KSBW: New online interactive tool helps Californians prepare for future drought

KSBW: New online interactive tool helps Californians prepare for future drought. “This rain-year has brought an alarmingly dry winter in California so far, according to climate change experts. Now, there’s a new tool to help Californians navigate your water supply. It’s an online toll that allows a person to see the groundwater levels in their area. The tool then gives a representation of what could be at risk or impacted if a drought hits.” Pretty sure that first “online toll” should be “online tool.”

KNX1070: LA Controller Releases Online Map Identifying Historic African American Sites

KNX1070: LA Controller Releases Online Map Identifying Historic African American Sites. “The map, titled ‘African American Heritage Across Los Angeles,’ showcases 28 places, monuments and institutions that are recognized as culturally or historically significant to the development of the city’s black community, [Ron] Galperin said.”

Public News Service: New Online Map Shows Sexual-Health Resources in Appalachia

Public News Service: New Online Map Shows Sexual-Health Resources in Appalachia. “The traveling sex-education workshop that teaches about consent and anatomy in rural Appalachia has created a unique new online map that shows the locations of reproductive-justice-related organizations and health-care providers in the region.”

Route Fifty: Frustrated by Flawed Broadband Maps, States Are Trying to Create Their Own

Route Fifty: Frustrated by Flawed Broadband Maps, States Are Trying to Create Their Own. “State officials tasked with overseeing expansion of broadband to their residents say it is paramount to have accurate information about where infrastructure and service is lacking. But because connectivity data collected by the Federal Communications Commission often overestimates broadband’s reach, many states are trying to gather their own data, sometimes going door-to-door to query residents, to better understand service gaps.”

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View. “The Street View feature on Google Maps enables users to see landscapes and scenery on the maps. Under the prefecture’s system using special software, residents can experience flooding in a more realistic fashion and become more aware of the need to plan anti-disaster measures, the officials said. Essentially, they will be able to pick evacuation routes in a more simplified way than using the current hazard maps.”

San Diego State University: Climate Data at Your Fingertips

San Diego State University: Climate Data at Your Fingertips . “While Julien Pierret was conducting research for his Ph.D. in climate data, he was playing around with a web graphics library and looking for a reason to learn about it. ‘I’m a child when it comes to exploring different tools and wanted to incorporate this into my Ph.D.,’ he admitted. His exploration eventually evolved into a web-based tool – four-dimensional visual delivery or 4DVD – that offers convenient, open access to climate data for regions across the world. “

Find. Map. Save: join the search to save thousands of miles of lost historic paths (Ramblers)

Ramblers: Find. Map. Save: join the search to save thousands of miles of lost historic paths. “An estimated 10,000 miles of historic paths – the equivalent of the distance from London to Sydney – are thought to be missing from the map in England and Wales. These historic paths are a vital part of our heritage, describing how people have travelled over the centuries, yet if they are not claimed by 2026, we risk losing them forever. We want to build a movement of ‘citizen geographers’ to help find all these missing rights of way before it’s too late.”