National University of Singapore: Darwin’s handwritten pages from On the Origin of Species go online

National University of Singapore: Darwin’s handwritten pages from On the Origin of Species go online. “An extraordinary collection of priceless manuscripts of naturalist Charles Darwin goes online today, including two rare pages from the original draft of On the Origin of Species. These documents will be added to Darwin Online, a website which contains not only the complete works of Darwin, but is possibly the most comprehensive scholarly portal on any historical individual in the world. The website is helmed by Dr John van Wyhe, an eminent historian of science. He is a Senior Lecturer at NUS Biological Sciences and Tembusu College.”

To Hold Nature in the Hand: Revealing the Wonders of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta (Getty)

Getty: To Hold Nature in the Hand: Revealing the Wonders of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta. “Small enough to hold in the hand, the allure of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta (Wondrous Monuments of Calligraphy) in the Getty Museum’s collection of manuscripts is undeniable. Hold the book close enough, and the butterflies seem to quiver before your eyes and the fruit looks good enough to eat….Viewable in a newly published facsimile and online, readers can now appreciate the impossibly tiny spiraling micro-writing; observe the subtle differences between the green leaves of the crossed tulips; almost feel the rusting surface of the apple; and be delighted by the hair-fine web spun by the spider.”

The Indian Express: Assam’s century-old literary body turns a new page, will digitise its rich archive

The Indian Express: Assam’s century-old literary body turns a new page, will digitise its rich archive. “From the first Assamese language magazine to an ancient treatise on elephantology — publications of yore, some handwritten, some tattered and torn, some considered lost, will soon find a home online, courtesy a mammoth digitising project undertaken by Assam’s oldest literary and cultural body, the Asam Sahitya Sabha.”

Heritage Made Digital: Tudor and Stuart manuscripts go online (British Library)

From last month and I missed it. Apologies to the British Library: Heritage Made Digital: Tudor and Stuart manuscripts go online. “The British Library is home to a world-class collection of manuscripts dating from the time of the Tudors and Stuarts. Over the past few years, we have been undertaking a major programme, known as Heritage Made Digital, with the intention of publishing online more treasures from the Library’s collections. This includes approximately 600 of these Tudor and Stuart manuscripts. Today, we’re very pleased to let you know that the first batch are available to view on our Digitised Manuscripts site — a list is published below.”

BW Education: Digital Library To Be Constructed In Uttarakhand For Preservation Of Sanskrit Manuscripts

BW Education: Digital Library To Be Constructed In Uttarakhand For Preservation Of Sanskrit Manuscripts. “Uttarakhand Chief Minister’s Office (CMO) announced on Tuesday that a digital library will be constructed in the state for the preservation of Sanskrit manuscripts.”

CBC: L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables manuscript going online

CBC: L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables manuscript going online. “Starting in 2022, people will be able to read Anne of Green Gables online thanks to a new digital version of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s original manuscript. The hand-written manuscript will be the centrepiece of a digital exhibition involving the Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CCAG) and the University of Prince Edward Island’s L.M. Montgomery Institute and the Robertson Library.”

British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online

British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online. “One of the most iconic literary manuscripts by one of the world’s most famous playwrights, William Shakespeare (1564–1616), can now be viewed in full online on the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts site. The Booke of Sir Thomas Moore does not immediately spring to mind as among Shakespeare’s masterpieces. This late 16th or early 17th-century play is not always included among the Shakespearean canon, and it was not until the 1800s that it was even associated with the Bard of Avon. So what is the connection with William Shakespeare, the author of the more distinguished Hamlet, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet?”

University of Toronto: U of T’s Myanmar digital library shares rare manuscripts with scholars around the world

University of Toronto: U of T’s Myanmar digital library shares rare manuscripts with scholars around the world . “The open-access digital archive features manuscripts and rare print editions of texts from libraries across Myanmar. It is the result of an ongoing digitizing project led by an international team of scholars and volunteers who have spent more than five years cleaning, cataloguing and curating texts that cover a range of topics connected to the Southeast Asian country, from Buddhist literature and doctrine to medicine and astrology.”

Jerusalem Post: National Library of Israel to open access to 2,500 rare Islamic books

Jerusalem Post: National Library of Israel to open access to 2,500 rare Islamic books. “The National Library of Israel, in coordination with the Arcadia Fund, has announced a major initiative to open digital access to over 2,500 rare Islamic manuscripts and books, according to a press release from library on Monday.”

Cambridge Independent: St John’s College digitises 13th-century Robert de Lindsay manuscript

Cambridge Independent: St John’s College digitises 13th-century Robert de Lindsay manuscript. “A 13th-century illuminated manuscript that has been in St John’s College for nearly 400 years has been digitised to reach a new audience. The 377-page manuscript is a psalter – the most common medieval religious text known as devotionals – that belonged to Robert de Lindsay, the Abbot of Peterborough from 1214 to 1222.”

Hyperallergic: Access Rare and Beautiful “Manuscripts of the Muslim World” via UPenn’s Digital Library

Hyperallergic: Access Rare and Beautiful “Manuscripts of the Muslim World” via UPenn’s Digital Library. “All materials on OPenn are in the public domain or released under Creative Commons licenses as Free Cultural Works. The MMW Project characterizes these materials as ‘mostly unresearched,’ perhaps encouraging a curious army of sequestered armchair historians to dig into this wealth more than 500 manuscripts and 827 paintings from the Islamicate world broadly construed.”

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog. “This month is an exciting anniversary for us: it has been ten years since the British Library’s award-winning Medieval Manuscripts Blog began back in February 2010. It’s a decade that has seen large-scale digitisation, blockbuster exhibitions, exciting acquisitions and fascinating discoveries, and the Blog has been our main way of letting you know about them all. We aim to be inspiring, informative and amusing and above all to share with you the manuscripts love. To celebrate our big anniversary, join us in looking back at some of the Blog’s highlights over the years.”

The Takeout: Largest archive of Mexican cookbook manuscripts available for consumption online

The Takeout: Largest archive of Mexican cookbook manuscripts available for consumption online. “If you love Mexican food and are curious about how it came to be, click right on over to the University of Texas-San Antonio library, which has digitized much of its extensive Mexican cookbook collection, including 48 handwritten manuscripts.”

Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library): Zoroastrian collections in the British Library

Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library): Zoroastrian collections in the British Library. “In the past few years several of our manuscripts have become familiar through exhibitions such as Everlasting Flame: Zoroastrianism in History and Imagination held at SOAS (2013) and New Delhi (2016) and also through the Zoroastrian articles and collection items included in our recent website Discovering Sacred Texts. Building on this and thanks to the philanthropic support of Mrs Purviz Rusy Shroff, we have now been able to complete digitisation of the whole collection. This introductory post outlines the history of the collection and is intended as the first in a series highlighting the collection as the manuscripts go live during the next few months.”