Exact Editions: Subscriptions to The Jewish Quarterly now available on the Exact Editions platform

Exact Editions: Subscriptions to The Jewish Quarterly now available on the Exact Editions platform. “Exact Editions is pleased to announce that individuals and institutions can once again purchase a subscription to The Jewish Quarterly. Subscribers will gain access to the full digital archive going back to its very first issue published in 1953 with over 200 back issues included.”

Brickset: Digital archive of Blocks magazine now online

Brickset: Digital archive of Blocks magazine now online. “Blocks is delighted to announce that we’re opening up the back catalogue, providing access to more than 80 digital back issues of the LEGO magazine for fans, including the rare pilot issue. Print subscribers will get this new perk completely free for the duration of their subscription!”

University of New Mexico: New online home for the New Mexico Historical Review

University of New Mexico: New online home for the New Mexico Historical Review. “The University Libraries Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Communications (DISC) has created a new online home for the New Mexico Historical Review. The journal is now open access for viewing previous issues from 1926 to 2013 in the UNM Digital Repository. The most recent six years will remain behind a moving paywall.”

The Herald (Scotland): The end for the greatest source of 70 years of bagpiping history in the world?

The Herald (Scotland): The end for the greatest source of 70 years of bagpiping history in the world?. “….the monthly Piping Times and its sister magazine, the bi-monthly Piping Today ceased publication last year through the Covid crisis…. In their place there are plans to at least get the Piping Times produced as an annual publication. And the proposal also involves a move to digitise the magazines archive so it can be a free-to-access resource online. To make it happen the National Piping Centre, which serves as a national and international centre of excellence for the instrument and its music, has launched a crowdfunding campaign to protect the magazines’ legacy.” The crowdfunding effort is available at https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/pipingtimes .

Exact Editions Blog: The complete digital archive of The British Museum Magazine is now available

Exact Editions Blog: The complete digital archive of The British Museum Magazine is now available. “Exact Editions is delighted to announce that institutional subscribers to The British Museum Magazine can now access the full archive of back issues as well as its members. The museum’s membership magazine now goes back to its very first issue published in Spring 1990 and includes 30 years of back issues to explore, with its 100th issue soon to be published.”

Autocar: Work begins to digitise 126 years of Autocar magazine

Autocar: Work begins to digitise 126 years of Autocar magazine. “It’s believed that the only interruptions were during the General Strike in 1926, the Fuel Crisis in 1973 and print-related issues in 1975. That means around 6500 issues and 700,000 pages will be digitised as part of the project – enough paper to cover the 130 miles from Autocar’s London offices to Archive Digital’s Coventry facility.”

Click on Detroit: Epicurious is righting cultural wrongs one recipe at a time

Click on Detroit: Epicurious is righting cultural wrongs one recipe at a time. “With a new Black editor in chief and ambitious promises to do better, a little corner of the Conde Nast universe is taking on racial and cultural injustice one recipe at a time. Since July, the small staff at Epicurious, a resource site for home cooks, has been scouring 55 years’ worth of recipes from a variety of Conde Nast magazines in search of objectionable titles, ingredient lists and stories told through a white American lens.”

Wired: I Love Reading 1980s Computer Magazines, and So Should You

Wired: I Love Reading 1980s Computer Magazines, and So Should You. “Some species of technology go extinct for good reason. The penny-farthing, with its huge front wheel, seems vaguely ridiculous in retrospect—and also pretty dangerous. In a Darwinian struggle, it should die. But sometimes an innovation dies out for some other, lesser reason—one that’s more a function of the market at the time, or other considerations, than any overarching principle of quality…. Many other good ideas have gotten buried in the past and are waiting to be rediscovered.”

PetaPixel: You Can Read 165 Years of the Royal Photographic Society’s Journal for Free

Not sure how new, but new-to-me, from PetaPixel: You Can Read 165 Years of the Royal Photographic Society’s Journal for Free. “The Royal Photographic Society Journal is the oldest continually published photographic periodical in the world, and its entire archive of issues from 1853 to 2018 is available to read online… for free. As described by the organization, the Royal Photographic Society Journal has covered artistic and technical developments within photography over the last century and a half.”

Garage: How ’70s Magazine “Radical Software” Predicted the Future

New-to-me, from Garage: How ’70s Magazine “Radical Software” Predicted the Future. “In the spring of 1970, a group of self-proclaimed “hardware freaks” published the first issue of Radical Software, a print magazine that detailed emerging trends in video, television, and early computing. Its pages burst with enthusiasm—there are guides for creating neighborhood documentaries, comedic recipes for ‘video rabbit,’ and calls for new ‘information economies’ meant to liberate data from private ownership. In an article for Rhizome, artist Phyllis Segura (then Gershuny, co-founder with Beryl Korot) writes, ‘the underlying circumstances that led to Radical Software… [were] curiosity and confinement.’ Sound familiar?”

Pitchfork: Every Issue of Punk Planet Is Available on the Internet Archive

Pitchfork: Every Issue of Punk Planet Is Available on the Internet Archive. “You can now read all 80 issues of Punk Planet for free on the Internet Archive. Founded by writer and editor Dan Sinker, the Chicago music and politics zine ran as a print publication from 1994 until 2007. In addition to music features and reviews, Punk Planet covered topics like feminism, politics, human rights, and labor. Issues included interviews with Sleater-Kinney, Nick Cave, Ralph Nader, and countless other cultural icons.”