Game Over for GandCrab: New free decryption tool allows victims to unlock all versions of this ransomware

ZDNet: Game Over for GandCrab: New free decryption tool allows victims to unlock all versions of this ransomware. “A new decryption tool that counters one of the most prolific families of ransomware by allowing victims to retrieve their files for free has been released in a collaborative effort by Europol, the FBI, cybersecurity company Bitdefender, and others.”

Engadget: Samsung tweet suggests scanning your smart TV for malware every few weeks

Engadget: Samsung tweet suggests scanning your smart TV for malware every few weeks. “This morning a Samsung customer support account tweeted an odd warning that, to prevent malicious software attacks on your smart TV, you should scan it for viruses every few weeks. It even included an instructional video to help you do so. The tweet, first spotted by The Verge, was short lived. Samsung has since removed it, but it existed long enough to raise a few red flags.”

Baltimore’s bill for ransomware: Over $18 million, so far (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Baltimore’s bill for ransomware: Over $18 million, so far. “It has been a month since the City of Baltimore’s networks were brought to a standstill by ransomware. On Tuesday, Mayor Bernard ‘Jack’ Young and his cabinet briefed press on the status of the cleanup, which the city’s director of finance has estimated will cost Baltimore $10 million—not including $8 million lost because of deferred or lost revenue while the city was unable to process payments. The recovery remains in its early stages, with less than a third of city employees issued new log-in credentials thus far and many city business functions restricted to paper-based workarounds.”

EurekAlert: Illinois researchers add ‘time-travel’ feature to drives to fight ransomware attacks

EurekAlert: Illinois researchers add ‘time-travel’ feature to drives to fight ransomware attacks. “One of the latest cyber threats involves hackers encrypting user files and then charging ‘ransom'” to get them back. In the paper, ‘Project Almanac: A Time-Traveling Solid State Drive,’ University of Illinois students Chance Coats and Xiaohao Wang and Assistant Professor Jian Huang from the Coordinated Science Laboratory look at how they can use the commodity storage devices already in a computer, to save the files without having to pay the ransom.”