interesting, if not at times several times more complicated. It is fairly common then for us to turn to translation tools for help, and Google Translate is probably one of the most trusted popular among them (despite the hurdles of the GFW). Yet when translating a language like Chinese – one that is radically different from the Latin language family – digital translators may not be savvy enough to provide a nuanced, reliable definition after all.”

The Verge: Google Translate will transcribe translations in real time on Android

The Verge: Google Translate will transcribe translations in real time on Android. “Google plans to add a live transcription feature to its Google Translate app for Android at some point in the future. The feature will allow users to record audio in one language and have it rendered in another in real time. It’s still in the prototype stage, but Google gave a demonstration of the technology during a series of artificial intelligence demos at its San Francisco office on Tuesday.”

Microsoft Translator Blog: Dia daoibh! Tá Gaeilge againn!

Microsoft Translator Blog: Dia daoibh! Tá Gaeilge againn!. “Our ongoing mission to break down language barriers continues with Irish: Today, we have added Irish Gaelic to Microsoft Translator. Irish Gaelic, usually referred to as the Irish Language or just Irish, and commonly known in Irish itself as Gaeilge (pronounced “gwael-guh”), is the latest addition to the Microsoft Translator family of languages. This brings Irish to all scenarios powered by Microsoft Translator, including Custom Translator, which helps customers to build translation systems for domain-specific terminology and style.”