AJC: New website provides street art map to murals all over Atlanta

AJC: New website provides street art map to murals all over Atlanta . “Atlanta wears its street art like a brilliant, colorful badge of honor. In some neighborhoods, one would be hard-pressed to find a wall that hasn’t already been commandeered by one of many notable artists. Atlanta Street Art Map, created by a man aptly-named Art Rudick, is a website that documents as much of the city’s street art as possible. The retired engineer became interested in the medium during a walking tour of Bushwick in New York and now maintains the site as a hobby, the website says.”

Cision: Canada’s Residential School Story Launches on Google Earth Voyager (PRESS RELEASE)

Cision: Canada’s Residential School Story Launches on Google Earth Voyager (PRESS RELEASE). “Residential schools for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children were first established in 1831 and ran for 165 years until 1996. This system had one goal: to forcibly assimilate Canada’s Indigenous Peoples into the non-Indigenous population. Canadian Geographic Education (Can Geo Education), the first Canadian organization to produce Google Earth Voyager content, has worked closely with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) of the University of Manitoba to create an educational tool that will help students learn about this dark chapter in Canadian history.”

CNET: Google capturing spectacular million-crab march for Street View

CNET: Google capturing spectacular million-crab march for Street View. “Christmas Island, an Australian territory tucked just underneath Indonesia, is home to around 2,000 people. And crabs. Tens of millions of crabs. Each year, the females among these land crabs migrate to the sea, where they lay their eggs. It happens only once a year, but thanks to Google, you’ll soon be able to see it whenever you like.”

Essex Live: Essex businessman hits out after Google lists his driveway as a public road

Essex Live: Essex businessman hits out after Google lists his driveway as a public road. “An Essex businessman has hit out at Google after spotting walkers having picnics on his private driveway because the internet search engine wrongly lists it as a public road. Jeremy MacBean, 52, from Bradwell-on-Sea, said the error on Google Maps has been confusing ramblers and lorry drivers who then mistakenly end up on his home’s driveway for years.”

Notre Dame: English professor wins NEH grant to bolster major digital humanities research database

University of Notre Dame: English professor wins NEH grant to bolster major digital humanities research database. “Associate Professor of English Matthew Wilkens is fascinated by the use of geography in literature over time. How, for example, did the Civil War affect the importance of certain places in American literature, and what can literature tells us about Americans’ sense of place? The answer can be found in books written during that period — potentially thousands of them, many more than Wilkens could ever read and analyze himself. To consider the widest possible range of literary production, Wilkens turned to computation. He was recently awarded a $325,000 Digital Humanities Implementation Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to bolster Textual Geographies, a database and suite of tools he is developing that allow users to find, map, and analyze more than 14 billion place name mentions from books and journals in English, Spanish, German, and Chinese.”

The Hindu: Google faces inquiry over location data collection

The Hindu: Google faces inquiry over location data collection. “After Google reportedly confirmed the practice of gathering location data from Android devices even when the service was disabled by users, regulators in South Korea summoned representatives of the tech giant this week for questioning. Data protection officials in Britain are also looking into the matter, CNNMoney reported on Friday.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Acquires Extremely Rare Mesoamerican Codex

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Acquires Extremely Rare Mesoamerican Codex. “The Library of Congress has acquired the Codex Quetzalecatzin, one of the very few Mesoamerican manuscripts to survive from the 16th century. After being in private collections for more than 100 years, the codex has been digitally preserved and made available online for the first time to the general public…”