Global Times: Digital archiving used to preserve Tibetan manuscripts

Global Times: Digital archiving used to preserve Tibetan manuscripts . “Preservation of ancient palm-leaf manuscripts collected in Lhasa’s Potala Palace in Southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region has entered the digital archiving phase, the cultural relics research office of the Potala Palace announced on Sunday. With a total of 29,380 leaves, the Potala Palace has the largest collection of palm-leaf manuscripts in China. A plan to take inventory of and protect the manuscripts was kicked off in May 2020, China News reported on Sunday.”

Introducing Unfolding History: Manuscripts at the Library of Congress (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Introducing Unfolding History: Manuscripts at the Library of Congress. “They are found in collections that document our political, social, cultural, military, and scientific pasts. And there are a lot of collections: more than 12,000 of them, which together encompass more than 70 million items. Among them are the personal papers of presidents and artists, judges and activists, generals and poets, scientists and nurses, and transformative organizations like the NAACP and the Works Progress Administration. More are added every year. Unfolding History: Manuscripts at the Library of Congress is a new blog that aims to offer a wider window into those collections.

British Library: Antoine de Lonhy and the Saluces Hours

British Library: Antoine de Lonhy and the Saluces Hours . “The Saluces Hours is a manuscript with a complicated genesis. It was produced in Savoy, which in the 15th century was in independent duchy, and today comprises an area of southeast France and northwest Italy. The manuscript was originally begun around the 1440s, several decades before Lonhy’s involvement in the project. In this first stage, the text was probably completed and the process of illuminating the book begun.” Breathtaking! I probably say that half the time for illuminated manuscripts, but it’s always true.

Hill Museum and Manuscript Library: Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) Creates New Database to Assist Scholars of Understudied Manuscript Traditions

Hill Museum and Manuscript Library: Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) Creates New Database to Assist Scholars of Understudied Manuscript Traditions. “The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) at Saint John’s University has developed a new database to support and enhance the study of understudied manuscript traditions. Created as part a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), HMML Authority File is an open-access database which establishes accurate and consistent data (‘authorities’) for the names of persons, places, works, organizations, and families related to the manuscripts and artwork in HMML Reading Room and HMML Museum, which provide free access to the collections of more than 800 libraries worldwide.”

Fragmentology: bits of books and the medieval manuscript (Oxford University Press Blog)

Oxford University Press Blog: Fragmentology: bits of books and the medieval manuscript. “So many fragments of manuscripts exist that a new term—Fragmentology—has recently been applied to the study of these parts and parcels. Librarians, archivists, and academics are paying more attention to what can be learned about textual culture from a folio cut, say, from a twelfth-century manuscript and later used by a binder to line the oak boards of a fifteenth-century book. Scholars are thinking through ways that single leaves preserved in libraries across the world can be digitally reconstructed into a virtual representation of the (or part of the) original book as it might have been first produced.”

Reuters: Mexico recovers missing manuscripts from 16th century sold at auction

Reuters: Mexico recovers missing manuscripts from 16th century sold at auction. “Mexico’s foreign ministry said on Thursday it had recovered valuable manuscripts from the 16th century, including some relating to conquistador Hernan Cortes, months after a group of academics reported them missing from Mexico’s national archives. In apparently systematic fashion, 10 documents were stolen over several years from a collection dedicated to Cortes and later put up for sale in international auction houses including Swann, Bonhams and Christie’s, the academic investigators said.”

Treasure quest: Researchers embark on a pre-modern manuscript mission (Monash University Lens)

Monash University Lens: Treasure quest: Researchers embark on a pre-modern manuscript mission. “Thousands of stories have been written about the impact of COVID-19. One overlooked group is historians in Australia whose research efforts have been stymied by travel restrictions. Medieval scholar Guy Geltner’s solution is to search for any ‘pre-modern’ manuscripts that may be lurking in private collections in Victoria.”

Antara News: Gaining insights into Lampung’s culture through ancient manuscripts

Antara News: Gaining insights into Lampung’s culture through ancient manuscripts. Lampung is a province of Indonesia. “Lampung Province, also known as ‘Sai Bumi Ruwa Jurai,’ not only has abundant agricultural products, such as pepper, coffee, and cloves, but is also rich in customs and culture that can captivate all those who study it. Through various types of ancient manuscripts, Lampung philologists began to explore several puzzles about the culture that developed in Lampung over the past centuries.”

British Library: Qur’an manuscripts from Southeast Asia digitised by the Endangered Archives Programme

British Library: Qur’an manuscripts from Southeast Asia digitised by the Endangered Archives Programme. “I have recently been writing on the British Library’s collection of eight Qur’an manuscripts from Southeast Asia, which have all been digitised. These eight manuscripts represent three regional traditions in the Malay world, with one fine Qu r’an from Patani on the East Coast of the Malay peninsula, three from Aceh and four from Java. However, many more Qur’an manuscripts, mostly still held in private collections in Southeast Asia, are available digitally on the British Library website through the Endangered Archives Programme (EAP).”

Digitisation in Asian and African Collections 2019 to 2021: what’s new online and where to find it (British Library)

British Library: Digitisation in Asian and African Collections 2019 to 2021: what’s new online and where to find it. “In the past year and a half we’ve made over 650 items from the Library’s Asian and African collections newly available online. To make it easier for you to find and explore our wonderful collections, we’ve put together a list of recently digitised items with links to their online versions for you to download here… They are arranged by collection area/project, so you can easily search and filter to your heart’s content!”

British Library: Over 4,500 manuscripts now online

British Library: Over 4,500 manuscripts now online. “Long-term readers of our blog may know that we periodically publish lists of our digitised manuscripts, the last of which was published in July 2020. With the arrival of the New Year and the beginning of a new lockdown in the UK, we are releasing an update to our lists of manuscript hyperlinks. We hope this makes it easier for readers and researchers to explore our amazing digitised treasures online.”