British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog. “This month is an exciting anniversary for us: it has been ten years since the British Library’s award-winning Medieval Manuscripts Blog began back in February 2010. It’s a decade that has seen large-scale digitisation, blockbuster exhibitions, exciting acquisitions and fascinating discoveries, and the Blog has been our main way of letting you know about them all. We aim to be inspiring, informative and amusing and above all to share with you the manuscripts love. To celebrate our big anniversary, join us in looking back at some of the Blog’s highlights over the years.”

The Takeout: Largest archive of Mexican cookbook manuscripts available for consumption online

The Takeout: Largest archive of Mexican cookbook manuscripts available for consumption online. “If you love Mexican food and are curious about how it came to be, click right on over to the University of Texas-San Antonio library, which has digitized much of its extensive Mexican cookbook collection, including 48 handwritten manuscripts.”

Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library): Zoroastrian collections in the British Library

Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library): Zoroastrian collections in the British Library. “In the past few years several of our manuscripts have become familiar through exhibitions such as Everlasting Flame: Zoroastrianism in History and Imagination held at SOAS (2013) and New Delhi (2016) and also through the Zoroastrian articles and collection items included in our recent website Discovering Sacred Texts. Building on this and thanks to the philanthropic support of Mrs Purviz Rusy Shroff, we have now been able to complete digitisation of the whole collection. This introductory post outlines the history of the collection and is intended as the first in a series highlighting the collection as the manuscripts go live during the next few months.”

SC Times: St. John’s Hill Museum & Manuscript Library receives $1.4 million grant

SC Times: St. John’s Hill Museum & Manuscript Library receives $1.4 million grant. “The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library at St. John’s University received more than $1.4 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support its mission to preserve and share the world’s handwritten heritage. The grant will fund a three-year project to catalog 53,000 digitized manuscripts and create an online database of authors and titles originating from underrepresented or little-known literary traditions, according to a news release issued by the university Tuesday.”

Devdiscourse: Satyajit Ray’s film manuscripts digitised

Devdiscourse: Satyajit Ray’s film manuscripts digitised. “The National Digital Library of India (NDLI) on Friday launched digitized versions of filmmaker Satyajit Ray’s film manuscripts, IIT-Kharagpur said in a statement. Besides, digitised news reports of Bengali dailies ‘Jugantar’ and ‘Amrita Bazar Patrika’ on freedom struggle and socio-political developments of the pre-Independence era have also been launched, the statement said.”

British Library: Happy anniversary to the Polonsky Project

British Library: Happy anniversary to the Polonsky Project. “Today is the one-year anniversary of the launch of our collaborative interpretative and digitisation project with the Bibliothèque nationale de France, The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200. A year ago we met in Paris as part of a three-day international conference to celebrate two new bilingual websites that provide unprecedented access to some of the riches of our two national collections. Thanks to generous funding from The Polonsky Foundation, each Library digitised 400 manuscripts made in either England or France before the year 1200.”

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts. “Led by Lehigh University, a partnership of 15 Philadelphia-area libraries has scanned and digitized more than 160,000 pages from 475 original manuscripts, the earliest dating to the ninth century. The hand-lettered and illustrated pages range from brightly hued, gold-leafed illuminated works of art to functional texts intended for students of science, philosophy and religion.”