Oregon State University: Meet some of Oregon’s most recognizable gray whales via new OSU website

Oregon State University: Meet some of Oregon’s most recognizable gray whales via new OSU website. ” Scarlett is known for the large scar on her back. Equal bears the mark of a boat propeller injury. Roller Skate’s fluke was damaged due to entanglement with fishing gear. Solé has a favorite foraging ground she returns to each year. Each of these gray whales was nicknamed by researchers in the Geospatial Ecology of Marine Megafauna Laboratory at Oregon State University’s Marine Mammal Institute…. Now they want the public to get to know some of these whales, too.”

Joplin Globe: Area students partner with Smithsonian for nationwide research project

Joplin Globe: Area students partner with Smithsonian for nationwide research project. “The project, called Snapshot USA, is a partnership between the museum and one university from each of the 50 states with students capturing photographs and collecting research for a national wildlife database. The goal is to analyze nationwide trends in mammal communities, as well as the influence of human beings on nature.”

International Business Times: Mammal Biodiversity 20% Larger Than Previously Thought, New Database Find

New-to-me, from International Business Times: Mammal Biodiversity 20% Larger Than Previously Thought, New Database Find. “Earth has 6,399 distinct mammal species living today, while 96 others have gone extinct in the last 500 years, according to a new database on mammalian diversity. This number is almost 20 percent higher than the previous known figure of 5,416 mammal species that were known in 2005, and a much larger jump from the 4,631 species known in 1993. The Mammal Diversity Database, which lists the new taxonomy for mammals, is publicly accessible and was founded in 2017 by the American Society of Mammalogists, which funds it along with the National Science Foundation.”

U of Wyoming: UW Geological Museum Receives Grant to Digitize Wyoming’s Rare Fossil Mammal Collection

University of Wyoming: UW Geological Museum Receives Grant to Digitize Wyoming’s Rare Fossil Mammal Collection. “The University of Wyoming Geological Museum has only one-half of 1 percent of its fossils on display to the public. The other 99.5 percent are stored away, and very few, save some visiting researchers, rarely see these hidden treasures in any form. Thanks to a $100,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the museum will be able to make more of its rare fossil mammal collection available to researchers, schools and the public through digitization of roughly 5,000 items.”

Database of Whale Tails

New-to-Me: Did you know there was a database of whale tails? And it’s getting an upgrade “[Davis] Yeo has focused primarily on marine biology and oceanography while at COA. On top of taking classes in the area, he also works at Allied Whale, the college’s marine mammal laboratory. Last winter, Yeo completed an internship at the Virginia Aquarium where he helped identify and catalog humpback whales wintering off the coast of Virginia Beach. It was here that Davis gained the knowledge and experience needed to continue with field research and analysis. For his senior project, Yeo is combining his passion for science and marine life with his experiences in the field for an extensive endeavor that he hopes will yield positive benefits for Allied Whale.”