Publishers Weekly: PW Inks Distribution Deal for Digital Archive

Publishers Weekly: PW Inks Distribution Deal for Digital Archive. “Publishers Weekly has reached an agreement with East View Information Services for East View to distribute the Publishers Weekly Digital Archive. The archive is composed of 7,500 past issues of Publishers Weekly, with more than 650,000 fully searchable pages. In addition to the news articles and features, the archive hosts 5,000 author interviews, bestseller lists beginning in 1895, and 435,000 book reviews beginning in the 1940s.”

Linux Journal: Linux Journal is Back

Linux Journal: Linux Journal is Back. “As of today, Linux Journal is back, and operating under the ownership of Slashdot Media. As Linux enthusiasts and long-time fans of Linux Journal, we were disappointed to hear about Linux Journal closing its doors last year. It took some time, but fortunately we were able to get a deal done that allows us to keep Linux Journal alive now and indefinitely. It’s important that amazing resources like Linux Journal never disappear.”

Wired: America’s Top Science Journal Has Had It With Trump

I apologize for the politics. Wired: America’s Top Science Journal Has Had It With Trump. “WITH AN ARCHIVE that goes back to 1880 and a reputation for publishing world-changing research, the journal Science is the apex predator of academic publishing. Getting an article past its gatekeepers and peer reviewers can make a researcher’s career; the journal’s news section is a model for high-level reporting on everything from quarks to viruses to blue whales to galactic clusters. Along with its competitors Cell and Nature, the journal represents not just new knowledge but also the cultural mores of the world it covers—innovation, integrity, accuracy, rectitude, fealty to data. So it’s surprising (but maybe not as much as you think) that Science’s newish editor-in-chief has focused a laser-like stream of neural energy at calling out the crummy pandemic policies of the Trump administration.”

InPublishing: Poetry London Launches Complete 24-Year Digital Archive For Institutions

InPublishing: Poetry London Launches Complete 24-Year Digital Archive For Institutions. “Available for institutional subscriptions, the fully-searchable resource will grow with each new issue published and allows for seamless access to a treasure trove of work from emerging and acclaimed poets, says Exact Editions. Poetry London has risen from modest beginnings as a listings newsletter into one of the UK’s leading poetry magazines. Published three times a year, each issue features poems and reviews from London and far beyond, including work in translation.”

Poynter: Scientific American, the oldest U.S. magazine, hits another milestone as the appetite for science news heats up

Poynter: Scientific American, the oldest U.S. magazine, hits another milestone as the appetite for science news heats up. “While the nation’s news cycle was focused last week on Hurricane Laura, the Republican National Convention and protests over another painful police shooting, the country’s oldest continuously published magazine celebrated its 175th birthday. Not all that quietly, either. Scientific American’s special anniversary issue dropped Friday. It has two themes — articles of note from that very long lifespan woven into features on the biggest things we have learned about science and how we learned them over the last 175 years.”

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American

Scientific American: Explore 175 Years of Words in Scientific American. “We invite you to dive in and explore a database of words that appeared prominently in the print history of Scientific American. Below, each year of that history is represented by a single word, which was selected through a text-analysis project that started with all 5,107 issues of the magazine. Words whose relative frequency peaked in each individual year were identified.”

Just Launched: U.S. Women’s and Girls’ Magazines Web Archive (Columbia University)

Columbia University: Just Launched: U.S. Women’s and Girls’ Magazines Web Archive. “Developed by librarians within the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, the archive consists of websites of women’s media that previously existed as print magazines and have long documented women’s thoughts, activities, economic power, sexuality, political interests, social, cultural, and domestic life.”

Juxtapoz: Letterform Archive Release Online Archive of Counterculture Newspapers and Magazines from the 1960s and 70s

Juxtapoz: Letterform Archive Release Online Archive of Counterculture Newspapers and Magazines from the 1960s and 70s. “Letterform Archive has been creating some wonderful online collections for readers to browse, and a few days ago released a wonderful historic overview of ‘Counterculture Newspapers and Magazines’ of the 1960s and 70s, what LFA describes as ‘an explosion of independent publishing in the 1960s and ’70s(that) took advantage of new, accessible technology to spread countercultural messages around the world.’”

InPublishing: Miniature Wargames Magazine goes digital with new archive

InPublishing: Miniature Wargames Magazine goes digital with new archive. “Dating back to 2010, the online resource comprises over 130 issues and is available for individual and institutional subscriptions. Published by Warners, Miniature Wargames covers all forms of the hobby; primarily historical, but also including fantasy, sci-fi, pulp, steampunk and roleplaying. The monthly magazine features ‘how-to’ guides for painting and scratch-building both figures and scenery, item reviews, opinion pieces and historical information from leading aficionados.”

ARCHAEOLOGY Magazine offering temporary free access

Archaeology is offering temporary free access to its archive. From the site’s front page: “We are excited to introduce temporary complimentary access to our archive of over 70 years of ARCHAEOLOGY Magazine and to bring a world of discovery to your home. Use the link below to access the archive with an email address or to sign in with your digital subscriber information. Once you have signed up for an account, log in as a digital subscriber.”

i-D: This new digital archive of STREET magazine is a timeless lesson in style

i-D: This new digital archive of STREET magazine is a timeless lesson in style. “Since 1985, Japanese fashion magazine STREET has published the best global street style on its pages and forged links between the different subcultures and style tribes that govern the trendiest corners of London, Paris, Tokyo and beyond. Three decades later, a lot has changed in the way we capture street style (and smartphones have all but replaced cigarettes) but its founder and Chief Editor Shoichi Aoki, the genius mind behind FRUiTS magazine as well, is still just as committed to documenting these trends. ‘I had noticed that there weren’t enough photographers documenting street style in the world back then,’ Shoichi says of the magazine’s origins. ‘I did not know about Mr. Bill Cunningham at the time, but I knew that there was good street fashion in Paris and London.’”

Auburn University: AU Libraries complete digitization of The Auburn Alumnus magazine

Auburn University: AU Libraries complete digitization of The Auburn Alumnus magazine. “‘The Auburn Alumnus magazine ran from 1913 to 1939,’ said Greg Schmidt, Acting head of Special Collections & Archives and lead on the digitization project. ‘For those years, it was the go-to source for news of our university’s alumni. These magazines are a view into a different time at Auburn. They’re really fun to take a deep dive into. We are looking forward to making other Auburn-related collections, including historic video and sound recordings accessible to everyone.’”

High Times: High Times Opens Its Digital Archive To All

High Times: High Times Opens Its Digital Archive To All. “Just as industry webinars and sesh hangouts on Zoom are starting to lose their appeal as sources of quarantine cannabis content, High Times has come to the rescue by opening the magazine’s archives online for all the world to view for free. From interviews with cultural icons such as Andy Warhol and Hunter S. Thompson to work contributed by the likes of Charles Bukowski and William S. Burroughs, High Times has featured stories that are nearly nonexistent in today’s fast cut, clickbait society. By simply registering online with an email address, every issue of High Times ever published can be viewed online through May 20, with no credit card required.”